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See detailNietzsche et le langage : une herméneutique vitaliste par-delà les mots
Remacle, François ULg

Master's dissertation (2011)

Detailed reference viewed: 36 (1 ULg)
See detailHet nieuwe echtscheidingsrecht: volgzaam en toch vooruitstrevend
Leleu, Yves-Henri ULg

in Verschelden, G. (Ed.) Echtscheiding (2010)

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See detailNieuwe Europese richtlijnen voor de behandeling van arteriele hypertensie: plaats van laaggedoseerde combinatiepreparaten
Krzesinski, Jean-Marie ULg

in Journal de Cardiologie [= JDC] = Tijdschrift voor Cardiologie [= TVC] (2003), 15(8), 295-299

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See detailDe nieuwe fairness tax: EU- en verdragsconform ?
Peeters, Bart ULg

in Fiscologue International (2014), 361

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See detailDe nieuwe fiscale antimisbruikregel en de gevolgen voor vermogensplanning
Bourgeois, Marc ULg; Nollet, Aymeric ULg

E-print/Working paper (2012)

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See detailNieuwe nestjes
Spinoy, Erik ULg

Article for general public (2006)

This is a review of an important new history of postwar Dutch literature.

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See detailEen nieuwe verspreidingsatlas van de loopkevers en zandloopkevers (Carabidae) in België.
Desender, Konjev; Dekoninck, W.; Maes, Dirk et al

Book published by Instituut voor Natuur- en Bosonderzooek (2008)

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See detailNifedipine : an update of its therapeutic efficacy in pulmonary hypertension
EL ALLAF; D'Orio, Vincenzo ULg; CARLIER, J

in Cardiovascular Reviews & Reports (1984)

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See detailNifedipine in secondary pulmonary hypertension
GARZANITI, N; EL ALLAF, D; D'Orio, Vincenzo ULg et al

in Clinical Respiratory Physiology (1982), 18

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See detailNifedipine nanocrystals: pharmacokinetic evaluation in the rat and permeability studies in Caco-2/HT29-5M21 (co)-cultures
Hecq, Julien; Nollevaux, Géraldine; Deleers, M. et al

in Journal of Drug Delivery Science and Technology (2006), 16(6, NOV-DEC), 437-442

Poorly water-soluble drugs such as nifedipine (NIF) (similar to 20 mu g/mL) offer challenging problems in drug formulation as poor solubility is generally associated with poor dissolution characteristics ... [more ▼]

Poorly water-soluble drugs such as nifedipine (NIF) (similar to 20 mu g/mL) offer challenging problems in drug formulation as poor solubility is generally associated with poor dissolution characteristics and thus with poor oral bioavailability (BCS class H drugs). In order to enhance these characteristics, formulation of NIF as nanocrystals was carried out. NIF nanoparticles (NP) were prepared using high-pressure homogenization (HPH). Solubility and dissolution characteristics have been reported in previous work to be significantly enhanced for NIF NP. Influence of NIF particle size on NIF permeation rate across intestinal cell models (Caco-2 and HT29-5M21 cultures and co-cultures) was investigated in order to complement these promising in vitro data. Apical to basolateral transfer studies were carried out across Caco-2 and HT29-5M21 cultures and co-cultures. Caco-2/HT29-5M21 co-cultures (seeding ratio 3: 1) were evaluated to better represent in vivo intestinal conditions. The influence of chitosan in the NIF NP formulation with regard to in vitro NIF permeation rate was also evaluated. These studies showed that NIF permeation rate across the different in vitro models evaluated can be significantly enhanced (approximate to 6-fold) by formulation of NIF as nanoparticles. No significant difference was observed either in the presence of chitosan in the formulation or between the three cell models evaluated. To complement these observations, preliminary in vivo pharmacokinetic evaluations in Sprague-Dawley rats, in the fed and fasted states, were also carried out for both un-milled NIF and NIF NP. [less ▲]

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See detailNifurzide, a nitrofuran antiinfectious agent: interaction with Escherichia coli cells.
Delsarte, Anne; Faway, Michel; Frère, Jean-Marie et al

in Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (1981), 19(3), 477-86

This paper presents a study of the interactions between Escherichia coli cells and nifurzide, a nitrofuran derivative which is used as an intestinal antiinfectious agent. At low concentrations of ... [more ▼]

This paper presents a study of the interactions between Escherichia coli cells and nifurzide, a nitrofuran derivative which is used as an intestinal antiinfectious agent. At low concentrations of nifurzide, the growth rate of the cultures decreased, and elongated, nonseptate cells appeared. At high concentrations, complete growth inhibition occurred, accompanied by a rather strong bactericidal effect, but the appearance of the cells was normal; in particular, no bacteriolytic effect was observed. A very large number of antibiotic molecules were bound per bacterial cell. After cell disruption, similar amounts of nifurzide were found in the cytoplasm, cytoplasmic membranes, and cell wall, respectively. Most of the bound nifurzide was rapidly degraded or became protein bound. The structure of the outer membrane lipopolysaccharide appeared to have little influence on the activity of nifurzide. [less ▲]

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See detailNigella sativa L. : Chemical composition and characteristics of its lipid fraction.
Cheikh Rouhou, S.; Besbes, Souhail; Hentati, B. et al

Poster (2006, March)

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See detailNigella sativa L.: Chemical composition and physicochemical characteristics of lipid fraction
Cheikh-Rouhou, Salma; Besbes, Souhail; Hentati, Basma et al

in Food Chemistry (2007), 101(2), 673-681

Physicochemical properties of two Nigella seed varieties, having a Tunisian and Iranian origin, were determined. Physical and chemical analyses of crude oils extracted from the seeds by a cold solvent ... [more ▼]

Physicochemical properties of two Nigella seed varieties, having a Tunisian and Iranian origin, were determined. Physical and chemical analyses of crude oils extracted from the seeds by a cold solvent method were also performed. The following results (on a dry-weight basis) were obtained for Tunisian and Iranian varieties, respectively: protein 26.7% and 22.6%, oil 28.48% and 40.35%, ash 4.86% and 4.41%, and total carbohydrate 40.0% and 32.7%. The major unsaturated fatty acids were linoleic acid (50.3-49.2%), followed by oleic acid (25.0 23.7%), while the main saturated fatty acid was palmitic acid (17.2-18.4%). Myristic, myristoleic, palmitoleic, margaric, margaroleic, stearic, linolenic, arachidic, eicosenoic, behenic and lignoceric acids were also detected. Thermal profiles of both Nigella seed varieties, determined by their DSC melting curves, revealed different thermograms. Sensorial profiles of Tunisian and Iranian seed oils were defined through the CieLab (L-*, a(*), b(*)) colour, oxidative stability by Rancimat test and viscosity. Physicochemical properties of the oils for Tunisian and Iranian varieties, respectively, include: saponification number 211 and 217, peroxide value 5.65 and 4.35, iodine index 120 and 101, and an acidity of 22.7% and 18.6%. Results suggested that Nigella seed oil could deserve further consideration and investigation as a potential new multi-purpose product for industrial, cosmetic and pharmaceutical uses. (c) 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detail"'Nigeria is Bus is Stage': The Bus as Metaphor in Contemporary Nigerian Fiction"
Tunca, Daria ULg

in Commonwealth : Essays and Studies (2008), 30(2), 35-48

This essay takes as its central argument that the bus can be viewed as a metaphor for the nation in Ben Okri’s "Stars of the New Curfew" and Karen King-Aribisala’s Kicking Tongues. The article unveils the ... [more ▼]

This essay takes as its central argument that the bus can be viewed as a metaphor for the nation in Ben Okri’s "Stars of the New Curfew" and Karen King-Aribisala’s Kicking Tongues. The article unveils the numerous lexical and narrative correspondences between the realms of politics and public transport contained in the texts, and highlights how these associations interact with references to the stage to produce different, yet equally powerful, comments on contemporary Nigerian society. [less ▲]

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See detailNight sky photography -- H. J. P. Arnold
Manfroid, Jean ULg

in Ciel et Terre (1989), 105

Not Available

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See detailNight-time airflow in a forest canopy near a mountain crest
Sedlak, Pavel; Aubinet, Marc ULg; Heinesch, Bernard ULg et al

in Agricultural and Forest Meteorology (2010), 150(5), 736-744

Night-time airflow within a deep and dense canopy near the top of a mountain ridge is investigated based on measurements at Bily Kriz, Czech Republic. The site is characterized by a young Norway spruce ... [more ▼]

Night-time airflow within a deep and dense canopy near the top of a mountain ridge is investigated based on measurements at Bily Kriz, Czech Republic. The site is characterized by a young Norway spruce forest on a 13 degrees slope and the occurrence of almost exclusively upslope or downslope flows. The forest canopy reaches the ground surface. A decoupled two-layer structure of canopy flow typically develops at night. While the above-canopy flow is most frequently an upslope-directed larger-scale flow over the ridge, the lower-canopy flow is downslope (katabatic). However, the lower-canopy flow can be forced upslope when the wind speed above the canopy exceeds a well-defined limit. Less frequently, on the lee slope to the larger-scale flow, both the above-canopy and the lower-canopy flow are usually downslope, although a flow reversal in the lower canopy is also observed, accompanied with a large shear stress (friction velocity) above the canopy. The occurrence of opposing flows is not limited to sunset/sunrise transition periods. In a simplified modelling approach to the dynamics of the nocturnal lower-canopy flow decoupled from above, local equilibrium is assumed of solely two opposing driving forces - one induced by the negative buoyancy (due to radiative cooling of the canopy) and the other by the hydrodynamic pressure gradient (resulting from the larger-scale flow over the ridge) - and the canopy drag as a retarding force. The diagnostic model gives realistic values of the major driving terms for Bily Kriz, and the downslope or upslope direction and speed of the lower-canopy flow that agree well with the measurements. The model contributes to better interpretation of the experimental results, which are in accordance with recent publications on the flow patterns on forested hills. Knowledge of the lower-canopy flow behaviour and of the degree of its decoupling from the flow aloft is necessary for assessing the contribution of advection to the CO2 budget at sloping forest sites, and for analysis of the flux footprint. (C) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailNightglow investigation around 1.27 µm with VIRTIS/Venus-Express
Migliorini, A.; Piccioni, G.; Gérard, Jean-Claude ULg et al

Conference (2010, December)

In this study we report about the investigation of the spectral region 1.22-1.32 µm of the night side of Venus, observed by the VIRTIS instrument (Visible and InfraRed Spectral Imaging Spectrometer) on ... [more ▼]

In this study we report about the investigation of the spectral region 1.22-1.32 µm of the night side of Venus, observed by the VIRTIS instrument (Visible and InfraRed Spectral Imaging Spectrometer) on board the Venus Express spacecraft. This spectral region is characterized by the presence of the extensively studied (a1Δg – X3Σg-) (0,0) O2 nightglow band, the most intense emission observed on the night side of Venus. However, the comparison between data and synthetic spectra from the (0,0) band only, lacks a good match at wavelengths longer than 1.27 μm, especially in the region around 1.28-1.29 μm. The effects of temperature, CO2 and the (8,5) OH emission at 1.28 µm were investigated as a possible cause to the spectral disagreement, but they all are not enough to explain the observed difference. Instrumental effects were also excluded as possible cause of the mismatch. We found that the inclusion of the (1,1) band O2 emission in the synthetic spectra, originating from the upper vibrational level ν=1 of the (a1Δg – X3Σg-) transition centered at 1.28 μm, in addition to the (0,0), significantly improves the agreement between simulated spectra and observed data in the region at 1.28-1.29 μm. A synthetic spectrum, including the (0,0) and the (1,1) is produced and compared to 4 observed VIRTIS spectra, as an example. From the analyzed data, it results that the (1,1) band with an intensity ranging from the 8 to 15% of the (0,0) band is required to best reproduce the observed VIRTIS spectra. This corresponds to a (1,1) band intensity equal to 3.1-5.8 MR, in limb view, in agreement with the upper limit set by Connes et al., (1979), on their ground-based observations of the oxygen nightglow of Venus. [less ▲]

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See detailNightglow investigation in the Visible Range with the VIRTIS/Venus-Express instrument
Migliorini, A.; Slanger, T.; Saran, D. et al

Poster (2011, December)

In this study we report the investigation of the nightglow molecular oxygen emissions of Venus in the visible spectral range, observed by the VIRTIS instrument (Visible and InfraRed Spectral Imaging ... [more ▼]

In this study we report the investigation of the nightglow molecular oxygen emissions of Venus in the visible spectral range, observed by the VIRTIS instrument (Visible and InfraRed Spectral Imaging Spectrometer) on board the Venus Express spacecraft. The Herzberg II system was detected in the range 0.4-0.7 µm. The observed bands peak at 95-96 km altitude, with a limb mode intensity of 15-20 kR for the strongest band, similar to that seen in previous observations. Simultaneous observations in the visible and IR [O2 (a-X) 1.27 µm band] were obtained in March 2007, and the two systems are similar in peak altitude. In addition, three bands of the O2 Chamberlain system, at 0.558, 0.604, and 0.657 µm were detected. They are well detached from the Herzberg II bands, and more distinct than reported in previous observations (Garcia Munoz et al., 2009). A simulated spectrum is obtained using the DIATOM code, allowing accurate reproduction of the observed VIRTIS mean spectrum. [less ▲]

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See detailNightside polar cap boundary and the auroral electrojets
Pitkanen; Aikio, Anita; Amm, Olaf et al

in 37th COSPAR Scientific Assembly (2008)

We present several event studies of the relation between the polar cap boundary (PCB) and the auroral electrojets in the nightside ionosphere. The PCB was determined by the EISCAT incoherent scatter radar ... [more ▼]

We present several event studies of the relation between the polar cap boundary (PCB) and the auroral electrojets in the nightside ionosphere. The PCB was determined by the EISCAT incoherent scatter radar measurements and the east-west equivalent electrojets were derived from the MIRACLE magnetometer data by using the 1-D upward continuation. In several cases, the PCB location in relation to the Harang discontinuity was examined, and comparisons to satellite imagery data of the auroral oval were made. For some of the events, the ionospheric reconnection electric field could be estimated as a measure of the nightside reconnection rate and its variation was studied. [less ▲]

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See detailNightside reconnection at Jupiter: Auroral and magnetic field observations from 26 July 1998
Radioti, Aikaterini ULg; Grodent, Denis ULg; Gérard, Jean-Claude ULg et al

in Journal of Geophysical Research. Space Physics (2011), 116

In this study we present ultraviolet and infrared auroral data from 26 July 1998, and we show the presence of transient auroral polar spots observed throughout the postdusk to predawn local time sector ... [more ▼]

In this study we present ultraviolet and infrared auroral data from 26 July 1998, and we show the presence of transient auroral polar spots observed throughout the postdusk to predawn local time sector. The polar dawn spots, which are transient polar features observed in the dawn sector poleward of the main emission, were previously associated with the inward moving flow resulting from tail reconnection. In the present study we suggest that nightside spots, which are polar features observed close to the midnight sector, are related to inward moving flow, like the polar dawn spots. We base our conclusions on the near-simultaneous set of Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and Galileo observations of 26 July 1998, during which HST observed a nightside spot magnetically mapped close to the location of an inward moving flow detected by Galileo on the same day. We derive the emitted power from magnetic field measurements along the observed plasma flow bubble, and we show that it matches the emitted power inferred from HST. Additionally, this study reports for the first time a bright polar spot in the infrared, which could be a possible signature of tail reconnection. The spot appears within an interval of 30 min from the ultraviolet, poleward of the main emission on the ionosphere and in the postdusk sector planetward of the tail reconnection x line on the equatorial plane. Finally, the present work demonstrates that ionospheric signatures of flow bursts released during tail reconnection are instantaneously detected over a wide local time sector. [less ▲]

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