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See detailAssessment of lipoxygenase activity in seed extracts from 35 plant species
Fauconnier, Marie-Laure ULg; Vanzeveren, E.; Marlier, Michel et al

in Grasas y Aceites (1995), 46(1), 6-10

Lipoxyganase activity in 35 seed extracts was determined an the basis of hydroperoxide synthesis using linoleic acid as substrate. The results referring to the extracted protein content show that several ... [more ▼]

Lipoxyganase activity in 35 seed extracts was determined an the basis of hydroperoxide synthesis using linoleic acid as substrate. The results referring to the extracted protein content show that several species of Vigna (V. unguiculata, V. radiata and V. mungo) and one of Trifolium exhibit stronger lipoxygenase activity than soybean enzyme extracts. The pH-activity relationship was also established for 4 very active samples. GCMS analysis revealed equal amounts of 9- and 13 hydroperoxides of linoleic acid In these seed extracts, indicating no enzyme positional specificity. [less ▲]

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See detailAssessment of long-term safety and efficacy of etanercept in a 5-year extension study in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.
Klareskog, L.; Gaubitz, M.; Rodriguez-Valverde, V. et al

in Clin Exp Rheumatol. 2011 Mar-Apr (2011)

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See detailAssessment of lumbopelvic movement control in tennis players with and without low back pain
GROSDENT, Stéphanie ULg; Demoulin, Christophe ULg; Lemaire, Vincent et al

Poster (2012, October)

Relevance: LBP is common among tennis players. More than one third of professional tennis players reported LBP as reason for missing at least one tournament. As impaired lumbar motor functions have been ... [more ▼]

Relevance: LBP is common among tennis players. More than one third of professional tennis players reported LBP as reason for missing at least one tournament. As impaired lumbar motor functions have been associated with LBP, it appears particularly relevant to assess lumbopelvic movement control in tennis players. Methods: Twenty amateur tennis players (male, 22.9 ± 3.0 years) were included. Subjects were pooled into two groups: 10 players with chronic LBP (mean pain duration: 3.1 ± 2.6 years, pain severity score: 3.5/10 on a pain visual analogue scale) and 10 players without LBP. The Bent Knee Fall Out (BKFO) test was used to assess the players’ ability to control movement of lumbopelvic region. BKFO was performed in supine position and monitored by means of two pressure biofeedback units inflated to 40 mmHg and positioned under the lumbar spine of the participant. The reliability of this test has been previously assessed. Players were instructed to make an active abduction-external rotation movement of the hip (45°) without concomitant lumbopelvic movement of the pelvis and low back. Pressure modification (mmHg) was recorded, each side was assessed. Results: Tennis players with LBP had a worse lumbopelvic movement control than players without LBP both for dominant (9.0 mm Hg vs 3.4 mmHg, P<0.05) as well for the non-dominant side (9.1 mmHg vs 4.6 mmHg, P<0.05). Conclusions: Tennis players with LBP experience similar alterations of motor control as those observed in sedentary people with LBP. However, it remains unclear if these alterations are the cause of the consequence of chronic LBP. Implications: Further prospective studies should assess the cause or effect relationship and should determine whether motor control exercises are effective in tennis players with chronic LBP. [less ▲]

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See detailAssessment of mechanobiological models for the numerical simulation of tissue differentiation around immediately loaded implants.
Geris, Liesbet ULg; Van Oosterwyck, H.; Vander Sloten, J. et al

in Computer Methods in Biomechanics & Biomedical Engineering (2003), 6(5-6), 277-88

Nowadays, there is a growing consensus on the impact of mechanical loading on bone biology. A bone chamber provides a mechanically isolated in vivo environment in which the influence of different ... [more ▼]

Nowadays, there is a growing consensus on the impact of mechanical loading on bone biology. A bone chamber provides a mechanically isolated in vivo environment in which the influence of different parameters on the tissue response around loaded implants can be investigated. This also provides data to assess the feasibility of different mechanobiological models that mathematically describe the mechanoregulation of tissue differentiation. Before comparing numerical results to animal experimental results, it is necessary to investigate the influence of the different model parameters on the outcome of the simulations. A 2D finite element model of the tissue inside the bone chamber was created. The differentiation models developed by Prendergast, et al. ["Biophysical stimuli on cells during tissue differentiation at implant interfaces", Journal of Biomechanics, 30(6), (1997), 539-548], Huiskes et al. ["A biomechanical regulatory model for periprosthetic fibrous-tissue differentiation", Journal of Material Science: Materials in Medicine, 8 (1997) 785-788] and by Claes and Heigele ["Magnitudes of local stress and strain along bony surfaces predict the course and type of fracture healing", Journal of Biomechanics, 32(3), (1999) 255-266] were implemented and integrated in the finite element code. The fluid component in the first model has an important effect on the predicted differentiation patterns. It has a direct effect on the predicted degree of maturation of bone and a substantial indirect effect on the simulated deformations and hence the predicted phenotypes of the tissue in the chamber. Finally, the presence of fluid also causes time-dependent behavior. Both models lead to qualitative and quantitative differences in predicted differentiation patterns. Because of the different nature of the tissue phenotypes used to describe the differentiation processes, it is however hard to compare both models in terms of their validity. [less ▲]

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See detailAssessment of microbiological criteria for regular checks of faecal contamination and general hygiene in Belgian establishments producing meat
Ghafir, Yasmine; Daube, Georges ULg; Dierick, Katleen et al

in Sciences des Aliments (2003), 23(1), 104-106

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See detailAssessment of milk yield losses and subclinical mastitis risk factors using bulk milk somatic cell counts in dairy herds
Mtaallah, Brahim; Oubey, Zied; Hammami, Hedi ULg

in Revue de Médecine Vétérinaire (2002), 153(4), 251-260

A prospective study, involving 21 selected dairy farms in north of Tunisia, was conducted to asses the loss of milk production due to high levels bulk tank somatic cell count and to find some relationship ... [more ▼]

A prospective study, involving 21 selected dairy farms in north of Tunisia, was conducted to asses the loss of milk production due to high levels bulk tank somatic cell count and to find some relationship between risk factors and subclinical mastitis. We found that the mean of bulk milk somatic cell count was 626 103 cell/ml. Using a simple statistical model, the average loss of milk due to levels bulk tank somatic cell count was 524 kg per cow per year. Using method of mean comparisons, risk factors associated to high levels bulk tank somatic cell count was: Livestock farming risk factors : inadequacy bedding area; inadequacy cleaning bedding and scrapping area. Milking risk factors : washing teat with a shower no adjustable flow and without wipe with individuel towel milk shift work above five per cow-herd; no stripping squirts of milk before milking; milking healthy and mastitis cows at the same time; no teat dipping. [less ▲]

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See detailAssessment of modelling uncertainties in long-term climate and sea level change projections "Aster"
Fichefet, T.; Loutre, M.-F.; Goosse, H. et al

Report (2009)

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See detailASsessment of modelling uncertainties in long-TERm climate and sea level change projections"Aster" : final report
Fichefet, T; Loutre, M.-F.; Goosse, H. et al

Report (2012)

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See detailAssessment of modelling uncertainties in long-term climate projections: the ASTER project
Loutre, M. F.; Mouchet, Anne ULg; Fichefet, T. et al

Conference (2010, October)

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See detailAssessment of monomeric human calcitonin extraction by SEP-PAK C18
Fontaine, MA; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Gaspar, S et al

in Revue du Rhumatisme et des Maladies Osteo-Articulaires (1992), 59

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See detailAssessment of muscle oxygenation in the horse by near infrared spectroscopy
Pringle, John; Roberts, C.; Art, Tatiana ULg et al

in Equine Veterinary Journal (2000), 32(1), 59-64

This study examined the ability of near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) to noninvasively determine changes to muscle oxygenation in the resting horse. Five horses had (NIRS) performed over extremity muscle ... [more ▼]

This study examined the ability of near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) to noninvasively determine changes to muscle oxygenation in the resting horse. Five horses had (NIRS) performed over extremity muscle while under general anaesthesia, first with 8 min limb ischaemia, then systemic hypoxaemia for 5 min. A second group of 6 awake horses had NIRS performed over extremity muscle while being administered hypoxic gas (F(I)O2 0.10) for 5 min, and after return to steady state, limb ischaemia was induced for an additional 5 min. In the anaesthetised horses' ischaemia induced marked and significant muscle deoxygenation of haemoglobin/myoglobin (P<0.01), with corresponding arterial saturation decreasing from 98.9 to 81.9%. Hypoxaemia induced small yet significant muscle deoxygenation (P<0.01) that was 3.2% of the ischaemia deoxygenation signal, with a corresponding decrease in arterial saturation from 98.6 to 90.4%. In the awake horses muscle deoxygenation was not detectable during hypoxia despite reduction of arterial saturation from 97.8 to 86.8%, whereas ischaemia induced rapid and significant deoxygenation of muscle (P<0.05), with corresponding reduction of venous saturation from 78.4 to 75.4%. In neither group of horses was there evidence of cytochrome aa3 reduction, despite complete ischaemia for up to 8 min. NIRS changes in the resting horse muscle clearly differed between ischaemia and hypoxaemia, and can readily show muscle deoxygenation in clinically relevant hypoxaemia in the horse under anaesthesia. Further, as the deoxygenation signal induced by ischaemia was clearly detectable above a background movement artefact, NIRS application to study of muscle oxygenation in the working horse should be explored. [less ▲]

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See detailAssessment of Mytilus galloprovincialis to monitor 19 trace elements in the Calvi Bay
Richir, Jonathan ULg; Vermeulen, Simon; Biondo, Renzo ULg et al

Poster (2011, December 08)

Mussel caging with Mytilus galloprovincialis has been successively used to monitor classic trace metal (Cd, Cu, Zn, Cr, Fe, Ni, Pb) pollution of Mediterranean coastal waters at spatial scales ranging from ... [more ▼]

Mussel caging with Mytilus galloprovincialis has been successively used to monitor classic trace metal (Cd, Cu, Zn, Cr, Fe, Ni, Pb) pollution of Mediterranean coastal waters at spatial scales ranging from 10 to 100km. However, its relevance as bioindicator at smaller scales (100 m - 1 km) is poorly known. Moreover, the levels of some little studied trace elements (Al, V, Mn, Sb, Sn, Ag, Mo, Se, As, Co, Be, Bi), recently identified as potential pollutants of coastal environments, have not yet been assessed in that species. In this work, M. galloprovincialis was used to monitor the 19 listed trace elements at the scale of the Calvi Bay (NW Corsica, France). Additionally, we investigated decontamination kinetics and trace element tissue speciation before and after spawning. Mytilus galloprovincialis trace element levels reflect the good water quality of the Calvi Bay, showing little spatial variations either at 100m or 1km scales. Filter feeders are only influenced by their relatively homogeneous pelagic environment (dissolved trace elements and suspended particulate matters), in contrast to organisms which inhabit typically heterogeneous benthic habitats. This bioindicator, a convincing candidate for the monitoring of the 12 little studied trace elements, effectively accumulates the 19 studied elements to 105 seawater concentrations. Mytilus galloprovincialis rapidly equilibrates (within days) with its environment, and is therefore a good indicator of chronic and stable chemical pollutions. Tissue speciation shows that the most relevant organ to monitor trace elements is the hepatopancreas. However, the important variability induced by the reproductive cycle of mussels requires using this bioindicator during its sexual dormancy. [less ▲]

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See detailAssessment of new biocompatible Poly(N-(morpholino)ethyl methacrylate)-based copolymers by transfection of immortalized keratinoc
Van Overstraeten-Schlögel, Nancy; Shim, Yong Ho; Tevel, Virginie et al

in Drug Delivery (2012), 16(2), 102-111

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See detailAssessment of new-generation glistening-free hydrophobic acrylic intraocular lens material
Pagnoulle, Christophe; Bozukova, Dimitriya; Gobin, Laure et al

in Journal of Cataract & Refractive Surgery (2012), 38

To determine the hydrophobic, antiglistening, and bioadhesiveness properties of a new polymer, GF rawmaterial, and to determine the suitability of thismaterial for use in intraocular lenses (IOLs).

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See detailThe assessment of nociceptive and non-nociceptive skin sensitivity in the Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica)
Evrard, H. C.; Balthazart, Jacques ULg

in Journal of Neuroscience Methods (2002), 116(2), 135-146

We evaluated the efficacy of two nociceptive tests, the hot water (HWT) and the foot pressure tests (FPT), and one non-nociceptive test (Semmes-Weinstein test, SWT) in assessing skin sensitivity in ... [more ▼]

We evaluated the efficacy of two nociceptive tests, the hot water (HWT) and the foot pressure tests (FPT), and one non-nociceptive test (Semmes-Weinstein test, SWT) in assessing skin sensitivity in conscious Japanese quail. All stimuli elicited a reflex-like, strongly reproducible response. Responses in the HWT and FPT were identified as typical nocifensive flight-fight behavior. In untreated birds, these responses occurred at temperatures and forces described previously as noxious. In the SWT, two responses were observed: a slight ruffling of the cloacal gland feathers due to the stimulation of the cloacal gland, and a brief extension of the limbs due to the stimulation of the ilium or pectoral apterium. These reactions occurred at intensities recognized as innocuous. Morphine significantly altered the response latency and threshold in the HWT and FPT, but had no effect in the SWT. However, the SWT response threshold was significantly increased by local application of xylocaine. Taken together, the pattern of the responses, the intensities and the effects of morphine and xylocaine allowed to distinguish between nociceptive and non-nociceptive tests. They also demonstrate the efficacy of these tests to evaluate skin sensitivity in quail and to assess its modulation by chemical factors that affect somatosensory processes. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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