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Peer Reviewed
See detailImpacts of plant invasions on ecosystem processes in Belgium
Vanderhoeven, Sonia ULiege; Chapuis-Lardy, L.; Dassonville, N. et al

Poster (2004)

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See detailImpacts of the carbonyl group location of ester bond on interfacial properties of sugar-based surfactants: experimental and computational evidences
Razafindralambo, Hary ULiege; Blecker, Christophe ULiege; Mezdour, Samir et al

in Journal of Physical Chemistry B (2009), 113

Interfacial properties of surfactants are dependent on the conformation adopted by the hydrophilic headgroup or/and the hydrophobic tail at the boundary limit of two immiscible phases. Here, we ... [more ▼]

Interfacial properties of surfactants are dependent on the conformation adopted by the hydrophilic headgroup or/and the hydrophobic tail at the boundary limit of two immiscible phases. Here, we demonstrate the impacts of the carbonyl group (-CO-) location of the ester bond of sugar-based surfactants by comparing some properties of two closely related esters, octyl glucuronate and glucose octanoate, at the air-water interface. The carbonyl group location influences the rate and extent of interfacial adsorption and the rheology properties of sugar esters at the air-water interface, which were evaluated by dynamic surface tension and complex surface viscoelastic measurements. Octyl glucuronate adsorbs the fastest at the air-water interface whereas glucose octanoate reduces the dynamic surface tension at the lowest value and exhibits the highest film viscoelasticity. Differences are attributed to molecular conformation constraints inducing relevant changes to the surface coverage kinetic capacity and the interaction strengths of the octyl sugar ester adsorbed films at the air-water interface. All of the results are supported by the minimum cross-sectional area values per molecule determined by both experimental and computational approaches. [less ▲]

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See detailImpacts of the Hara Biosphere Reserve on Livelihood and Welfare in Persian Gulf
Dehghani Pour, Milad; Motiee, Naser; Akbar Barati, Ali et al

in Ecological Economics (2017), 141(November 2017), 7686

Despite the importance of biosphere reserves in Iran's livelihood and welfare, the economic significance of Hara Biosphere Reserve has never been comprehensively studied. This study examines the current ... [more ▼]

Despite the importance of biosphere reserves in Iran's livelihood and welfare, the economic significance of Hara Biosphere Reserve has never been comprehensively studied. This study examines the current importance of Hara Biosphere Reserve (HBR) in local livelihood and welfare. Using a household survey, data were collected through a questionnaire, key informant interviews and direct observations. Two hundred and forty-four households were randomly selected from 10 villages through proportional sampling. Results showed that non-environmental income was the first driver of the total income, poverty alleviation and narrowing income inequality gap. Park income was the second. The results also showed that excluding park income from total income would significantly increase headcount poverty, widen the poverty gap, and raise the Gini coefficient. Wealthier households had the greatest absolute income from the environment, including forest, fishing and fodder. However, the poorest group had smallest absolute income from these sources. Thus, the study demonstrated that wealthier households are responsible for the overharvesting of environmental resources. Interestingly, the study showed that wealthier households are more dependent on profitable environmental incomes sources while the poorest are more dependent on non-profitable ones. [less ▲]

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See detailImpacts of underwater noise on marine vertebrates: Project introduction and first results
Liebschner, Alexander; Seibel, Henrike; Teilmann, Jonas et al

in Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology (2015), 875

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See detailImpacts of unusually high sea ice cover on Antarctic coastal benthic food web structure
Michel, Loïc ULiege; Dubois, Philippe; Eleaume, Marc et al

Conference (2016, April 08)

Antarctica currently undergoes strong and contrasted impacts linked with climate change. While the West Antarctic Peninsula is one of the most rapidly warming regions in the world, resulting in sea ice ... [more ▼]

Antarctica currently undergoes strong and contrasted impacts linked with climate change. While the West Antarctic Peninsula is one of the most rapidly warming regions in the world, resulting in sea ice cover decrease, the sea ice cover of East Antarctica unexpectedly tends to increase, possibly in relation with changes in atmospheric circulation. Changes in sea ice cover are likely to influence benthic food web structure through modifications of benthic-pelagic coupling, disruption of benthic production and/or modifications of benthic community structure (i.e. resource availability for benthic consumers). Here, we studied shallow (0-20 m) benthic food web structure on the coasts of Petrels Island (Adélie Land, East Antarctica) during an event of unusually high spatial and temporal (two successive austral summers without seasonal break-up) sea ice cover. Using stable isotope ratios of C, N and S and the SIAR mixing model, we examined importance of several organic matter sources (benthic macroalgae, benthic biofilm, sympagic algae, suspended particulate organic matter and penguin guano) for nutrition of over 20 taxa of benthic invertebrates (sponges, sea anemones, nemerteans, sessile and mobile polychaetes, gastropods, bivalves, sipunculids, pycnogonids, amphipods, sea stars, sea urchins and sea cucumbers) spanning most present functional guilds. Our results provide insights about how Antarctic benthic consumers, which have evolved in an extremely stable environment, might adapt their feeding habits in response to sudden man-driven changes in environmental conditions and trophic resource availability. [less ▲]

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See detailImpacts of urban expansion on future flood damage: A case study in the River Meuse basin, Belgium
Mustafa, Ahmed; Bruwier, Martin ULiege; Teller, Jacques ULiege et al

in Erpicum, Sébastien; Dewals, Benjamin; Archambeau, Pierre (Eds.) et al Sustainable Hydraulics in the Era of Global Change: Advances in Water Engineering and Research (2016)

Detailed reference viewed: 88 (25 ULiège)
See detailImpacts of vegetation changes on LGM climate
Henrot, Alexandra ULiege; François, Louis ULiege; Munhoven, Guy ULiege

Conference (2007, March 12)

The impacts of vegetation change on the climate at the Last Glacial Maximum are investigated with the Earth System Model of Intermediate Complexity Planet Simulator and the dynamic vegetation model Caraib ... [more ▼]

The impacts of vegetation change on the climate at the Last Glacial Maximum are investigated with the Earth System Model of Intermediate Complexity Planet Simulator and the dynamic vegetation model Caraib (CARbon Assimilation in the Biosphere). [less ▲]

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See detailImpacts of wheel traffic on the physical properties of a Luvisol under reduced and conventional tillage
Saur, Marie-Laure ULiege; Destain, Marie-France ULiege; Roisin, Christian et al

Poster (2016)

Soil compaction is a complex mechanism which results in a decrease of soil porosity and an increase of soil strength. Such effects may reduce crop yield since they are harmful for root growth, germination ... [more ▼]

Soil compaction is a complex mechanism which results in a decrease of soil porosity and an increase of soil strength. Such effects may reduce crop yield since they are harmful for root growth, germination, mesofauna and bacterial life. Soil compaction may also reduce hydraulic conductivity which increases the risk of runoff, contamination of surface water, erosion and emission of greenhouse gases due to anaerobic processes. In the context of sustainable agriculture, it is crucial to characterise the impact of the agricultural techniques on the compaction state in the arable layer due to machine traffic. For this purpose, Soil samples were taken in a Luvisol at different depths, on plots under longterm reduced tillage (RT) and conventional tillage (CT). The impact of wheel traffic on the physical properties of the soils was also studied. The experimental approach consists in measuring traditional macroscopic soil properties such as bulk density and precompression stress, and combining them with pore size distribution obtained by mercury intrusion porosimetry. Automatic cone index measurements were initially performed to map the soil resistance and easily identify the sampling depths. The measurements revealed a plough pan at 30-cm depth under both CT and RT. Nevertheless, the subsoil under RT showed pieces of evidence of a natural regeneration process of the microporosity. The impact of wheel traffic was studied in RT and CT plots. It was shown that the passage of heavy machine such as beet harvester coupled to water content close to the optimum proctor is clearly unfavourable in terms of compaction. The measurements revealed large modifications of soil structure in the topsoil of CT, whereas the soil structure slightly changes through depth. However, the latter remains the more problematic case since the soil will not be loosened by tillage anymore, resulting in strongly compacted soil years after years. In addition to the experimental approach, numerical modelling was used in order to predict the soil compaction. A finite element method was used and the soil behaviour was modelled by an elastoplastic law (modified Cam-Clay model). The model parameters were calibrated from the experimental measurements. The simulations allowed to compare the porosity and the surface deformation after wheel traffic with the experiments. The variations of machine weight and tyre pressure were numerically studied and it was showed that the machine weight has an influence in the topsoil and the subsoil, whereas the tyre pressure affects only the topsoil. [less ▲]

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See detailImpacts of WLG on the regeneration of logged forests: preliminary insights in a Gabonese logging concession
Haurez, Barbara ULiege; Petre, Charles-Albert ULiege; Doucet, Jean-Louis ULiege

in Folia Primatologica : International Journal of Primatology = Internationale Zeitschrift für Primatologie = Journal international de Primatologie (2013, September), 84(3-5), 284-285

Detailed reference viewed: 51 (28 ULiège)
See detailLes impacts socio-économiques des indications géographiques
Fassotte, Bérénice ULiege; Aucuit, Natacha; Parmentier, Isabelle et al

Conference given outside the academic context (2016)

Monter un dossier en vue d’obtenir un label européen AOP ou IGP peut s’avérer fastidieux et long : cela implique un consensus entre producteurs, le cahier des charges comprend un volet technique mais ... [more ▼]

Monter un dossier en vue d’obtenir un label européen AOP ou IGP peut s’avérer fastidieux et long : cela implique un consensus entre producteurs, le cahier des charges comprend un volet technique mais aussi un volet socio-historique, et les étapes de la procédure s’étendent sur de nombreux mois. Les producteurs sont donc en droit de se demander quelles pourront être les retombées de cette labélisation. Cette présentation illustre les impacts socio-économiques des indications géographiques et démontre l’intérêt de ces labels pour les producteurs. [less ▲]

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See detailImpacts socioéconomiques de la migration des chefs de ménage dans la région de Tahoua
Moussa Dit Kalamou, Mahamadou; Andres, Ludovic ULiege; Yamba, Boubacar et al

Conference (2016, December)

Du fait de sa position stratégique entre l’Afrique du Nord et l’Afrique subsaharienne, le Niger est une terre d’intense mobilité par le départ et le transit de nombreux migrants dont le flux venait de ... [more ▼]

Du fait de sa position stratégique entre l’Afrique du Nord et l’Afrique subsaharienne, le Niger est une terre d’intense mobilité par le départ et le transit de nombreux migrants dont le flux venait de tous les pays de l’Afrique de l’Ouest. Le contexte géopolitique actuellement dominé par l’insécurité dans la partie Est du pays et le nord du Nigeria voisin (guerre imposée par la nébuleuse Boko Haram) ; et l’instabilité des pays frontaliers à l’Ouest (Mali) et au Nord (Libye) poussent les populations à chercher refuge en migrant massivement (plus de 60% des migrants en direction du Maghreb et l’Europe passent par le Niger selon l’Organisation Internationale pour les Migrations) et irrégulièrement vers les grandes villes minières du nord du Niger (Agadez, Arlit, Djado et Dirkou) qui sont les portes d’accès au pays de l’Afrique du Nord et ensuite à la méditerranée afin d’atteindre les pays européens. A tous ces problèmes sécuritaires, s’ajoute le problème d’insécurité alimentaire et foncière qui oblige les populations rurales comme celles de la région de Tahoua à migrer pour un exode temporaire ou saisonnier qui finira par une migration de longue durée à force de prendre goût à l’aventure. Les ruraux qui font face aux déficits cycliques imposés par le changement climatique vont à la recherche du mieux-être et du complément alimentaire des ménages. Cet article traite de l’exode qui sera considéré comme une migration locale et en même temps une initiation à la migration régionale et intercontinentale. Il ressortira les impacts socio-économiques de l’exode agissant sur les ménages dans la région de Tahoua au Niger. [less ▲]

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See detailImpact of sludge storage duration on its dewatering and drying ability
Pambou, Yvon-Bert; Salmon, Thierry ULiege; Fraikin, Laurent ULiege et al

Poster (2013, October)

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See detailImpaired LTP induction in dentate gyrus of calretinin-deficient mice
Schurmans, Stéphane ULiege; Schiffmann, S. N.; Gurden, H. et al

in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (1997), 94

Calretinin (Cr) is a Ca21 binding protein present in various populations of neurons distributed in the central and peripheral nervous systems. We have generated Cr-deficient (Cr2/2) mice by gene targeting ... [more ▼]

Calretinin (Cr) is a Ca21 binding protein present in various populations of neurons distributed in the central and peripheral nervous systems. We have generated Cr-deficient (Cr2/2) mice by gene targeting and have investigated the associated phenotype. Cr2/2 mice were viable, and a large number of morphological, biochemical, and behavioral parameters were found unaffected. In the normal mouse hippocampus, Cr is expressed in a widely distributed subset of GABAergic interneurons and in hilar mossy cells of the dentate gyrus. Because both types of cells are part of local pathways innervating dentate granule cells andyor pyramidal neurons, we have explored in Cr2/2 mice the synaptic transmission between the perforant pathway and granule cells and at the Schaffer commissural input to CA1 pyramidal neurons. Cr2/2 mice showed no alteration in basal synaptic transmission, but long-term potentiation (LTP) was impaired in the dentate gyrus. Normal LTP could be restored in the presence of the GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline, suggesting that in Cr2/2 dentate gyrus an excess of g-minobutyric acid (GABA) release interferes with LTP induction. Synaptic transmission and LTP were normal in CA1 area, which contains only few Cr-positive GABAergic interneurons. Cr2/2 mice performed normally in spatial memory task. These results suggest that expression of Cr contributes to the control of synaptic plasticity in mouse dentate gyrus by indirectly regulating the activity of GABAergic interneurons, and that Cr2/2 mice represent a useful tool to understand the role of dentate LTP in learning and memory [less ▲]

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See detailImpaired Accumulation of Granulocytes in the Lung During Ozone Adaptation
Fievez, Laurence ULiege; Kirschvink, N.; Dogne, S. et al

in Free Radical Biology & Medicine (2001), 31(5), 633-641

Respiratory alterations induced by an acute exposure to ozone (O(3)) paradoxically resolve during multiday exposure. This adaptation is characteristically accompanied by a gradual attenuation of lung ... [more ▼]

Respiratory alterations induced by an acute exposure to ozone (O(3)) paradoxically resolve during multiday exposure. This adaptation is characteristically accompanied by a gradual attenuation of lung neutrophilia. As maintenance of neutrophilia at the site of inflammation is due to cytokine-mediated delayed neutrophil apoptosis, which is associated with reduced levels of Bax, a proapoptotic protein, we sought to determine whether defects in these mechanisms could account for O(3) adaptation. Lung granulocytes obtained at different time points from calves exposed to 0.75 ppm O(3) for 12 h/d for 7 consecutive days neither showed enhancement of survival nor Bax deficiency, when compared to blood granulocytes. To further investigate the effects of an exogenous oxidative stress on neutrophil survival, human granulocytes were treated with hydrogen peroxide alone, or in combination with granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor, an antiapoptotic cytokine. Both treatments led to rapid apoptosis associated with downregulation of Bcl-x(L) and Bcl-2, two antiapoptotic proteins. This study shows that O(3) adaptation is associated with a failure in the mechanisms leading to accumulation of neutrophils at the site of inflammation, and suggests that this defect is due to direct proapoptotic effects of exogenous oxidative stress on granulocytes [less ▲]

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