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See detailModelling BSE trend over time in europe, a risk assessment perspective
Ducrot, C.; Sala, C.; Ru, G. et al

in European Journal of Epidemiology (2010)

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See detailModelling carbon fluxes of forest and grassland ecosystems in Western Europe using the CARAIB dynamic vegetation model: evaluation against eddy covariance data.
Henrot, Alexandra-Jane ULg; François, Louis ULg; Dury, Marie ULg et al

in Geophysical Research Abstracts (2015, April), 17

Eddy covariance measurements are an essential resource to understand how ecosystem carbon fluxes react in response to climate change, and to help to evaluate and validate the performance of land surface ... [more ▼]

Eddy covariance measurements are an essential resource to understand how ecosystem carbon fluxes react in response to climate change, and to help to evaluate and validate the performance of land surface and vegetation models at regional and global scale. In the framework of the MASC project (« Modelling and Assessing Surface Change impacts on Belgian and Western European climate »), vegetation dynamics and carbon fluxes of forest and grassland ecosystems simulated by the CARAIB dynamic vegetation model (Dury et al., iForest - Biogeosciences and Forestry, 4:82-99, 2011) are evaluated and validated by comparison of the model predictions with eddy covariance data. Here carbon fluxes (e.g. net ecosystem exchange (NEE), gross primary productivity (GPP), and ecosystem respiration (RECO)) and evapotranspiration (ET) simulated with the CARAIB model are compared with the fluxes measured at several eddy covariance flux tower sites in Belgium and Western Europe, chosen from the FLUXNET global network (http://fluxnet.ornl.gov/). CARAIB is forced either with surface atmospheric variables derived from the global CRU climatology, or with in situ meteorological data. Several tree (e.g. Pinus sylvestris, Fagus sylvatica, Picea abies) and grass species (e.g. Poaceae, Asteraceae) are simulated, depending on the species encountered on the studied sites. The aim of our work is to assess the model ability to reproduce the daily, seasonal and interannual variablility of carbon fluxes and the carbon dynamics of forest and grassland ecosystems in Belgium and Western Europe. [less ▲]

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See detailModelling chemical weathering at river catchment scale: design and calibration of the WiTCh model
Probst, A.; Godderis, Y.; François, Louis ULg et al

in Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta (2002), 66(15A), 615-615

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See detailModelling chemo-hydro-mechanical behaviour of unsaturated clays: a feasibility study
Liu, Z.; Boukpeti, Nathalie; Li, Xikui ULg et al

in International Journal for Numerical and Analytical Methods in Geomechanics (2005), 29(9), 919-940

Effective capabilities of combined chemo-elasto-plastic and unsaturated soil models to simulate chemohydro-mechanical (CHM) behaviour of clays are examined in numerical simulations through selected ... [more ▼]

Effective capabilities of combined chemo-elasto-plastic and unsaturated soil models to simulate chemohydro-mechanical (CHM) behaviour of clays are examined in numerical simulations through selected boundary value problems. The objective is to investigate the feasibility of approaching such complex material behaviour numerically by combining two existing models. The chemo-mechanical effects are described using the concept of chemical softening consisting of reduction of the pre-consolidation pressure proposed originally by Hueckel (Can. Geotech. J. 1992; 29:1071-1086; Int. J. Numer. Anal. Methods Geomech. 1997; 21:43-72). An additional chemical softening mechanism is considered, consisting in a decrease of cohesion with an increase in contaminant concentration. The influence of partial saturation on the constitutive behaviour is modelled following Barcelona basic model (BBM) formulation (Geotech. 1990; 40(3):405-430; Can. Geotech. J. 1992; 29:1013-1032). The equilibrium equations combined with the CHM constitutive relations, and the governing equations for flow of fluids and contaminant transport, are solved numerically using finite element. The emphasis is laid on understanding the role that the individual chemical effects such as chemo-elastic swelling, or chemo-plastic consolidation, or finally, chemical loss of cohesion have in the overall response of the soil mass. The numerical problems analysed concern the chemical effects in response to wetting of a clay specimen with an organic liquid in rigid wall consolidometer, during biaxial loading up to failure, and in response to fresh water influx during tunnel excavation in swelling clay. Copyright (c) 2005 John Wiley [less ▲]

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See detailModelling Climate and Vegetation Interactions at the Middle Miocene with the Planet Simulator and CARAIB
Henrot, A.-J.; Munhoven, Guy ULg; François, Louis ULg et al

Conference (2011, January 18)

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See detailModelling climate change impacts on key tree species used by lion tamarins in the Brazilian Atlantic Forest
Raghunathan, Poornima ULg

Poster (2013, July 21)

We used 3 IPCC climate change scenarios (A1B, A2, B1) in a dynamic vegetation model (CARAIB), to determine the potential future distribution of biomes and 75 species of trees used as food sources or ... [more ▼]

We used 3 IPCC climate change scenarios (A1B, A2, B1) in a dynamic vegetation model (CARAIB), to determine the potential future distribution of biomes and 75 species of trees used as food sources or sleeping sites by endemic primates, the golden lion tamarin (Leontopithecus rosalia) and the golden-headed lion tamarin (L. chrysomelas), in the Brazilian Atlantic Forest (BAF). Habitat conservation is a vital part of strategies to protect endangered species, and this is an approach to understand how key plant species needed for faunal survival might be affected by climate change and what changes to their distribution are likely. CARAIB computes the main physiological reaction of plants, e.g. water absorption or photosynthesis, as a response to temperature, precipitation, or CO2 partial pressure. The model accurately predicted the current distribution of BAF vegetation types and for 66% of the individual tree species with 70% agreement obtained for presence. In the simulation experiments for the future, 72 out of 75 tree species maintained more than 95% of the original distribution and all species showed a range expansion. The results suggested that the trees may benefit from an increase in temperature, if and only if soil water availability is not altered significantly, as was the case with climate simulations that were used. However, the results must be coupled with current and planned land-uses to maximise the usefulness to conservation, as the BAF is subject to many threats. [less ▲]

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See detailModelling climate control on cropland and grassland development using phenologically tuned variables
Horion, Stéphanie; Tychon, Bernard ULg; Cornet, Yves ULg

in Geophysical Research Abstracts (2010), 12

Many studies already investigated the impact of climate change and climate variability on vegetation at global and continental scales. Using time series of remote sensing and climate data, Nemani et al ... [more ▼]

Many studies already investigated the impact of climate change and climate variability on vegetation at global and continental scales. Using time series of remote sensing and climate data, Nemani et al. (2003) analyzed trends in Net Primary Production in relation with changes in climate and showed that, between 1982 and 1999, primary productivity increased by 6% globally in response to climate change. This study also stressed the need to take into account the spatial variability of climatic constraints to plant growth when analyzing the climate change impact on vegetation. Others authors described different phenomenon linked with climate change such as increases of seasonal NDVI amplitude and growing season duration in the Northern high latitude or changes in circumpolar photosynthetic activities. Understanding the interactions between climate and vegetation is also a key issue in our PhD research. Our objective is to identify the meteorological factors which limit the development of croplands and grasslands in relation with their geographical localization. For that purpose, we acquired 10-daily time series of the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index, NDVI, derived from SPOT-VEGETATION and 7 meteorological parameters (Tmean, Tmin, Tmax, Rain, Rad, ETP, Rain-ETP) derived from ERA40 re-analyses and the operational ECMWF (European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecast) atmospheric model. Cross-correlations between NDVI and each one of the meteorological parameters were analysed for a set of 25 regions over Europe and Africa: 15 agricultural regions and 10 regions covered by grassland or savannas. Unlike others studies, we did not consider the vegetation globally but we focussed on two types of vegetation: croplands and grasslands. This is quite important considering the role of phenology on the vegetation cycle and its relation with climate. Moreover the analysis was not realised using yearly estimates but using 10-daily products. In order to avoid stationarity related issue, a specific methodology was developed taking into account the phenological cycle of the vegetation under consideration. Preliminary results showed that the relation between a meteorological limiting factor, e.g. precipitation, and NDVI can not be considered as linear during the year or even during the growing season. Interactions must to be studied at a smaller time scale than the growing season in order to identify properly the limiting factors to plant growth taking into account its phenology. Moreover the main limiting factors are variable from a region to another. In our analysis we also considered the possibility of a delayed response of the vegetation or a cumulated effect of meteorological events (up to 3 months). Our methodology will be presented during the conference and results will be discussed and illustrated by some test cases. [less ▲]

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See detailModelling coastal/shelf systems with emphasis on long term trends
Nihoul, Jacques ULg; Djenidi, Salim ULg; Hecq, Jean-Henri ULg

in International Journal for Numerical Methods in Engineering (1989), 27(1), 113-127

Hydrodynamic studies of continental seas have been primarily concerned with tides and storm surges and the associated currents which can have velocities as high as several metres per second. However, the ... [more ▼]

Hydrodynamic studies of continental seas have been primarily concerned with tides and storm surges and the associated currents which can have velocities as high as several metres per second. However, the period of the dominant tide is only about half a day and the characteristic life time of a synoptic weather pattern is of the order of a few days. The very strong currents which are produced by the tides and the atmospheric forcing are thus relatively transitory and, over time scales of biological interest, they change and reverse so many times that they more or less cancel out, leaving only a small residual contribution to the net water circulation. Mathematical modelling appears at present as the most reliable approach to the determination of the residual circulation and of the long term transport of nutrients and pollutants in the sea. The residual circulation model developed at the GeoHydrodynamics and Environment Research Laboratory of Liège University (GHER) is described and illustrated by its application to the West-European Continental Shelf. Residual flow patterns on the shelf, and in particular in the Irish Sea and the North Sea, are presented and shown to be in excellent agreement with the observations. The results are exploited to estimate the typical routes and times of residence of nutrients and pollutants and the subsequent long term changes in shelf ecosystems and in the Belgian coastal zone. [less ▲]

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See detailModelling compression tests on aluminium produced by equal channel angular extrusion
Poortmans, Stijn; Duchene, Laurent ULg; Habraken, Anne ULg et al

in Acta Materialia (2009)

The main objective of this paper was to characterize the mechanical properties of commercial purity aluminium AA1050 after being submitted to the equal channel angular extrusion (ECAE) process ... [more ▼]

The main objective of this paper was to characterize the mechanical properties of commercial purity aluminium AA1050 after being submitted to the equal channel angular extrusion (ECAE) process. Compression tests on cylindrical samples extracted from ECAE material are extensively described. The influence of ECAE conditions (number of passes, route, etc.) on the mechanical response is assessed. The extraction of the material behaviour from the experimental results is not straightforward because of inhomogeneities occurring during the test. Therefore, an inverse modelling with the finite element method was used to obtain accurate material parameters by optimization. It appeared that an accurate material yield locus (based on texture analysis) is necessary in order to reproduce the anisotropic behaviour of the ECAE material. On the other hand, its hardening behaviour during compression tests was satisfactorily represented by an elastic (near) perfectly plastic model. [less ▲]

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See detailModelling contaminant transport in heterogeneous aquifers: a tool for the management of groundwater
Dassargues, Alain ULg

Scientific conference (1994, February 02)

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See detailModelling continental weathering: from the lab to the field
Godderis, Y.; Schott, J.; François, Louis ULg et al

in Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta (2007), 71(15), 333-333

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See detailModelling dehydration and quality degradation of maize during fluidized-bed drying
Janas, Sébastien ULg; Boutry, Sébastien; Malumba Kamba, Paul ULg et al

in Journal of Food Engineering (2010), 100(3), 527-534

At harvest time, maize (Zea mays L.) has a moisture content too high to be stored, and has to be dried. To control the previous termdryingnext term impact on maize characteristics, it is necessary to ... [more ▼]

At harvest time, maize (Zea mays L.) has a moisture content too high to be stored, and has to be dried. To control the previous termdryingnext term impact on maize characteristics, it is necessary to accurately know the spatial distribution of temperature and moisture content in the kernel, and the kinetics of quality loss in relation to these two factors. To this end, a physical model of heat and mass transfer in a maize kernel was designed. The Fick and Fourier equations were solved by the finite element method (FEM). The real 3D geometry of maize was obtained by NMR imaging and then used to build the mesh needed for the FEM computations. The model correctly describes the evolutions of maize moisture and salt-soluble protein content during fluidized-bed previous termdryingnext term with a constant previous termdryingnext term air temperature between 50 °C and 100 °C. [less ▲]

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See detailModelling Dual-Use Trade Control Systems
Michel, Quentin ULg; Paile, Sylvain ULg; Jankowitsch-Prevor, Odette

Book published by P.I.E. Peter Lang (2014)

Detailed reference viewed: 37 (1 ULg)
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See detailModelling earthing systems and cables with moment methods
Jacqmaer, P.; Driesen, J.; Geuzaine, Christophe ULg

in International Journal for Computation and Mathematics in Electrical and Electronic Engineering (2009), 28(4), 989--1004

Detailed reference viewed: 17 (1 ULg)
See detailModelling error of a hydrodynamic model of the Mediterranean Sea
Vandenbulcke, Luc ULg; Rixen, M.; Beckers, Jean-Marie ULg et al

Conference (2009)

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See detailModelling European tree species distribution change over the Holocene
Dury, Marie ULg; François, Louis ULg; Warnant, Pierre et al

Conference (2011, September)

The postglacial re-colonization of Europe by temperate tree species from a few glacial refugia during the Holocene (10,000 BP) is a very interesting case to study the mechanisms of the vegetation dynamics ... [more ▼]

The postglacial re-colonization of Europe by temperate tree species from a few glacial refugia during the Holocene (10,000 BP) is a very interesting case to study the mechanisms of the vegetation dynamics. The relative roles that played the climate conditions, the species dispersal capacities and the inter-specific competition in the re-colonization rates remain controversial. We investigate these different aspects with the CARAIB dynamic vegetation model (CARAIB DVM). Transient runs were performed over the Holocene using the HadCM3 AOGCM-reconstructed climate. European-wide species migration at 0.5° x 0.5° is represented in the model using migration rates derived from a high resolution cellular automaton, CATS-UPSCALE. Individual tree species migration rates were pre-calculated with CATS-UPSCALE every 1000 years over each grid cell used by the DVM in the climatic conditions reconstructed by the AOGCM. The impacts of competition between species on plant dispersal are not taken into account by the automaton. Thus, in CARAIB, a function has been constructed to reduce the potential CATS migration rates in competition conditions. It is based on the species dispersal kernel and on the species net primary productivity. The migration of one species, from its 10,000 BP refugia, is studied within a landscape defined by a set of other species for which no dispersal limitations are assumed. Here, we illustrate the results obtained for two wind-dispersed (Abies alba and Picea abies) and for a no wind-dispersed (Fagus sylvatica) tree species. We compare the HadCM3 climate outputs with reconstructions of some climate variables from fossil dataset. The speeds and the paths of the postglacial spread obtained with the DVM are compared to the past distributions of the three species reconstructed from pollen and macrofossil data. The Holocene climate conditions simulated by the HadCM3 AOGCM do not constrain the European re-colonization of the studied species, except in Scandinavia at the beginning of the period for Picea abies. We observe that, during the past 10,000 years, species occupied regions where climate conditions were different from present observed species climate requirements, notably in the 10k species refugia. This result may imply that at present the species do not occupy their potential distribution area and thus that the postglacial re-colonization is not completed yet. We also show that species dispersal capacities cannot explain the observed species migration over the Holocene and that competition has played an important role. Indeed, when we use the potential migration rates (no competition), species migration rates are too fast. [less ▲]

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See detailModelling European tree species distribution change over the Holocene
Dury, Marie ULg; Dullinger, Stefan; Hülber, Karl et al

Conference (2012, March 01)

The postglacial re-colonization of Europe by temperate tree species from a few glacial refugia during the Holocene (10,000 BP) is a very interesting case to study the mechanisms of the vegetation dynamics ... [more ▼]

The postglacial re-colonization of Europe by temperate tree species from a few glacial refugia during the Holocene (10,000 BP) is a very interesting case to study the mechanisms of the vegetation dynamics. The relative roles that played the climate conditions, the species dispersal capacities and the competition between species in the re-colonization rates remain controversial. We investigate these different aspects with the CARAIB dynamic vegetation model (CARAIB DVM). Transient runs were performed over the Holocene using the HadCM3 AOGCM-reconstructed climate. European-wide species migration at 0.5° x 0.5° is represented in the model using migration rates derived from a high resolution cellular automaton, CATS-UPSCALE. Individual tree species migration rates were pre-calculated with CATS-UPSCALE every 1000 years over each grid cell used by the DVM in the climatic conditions reconstructed by the AOGCM. The impacts of competition on plant dispersal are not taken into account by the automaton. Thus, in CARAIB, a function has been constructed to reduce the potential CATS migration rates in competition conditions. It is based on the species dispersal kernel and on the net primary productivity of the different species present on the grid cell. The migration of one species, from its 10,000 BP refugia, is studied within a landscape defined by a set of other species for which no dispersal limitations are assumed. Here, we illustrate the results obtained for two wind-dispersed (Abies alba and Picea abies) and for a no wind-dispersed (Fagus sylvatica) tree species. The speeds and the paths of the postglacial spread obtained with the DVM are compared to the past distributions of the three species reconstructed from pollen and macrofossil data. The Holocene climate conditions simulated by the HadCM3 AOGCM do not constrain the European re-colonization of the studied species, except in Scandinavia at the beginning of the period for Picea abies. We observe that, during the past 10,000 years, species occupied regions where climate conditions were different from present observed species climate requirements, notably in the 10k species refugia. This result may imply that at present the species do not occupy their potential distribution area and thus that the postglacial re-colonization is not completed yet. We also show that species dispersal capacities cannot explain the observed species migration over the Holocene and that competition has played an important role. Indeed, when we use the potential migration rates (no competition), species spread too fast. [less ▲]

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See detailModelling eutrophication in mesotidal and macrotidal estuaries. The role of intertidal seaweeds.
Alvera Azcarate, Aïda ULg; Ferreira, Joao; Nunes, Joao

in Estuarine Coastal & Shelf Science (2003), 57

The role of intertidal seaweeds in the primary production of mesotidal and macrotidal estuaries has been examined by means of a model, applied to the Tagus Estuary (Portugal). Special attention was paid ... [more ▼]

The role of intertidal seaweeds in the primary production of mesotidal and macrotidal estuaries has been examined by means of a model, applied to the Tagus Estuary (Portugal). Special attention was paid to the description of the underwater light climate in intertidal areas, and to the importance of the formation of tidal pools. Two approaches were compared for the simulation of suspended particulate matter (SPM) in the pool areas, using three algal species. The use of an erosion–deposition approach to simulate the distribution of SPM in tidal pools gives an increase in net primary productivity per unit area of between 130 and 1300%, when compared to the more conventional approach where the suspended matter in the overlying water in intertidal areas is considered identical to that in the channels. The upscaled erosion–deposition model was applied to tidal pool areas and combined with the more conventional model for other intertidal areas. Results show that annual carbon fixation by intertidal seaweeds in the estuary exceeds 13,500 t C yr−1, and accounts for 21% of the total carbon fixed by all primary producers. The corresponding nitrogen removal by seaweeds corresponds to the annual nutrient loading of a population of 490,000 inhabitants. [less ▲]

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See detailModelling Farmers Credit Allocation Decisions and Impacts on Farms Technical Efficiency in Benin, West Africa
Sossou, Comlan ULg; Noma, Freddy; Yabi, Jacob

Poster (2014)

This paper models farmers credit allocation behaviours in schemes and analyses effects of the schemes on farms technical efficiency. Data were collected from 476 farmers using the multistage sampling ... [more ▼]

This paper models farmers credit allocation behaviours in schemes and analyses effects of the schemes on farms technical efficiency. Data were collected from 476 farmers using the multistage sampling procedure. The stochastic frontier truncated-normal with conditional mean model was used to assess allocation schemes effects on farms technical efficiency. A Tobit model reveals the impact of farmers' socio-demographic characteristics on efficiency scores. Results revealed that the revenue 2,262,566 Fcfa is positively correlated with acreage, quantity of labour and costs of fertilisers, insecticides, fertilisers. The average technical efficiency score is 0.675 (±0.137). The scores are diversely distributed across farms, with a median score equals to 0.713. Farmers behaviours respond to six credit investments schemes, which are categorised in two allocation contexts: in-farm and out-farm allocations. In the latter credit is invested towards social needs (weddings, traditional festivals, etc.) and household needs (health, education, housing etc.). Credit in-farm allocations are towards production inputs (land, labour, capital). The model showed that only one scheme impacted positively farms technical efficiency: scheme (e). It is the decision to invest the credit to purchase better quality of pesticides, herbicides, fertilisers, etc. The positive effect of the scheme (c) may be significant under conditions of farmers' education level improvement. Then, scheme (e) is a better investment for all farmers; either they have a high or low level of education. But the credit allocation to buy agricultural materials is positive only for the educated farmers; who are 53.53% of the surveyed farmers. The scores of efficiency are reduced by household size and gender of the household head. Therefore, households with less than 10 members, an educated man as head; are likely to improve their farms technical efficiency through two credit investments schemes: Credit×Capital and Credit×Intermediary-inputs. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 29 (4 ULg)