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See detailPalaeoichthyological investigation in the Luga area of Leningrad Region: past and present
Ivanov, Alexander; Lebedev, Oleg; Clément, Gaël et al

in Lebedev, Oleg; Ivanov, Alexander (Eds.) Palaeozoic Early Vertebrates II - Obruchev Symposium - Abstracts (2011)

A list of Devonian vertebrates from the Luga District of the Leningrad Region (Russia) was originally mentioned by P. N. Venyukov (1884). However, detailed palaeoichthyological studies in this territory ... [more ▼]

A list of Devonian vertebrates from the Luga District of the Leningrad Region (Russia) was originally mentioned by P. N. Venyukov (1884). However, detailed palaeoichthyological studies in this territory started in only during 1926-1931 in the framework of the geological mapping programme. Two field crews studied the sections of the Middle and Upper Devonian by the Luga, Lemovzha, Oredezh, Tesovaya and Vruda rivers. One of the teams was the Devonian Lithological expedition under guided by R. F. Hecher. D. V. Obruchev was also involved in the works of this expedition. Other team headed by B. P. Asatkin surveyed the western part of the Leningrad Region. Both teams sampled numerous outcrops and boreholes, and collected abundant vertebrate remains. As a result the Devonian deposits were subdivided into the regional beds characterized by diverse vertebrate assemblages. Collectioning and research of Devonian vertebrates in this area continued in the 1950-1960ties by D. V. Obruchev and his students: V. N. Karatajute-Talimaa, E. Mark-Kurik, L. A. Lyarskaya. Their descriptions of Eifelian-Frasnian agnathans and fishes were published in the series of monographs or papers (e.g. Karatajute-Talimaa, 1963, Obruchev & Mark-Kurik, 1965, Lyarskaya, 1981). During the last thirty years J. Valiukevicius and some of the authors of the present report supplemented the vertebrate collections from some sections. The new localities in this area were reported by the 2001 Latvian-Russian Expedition (A. Ivanov, E. Luksevics, I. Zupins and others). The 2009-2010 Russo-Franco-Latvian expedition discovered a new diverse material from the historical and new localities of that area. [less ▲]

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See detailPalaeolithic and Mesolithic Research in Belgium, 1993: le Trou Magrite, Huccorgne & l'Abri du Pape
Straus, Lawrence; Otte, Marcel ULg; Cordy, Jean-Marie ULg et al

in Old World Archaeology Newsletter (1993), XVII(1), 17-24

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See detailA Palaeolithic site at Wadi Bili in the Red Sea Mountains, Egypt
Vermeersch, Pierre M.; Van Peer, Philip; Van Neer, Wim et al

in Bicho, Nuno F. (Ed.) From the Mediterranean Basin to the Portugese Atlantic Shore: Papers in Honor of Anthony Marks (2007)

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See detailPalaeophytogeographical and palaeoecological implications of a miospore assemblage of earliest Devonian (Lochkovian) age from Saudi Arabia
Steemans, Philippe ULg; Wellman, C. H.; Filatoff, J.

in Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology (2007), 250(1-4), 237-254

Palynological samples from two boreholes drilled in the eastern part of Saudi Arabia contain a rich assemblage of cryptospores and trilete spores. They are dated as most probably Lochkovian in age ... [more ▼]

Palynological samples from two boreholes drilled in the eastern part of Saudi Arabia contain a rich assemblage of cryptospores and trilete spores. They are dated as most probably Lochkovian in age. Intriguingly, the cryptospores are very similar to those from a coeval continental palynomorph assemblage from the Old Red Sandstone Continent, whereas the trilete spores show a strong affinity with miospore assemblages from Western Gondwana. It is suggested that cryptospore-producing plants inhabited confined, damp biotopes and had a wide range of climatic tolerance. On the otherhand, trilete spore-producing plants inhabited a wider variety of biotopes but were more sensitive to climatic variations. The high degree of similarity between Old Red Sandstone and Saudi Arabian cryptospore assemblages favours palaeogeographic reconstructions where there is close proximity between Western Gondwana and Euramerica and/or a land connection between these palaeoplates. Climatic differences between the Old Red Sandstone Continent and the northern part of Western Gondwana can be invoked to explain the variations in the trilete spore assemblages. (c) 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailPalaeoproterozoic Microfossils (chap 7.11.2.)
Javaux, Emmanuelle ULg; Lepot, Kevin ULg; van Zuilen, Mark et al

in Melezhik, Viktor; Fallick, A. E.; Kump, L. R. (Eds.) et al Reading the Archive of Earth’s Oxygenation (2012)

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See detailPalaeozoic Innovations in the Micro- and Megafossil Plant Record: from the Earliest Plant spores to the Earliest Seeds
Steemans, Philippe ULg; Petus, Elodie ULg; Breuer, Pierre et al

in Talent, John (Ed.) Global Biodiversity, Extinction Intervals and Biogeographic Perturbations Through Time (2012)

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See detailPalaeozoic Palaeobotany
Gerrienne, Philippe ULg

Book (2006)

Special Issue of the Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology

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See detailPalaeozoic palynology of the Kingdom Saudi-Arabia
Al-Hajri, S.; Al-Ruwaili, M.; Clayton, G. et al

Conference (2000)

GeoArabia Special Publication 1 <br /> <br />Knowledge of the Palaeozoic biostratigraphy of the Arabian Peninsula, situated close to the northern margin of Gondwana, was poorly known until a joint special ... [more ▼]

GeoArabia Special Publication 1 <br /> <br />Knowledge of the Palaeozoic biostratigraphy of the Arabian Peninsula, situated close to the northern margin of Gondwana, was poorly known until a joint special project was held by the Saudi Arabian Oil Company (Saudi Aramco) and the Commission Internationale de Microflore du Paléozoïque (CIMP) in 1990. Prior to that only a small number of investigations had been published. Few efforts had been made to exploit the strati-graphic potentials of the many undescribed indigenous microfossils. The joint Saudi Aramco-CIMP project was designed to reverse that situation. Comprehensive studies were carried out on a range of microfossil groups throughout the Palaeozoic and results were published in 1995. <br /> <br />The 13 papers presented in this GeoArabia Special Publication update those initial findings. They clearly indicate the potential for these palynomorph assemblages to not only to provide a method for well-to-well correlations within Saudi Arabia, but also for establishing the palaeo-biogeographical relationships of the Arabian Plate relative to adjacent landmasses. The conclusions that are proposed here can now be compared with datasets throughout North Africa and with the central and southern parts of South America. <br /> <br />Editors: Sa’id Al-Hajri and Bernard Owens <br />231 pages <br />40 plates/62 illustrations [less ▲]

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See detailPalaeozoic palynology. A special Issue in honour of Dr. Stanisla Loboziak
Steemans, Philippe ULg; Servais, T.; Streel, Maurice ULg

in Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology (2002), 118(Special Issue), 1-421

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See detailPalaeozoic Reefs and Bioaccumulations: Climatic and Evolutionary Controls
Álvaro; Aretz; Boulvain, Frédéric ULg et al

Book published by Geological Society (2007)

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See detailPalatoschisis in the dog: developmental mechanisms and etiology
Van Den Berghe, Femke ULg; Cornillie, Pieter; Stegen, Ludo et al

in Vlaams Diergeneeskunde Tijdschift = Flemish Veterinary Journal (2010)

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See detailPaleo-earthquake timing on the North Anatolian Fault: Where, when, and how sure are we?
Fraser, J; Vanneste, K.; Hubert, Aurelia ULg

in Geophysical Research Abstracts (2009, April), 11

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See detailPaleo-oceanography: Cenozoic oceans – carbon cycle models
François, Louis ULg; Goddéris, Yves

in Steele, J. H.; Thorpe, S. A.; Turekian, K. K. (Eds.) Encyclopedia of Ocean Sciences (2001)

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See detailPaleoearthquakes from Turbidites in the SISCOR project
Beck, Christian; Hubert, Aurelia ULg

Conference (2011, June 20)

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See detailPaléoécologie du "marbre noir" de Denée
Mottequin, Bernard ULg

Master's dissertation (2000)

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See detailPaleoecology of Rugose corals in the Neffe Formation (Middle Visean) of Belgium
Javaux, Emmanuelle ULg

Conference (1991, September)

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See detailPaléoémersions : processus sédimentaires et diagénétiques associés
Loisy, Corinne; Da Silva, Anne-Christine ULg; Toullec, Renaud et al

in 10ème congrès français de sédimentologie - livret des résumés (2005)

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See detailPaleoenvironmental record of the Amik Basin (Amuq Plain, Southern Turkey) over the last 4000 years
Hubert, Aurelia ULg; El Ouahabi, Meriam ULg; Lebeau, Hélène ULg et al

Poster (2014, February 04)

Continous human occupation is attested in the Amik Basin since 6000-7000 BC. The low-lying Amuq plain is covered by tell settlements first explored by Robert Braidwood in the 1930s. The Basin also is ... [more ▼]

Continous human occupation is attested in the Amik Basin since 6000-7000 BC. The low-lying Amuq plain is covered by tell settlements first explored by Robert Braidwood in the 1930s. The Basin also is crossed by The Dead Sea Fault (DSF), a major neotectonic structure in the Middle East extending from the Red Sea in the south to Turkey in the north. The study focuses on the sedimentary record of the Amik Lake occupying the central part of the Basin. Our objective is to constrain major paleo-environmental changes in the area over the last 4000 years and assess possible human impact. The lake has been drained and progressively dried up since the mid-50s so that it is not watered during the summer season and constitutes a unique opportunity to collect sediment records. Sediments were collected at 1 cm to 2 cm intervals in a trench and in cores up to a depth of 5 meters in the clay deposits. A diverse array of complementary methods is applied to study the records: magnetic susceptibility, grain size, organic matter and inorganic carbon (L.O.I), XRD mineralogy, XRF geochemistry, carbon geochemistry. The age of the record is constrained combining radionuclide and radiocarbon dating. The record shows two intense phases of soil erosion with enrichments in Chromium and Nickel. The most recent erosion phase might be linked with enhanced development during the Roman and the growth of the Antioch City. The oldest one would occur around 3000 BC. The record also allows reconstructing past lake level variations and discusses the results in comparison with variations of the Dead Sea. [less ▲]

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