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See detailNeuroendocrine aspects of the thymus
Geenen, Vincent ULg

in Maggi, Mario; Jonhston, Colin A. (Eds.) Horizons in Endocrinology (1988)

Detailed reference viewed: 6 (0 ULg)
See detailNeuroendocrine control of the immune response
Legros, Jean-Jacques ULg; Geenen, Vincent ULg

in Whalley, L. J.; Page, M. L. (Eds.) Stress, immunity and disease (1989)

Detailed reference viewed: 2 (0 ULg)
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See detailNeuroendocrine Control of the Onset of Puberty: Secretion of Gonadotrophin-Releasing Hormone from Rat Hypothalamic Explants
Bourguignon, Jean-Pierre ULg; Gerard, Arlette ULg; Fawe, L. et al

in Acta Paediatrica Scandinavica. Supplement (1991), 372

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See detailNeuroendocrine disruption of pubertal timing and interactions between homeostasis
Bourguignon, Jean-Pierre ULg; rasier, Gregory; Lebrethon, Marie-Christine ULg et al

in Molecular & Cellular Endocrinology (2010), 324(1-2), 110-120

The involvement of environmental factors such as endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in the timing of onset of puberty is suggested by recent changes in age at onset of puberty and pattern of ... [more ▼]

The involvement of environmental factors such as endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in the timing of onset of puberty is suggested by recent changes in age at onset of puberty and pattern of distribution that are variable among countries, as well as new forms of sexual precocity after migration. However, the evidence of association between early or late pubertal timing and exposure to EDCs is weak in humans, possibly due to heterogeneity of effects likely involving mixtures and incapacity to assess fetal or neonatal exposure retrospectively. The neuroendocrine system which is crucial for physiological onset of puberty is targeted by EDCs. These compounds also act directly in the gonads and peripheral sex-steroid sensitive tissues. Feedbacks add to the complexity of regulation so that changes in pubertal timing caused by EDCs can involve both central and peripheral mechanisms. In experimental conditions, several neuroendocrine endpoints are affected by EDCs though only few studies including from our laboratory aimed at EDC involvement in the pathophysiology of early sexual maturation. Recent observations support the concept that EDC cause disturbed energy balance and account for the obesity epidemic. Several aspects are linking this system and the reproductive axis: coexisting neuroendocrine and peripheral effects, dependency on fetal/neonatal programming and the many factors cross-linking the two systems, for instance leptin, adiponectin, Agouti Related Peptide (AgRP). This opens perspectives for future research and, hopefully, measures preventing the disturbances of homeostasis caused by EDCs. [less ▲]

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See detailNeuroendocrine disruption: the emerging concept.
Trudeau, Vance L; Kah, Olivier; Bourguignon, Jean-Pierre ULg

in Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health. Part B, Critical Reviews (2011), 14(5-7), 267-9

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Peer Reviewed
See detailNeuroendocrine evaluation of catecholaminergic neurotransmission in mania
Ansseau, Marc ULg; Von Frenckell, Rémi; Cerfontaine, Jean-Luc et al

in Psychiatry Research (1987), 22

Detailed reference viewed: 5 (1 ULg)
See detailNeuroendocrine hormones and the immune system
Kelly, Paul; Blalock, J. Edwin; Chrousos, George P. et al

in Cuello, A. Claudio; Collier, Brian (Eds.) Pharmacological Sciences: Perspectives for Research and Therapy in the Late 1990s (1995)

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See detailNeuroendocrine Mechanism of Onset of Puberty. Sequential Reduction in Activity of Inhibitory and Facilitatory N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptors
Bourguignon, Jean-Pierre ULg; Gerard, Arlette ULg; Alvarez Gonzalez, Maria-Luz ULg et al

in Journal of Clinical Investigation (1992), 90(5), 1736-44

In humans and in several animal species, puberty results from changes in pulsatile gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion in the hypothalamus. In particular, the frequency of pulsatile GnRH ... [more ▼]

In humans and in several animal species, puberty results from changes in pulsatile gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion in the hypothalamus. In particular, the frequency of pulsatile GnRH secretion increases at the onset of puberty, as can be shown by using hypothalamic explants of male rats of 15 and 25 d. Previous observations from us and others suggested that the initiation of puberty could involve a facilitatory effect of excitatory amino acids mediated through N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. We found that GnRH secretion could be activated through NMDA receptors only around the time of onset of puberty (25 d). The aim of this study was to clarify why this activation did not occur earlier (at 15 d) and could no longer be observed by the end of puberty (at 50 d). We studied GnRH secretion in the presence of MK-801, a noncompetitive antagonist of NMDA receptors or AP-5, a competitive antagonist. We showed that, in the hypothalamus of immature male rats (15 d), a highly potent inhibitory control of pulsatile GnRH secretion in vitro was mediated through NMDA receptors. These data were confirmed in vivo because administration of the antagonist MK-801 (0.001 mg/kg) to immature male rats resulted in early pubertal development. Onset of puberty (25 d) was characterized by the disappearance of that NMDA receptor-mediated inhibition, thus unmasking a facilitatory effect also mediated through NMDA receptors. During puberty, there was a reduction in activity of this facilitatory control which was no longer opposed by its inhibitory counterpart. We conclude that a sequential reduction in activity of inhibitory and facilitatory NMDA receptors provides a developmental basis for the neuroendocrine mechanism of onset of puberty. [less ▲]

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See detailNeuroendocrine mechanisms controlling female puberty: new approaches, new concepts.
Ojeda, S.; Roth, C.; Mungenast, A. et al

in International Journal of Andrology (2006), 29

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See detailNeuroendocrine microenvironments in the immune system
Geenen, Vincent ULg

Conference given outside the academic context (1988)

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See detailNeuroendocrine regulation of GnRH release in induced ovulators.
Bakker, Julie ULg; Baum, M. J.

in Frontiers in Neuroendocrinology (2000), 21(3), 220-62

GnRH is the key neuropeptide controlling reproductive function in all vertebrate species. Two different neuroendocrine mechanisms have evolved among female mammals to regulate the mediobasal hypothalamic ... [more ▼]

GnRH is the key neuropeptide controlling reproductive function in all vertebrate species. Two different neuroendocrine mechanisms have evolved among female mammals to regulate the mediobasal hypothalamic (MBH) release of GnRH leading to the preovulatory secretion of LH by the anterior pituitary gland. In females of spontaneously ovulating species, including rats, mice, guinea pigs, sheep, monkeys, and women, ovarian steroids secreted by maturing ovarian follicles induce a pulsatile pattern of GnRH release in the median eminence that, in turn, stimulates a preovulatory LH surge. In females of induced ovulating species, including rabbits, ferrets, cats, and camels, the preovulatory release of GnRH, and the resultant preovulatory LH surge, is induced by the receipt of genital somatosensory stimuli during mating. Induced ovulators generally do not show "spontaneous" steroid-induced LH surges during their reproductive cycles, suggesting that the positive feedback actions of steroid hormones on GnRH release are reduced or absent in these species. By contrast, mating-induced preovulatory surges occasionally occur in some spontaneously ovulating species. Most research in the field of GnRH neurobiology has been performed using spontaneous ovulators including rat, guinea pig, sheep, and rhesus monkey. This review summarizes the literature concerning the neuroendocrine mechanisms controlling GnRH biosynthesis and release in females of several induced ovulating species, and whenever possible it contrasts the results with those obtained for spontaneously ovulating species. It also considers the adaptive, evolutionary benefits and disadvantages of each type of ovulatory control mechanism. In females of induced ovulating species estradiol acts in the brain to induce aspects of proceptive and receptive sexual behavior. The primary mechanism involved in the preovulatory release of GnRH among induced ovulators involves the activation of midbrain and brainstem noradrenergic neurons in response to genital-somatosensory signals generated by receipt of an intromission from a male during mating. These noradrenergic neurons project to the MBH and, when activated, promote the release of GnRH from nerve terminals in the median eminence. In contrast to spontaneous ovulators, there is little evidence that endogenous opioid peptides normally inhibit MBH GnRH release among induced ovulators. Instead, the neural signals that induce a preovulatory LH surge in these species seem to be primarily excitatory. A complete understanding of the neuroendocrine control of ovulation will only be achieved in the future by comparative studies of several animal model systems in which mating-induced as well as spontaneous, hormonally stimulated activation of GnRH neurons drives the preovulatory LH surge. [less ▲]

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See detailThe neuroendocrine thymic microenvironment
Geenen, Vincent ULg; Legros, Jean-Jacques ULg; Adam, Francine et al

in Journal of Endocrinology (1986), 111 (Suppl.)

Detailed reference viewed: 6 (3 ULg)
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See detailThe neuroendocrine thymus. Abundant occurrence of oxytocin-, vasopressin-, and neurophysin-like peptides in the thymus
Moll, Ute M.; Lane, Bernard L.; Robert, Françoise et al

in Histochemistry (1988), 89

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See detailThe neuroendocrine thymus: Coexistence of oxytocin and neurophysin in the human thymus
Geenen, Vincent ULg; Legros, Jean-Jacques ULg; Franchimont, Paul et al

in Science (1986), 232

Detailed reference viewed: 37 (14 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailNeuroendocrine tumor of the nasal cavity (esthesioneuroblastome) : about one case with paraneoplastic Cushing's syndrome.
Reznik, Michel ULg; Melon, J.; Lambrichts, M. et al

in Oncology Overview (1989)

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See detailNeuroendocrine-Immune Interactions in T Cell Ontogeny
Geenen, Vincent ULg; Robert, Françoise; Fatemi, Marjaneh et al

in Thymus (1989), 13(3-4), 131-140

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See detailNeuroendocrine-Immunology: from systemic interactions to the immune tolerance of self neuroendocrine functions
Geenen, Vincent ULg; Robert, Françoise; Legros, Jean-Jacques ULg et al

in Acta Clinica Belgica (1991), 46

In recent years, it appeared more and more that the three major integrating and adaptive systems of intercellular communication, nervous, endocrine, and immune systems, are closely interconnected. Through ... [more ▼]

In recent years, it appeared more and more that the three major integrating and adaptive systems of intercellular communication, nervous, endocrine, and immune systems, are closely interconnected. Through these interactions, psychological and neurological influences can modulate the immune response (neuroimmunomodulation), while immune cells may communicate to the neuroendocrine system by a regulatory feedback loop. On the basis of our own observations, it has been shown that the neuroendocrine-immune dialogue occurs in the thymus during the early steps of T-cell differentiation, and could be involved both in T-cell positive as well as negative selections. [less ▲]

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See detailneuroendocrinology in the perinatal period
Battisti, Oreste ULg

in mini acta of belgian society of pediatrics (1995), 27

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See detailThe neuroendocrinology of reproductive behavior in Japanese quail
Balthazart, Jacques ULg; Baillien, Michelle; Charlier, Thierry ULg et al

in Domestic Animal Endocrinology (2003), 25

Sex steroid hormones such as testosterone have widespread effects on brain physiology and function but one of their best characterized effects arguably involves the activation of male sexual behavior ... [more ▼]

Sex steroid hormones such as testosterone have widespread effects on brain physiology and function but one of their best characterized effects arguably involves the activation of male sexual behavior. During the past 20 years we have investigated the testosterone control of male sexual behavior in an avian species, the Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica).We briefly reviewhere the main features and advantages of this species relating to the investigation of fundamental questions in the field of behavioral neuroendocrinology, a field that studies inter-relationship among hormones, brain and behavior. Special attention is given to the intracellular metabolism of testosterone, in particular its aromatization into an estrogen, which plays a critical limiting role in the mediation of the behavioral effects of testosterone. Brain aromatase activity is controlled by steroids which increase the transcription of the enzyme, but afferent inputs that affect the intraneuronal concentrations of calcium also appear to have a pronounced effect on the enzyme activity through rapid changes in its phosphorylation status. The physiological significance of these slowgenomic and rapid, presumably non-genomic, changes in brain aromatase activity are also briefly discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailNeuroendocrinology of song behavior and avian brain plasticity: Multiple sites of action of sex steroid hormones
Ball, G. F.; Riters, L. V.; Balthazart, Jacques ULg

in Frontiers in Neuroendocrinology (2002), 23(2), 137-178

Seasonal changes in the brain of songbirds are one of the most dramatic examples of naturally occuring neuroplasticity that have been described in any vertebrate species. In males of temperate-zone ... [more ▼]

Seasonal changes in the brain of songbirds are one of the most dramatic examples of naturally occuring neuroplasticity that have been described in any vertebrate species. In males of temperate-zone songbird species, the volumes of several telencephalic nuclei that control song behavior are significantly larger in the spring than in the fall. These increases in volume are correlated with high rates of singing and high concentrations of testosterone in the plasma. Several song nuclei express either androgen receptors or estrogen receptors, therefore it is possible that testosterone acting via estrogenic or androgenic metabolites regulates song behavior by seasonally modulating the morphology of these song control nuclei. However, the causal links among these variables have not been established. Dissociations among high concentrations of testosterone, enlarged song nuclei, and high rates of singing behavior have been observed. Singing behavior itself can promote cellular changes associated with increases in the volume of the song control nuclei. Also, testosterone may stimulate song behavior by acting in brain regions outside of the song control system such as in the preoptic area or in catecholamine cell groups in the brainstem. Thus testosterone effects on neuroplasticity in the song system may be indirect in that behavioral activity stimulated by testosterone acting in sites that promote male sexual behavior could in turn promote morphological changes in the song system. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science (USA). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 17 (0 ULg)