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See detailInfections after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation with a nonmyeloablative conditioning regimen.
Frere, Pascale ULg; Baron, Frédéric ULg; Bonnet, Christophe ULg et al

in Bone Marrow Transplantation (2006), 37(4), 411-8

Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) following nonmyeloablative conditioning (NMSCT) may be associated with a reduced risk of infection compared to standard allogeneic HCT. We retrospectively analyzed ... [more ▼]

Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) following nonmyeloablative conditioning (NMSCT) may be associated with a reduced risk of infection compared to standard allogeneic HCT. We retrospectively analyzed incidence and risk factors of infection in 62 patients undergoing NMSCT with low-dose TBI +/- fludarabine and postgrafting CsA and MMF. The proportion of patients with any infection was 77%, but the majority of infectious events occurred beyond day 30. Donor other than sibling, older age, early disease and male gender were significant risk factors. The incidence of bacteremia was 55% at 1 year and the number of bacteremic episodes was 0.9 per patient (0.08 before day 30). The risk of bacteremia increased with older age and the use of a donor other than an HLA-identical sibling, but not with neutropenia. The incidence of infections other than bacteremia correlated with the use of corticosteroids. The risk of CMV infection increased with high-risk CMV serology, and risk of CMV disease with high-risk CMV serology, older age, first transplantation and a diagnosis of lymphoma. In conclusion, after NMSCT, infections are not frequent in the first 30 days post transplant but careful long-term monitoring is necessary thereafter. [less ▲]

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See detailInfections after CD34-selected or unmanipulated autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.
Frere, Pascale ULg; Pereira-Martins, Maguy ULg; Fillet, Georges ULg et al

in European Journal of Haematology (2006), 76(2), 102-8

Immune reconstitution may be delayed after CD34-selected compared with unmanipulated autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT), resulting in a theoretically increased risk of ... [more ▼]

Immune reconstitution may be delayed after CD34-selected compared with unmanipulated autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT), resulting in a theoretically increased risk of infections. In a case-control matched study we compared the incidence of infection in 25 recipients of CD34-selected PBSC (CD34 group) and 75 recipients of unmanipulated PBSC (PBSC group) transplants. The population included 52 males and 48 females suffering from non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (n = 32), Hodgkin's disease (n = 8), multiple myeloma (n = 40) or breast cancer (n = 20). Neutrophil engraftment was comparable in the two groups. The actuarial incidence of infection was similar in the two groups (56% vs. 49% at day 30, and 70% vs. 64% at 1 yr respectively). The proportion of patients with 1, 2 or 3 infections, the number of infectious event per patient (1.32 vs. 1.04; NS), the number of infections before day 15 or 30, between days 31 and 100 or after day 100, the risk of varicella-zoster virus or cytomegalovirus infection or disease, or the use of antibiotic or antifungal therapy, were not increased in the CD34 compared with the PBSC group. The main agents responsible for infection were bacteria, particularly gram-positive cocci, in both groups. Bacteremia accounted for 33% of all infectious events in the CD34 group vs. 16% in the PBSC group (P < 0.05). Fungal infections were rare. In conclusion, our results do not support the notion that CD34-selection of the graft is associated with an increased rate of infection after autologous PBSC transplantation. The role of extended infection prophylaxis should be evaluated. [less ▲]

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See detailLes infections broncho-pulmonaires extra-hospitalières de l'adulte: quel antibiotique choisir?
Bury, Thierry ULg; Radermecker, Maurice ULg

in Revue Médicale de Liège (1994), 49(9), 497-502

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See detailInfections cutanees contractees a l'occasion d'activites sportives ou de loisirs recreatifs
Ledoux, Didier ULg; Goffin, Véronique ULg; Fumal, I. et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2001), 56(5), 339-42

Going in for sports is at increased risk for cutaneous infections that can be viral, bacterial, mycotic and parasitic in nature. The specific conditions of sports practice have a major influence on their ... [more ▼]

Going in for sports is at increased risk for cutaneous infections that can be viral, bacterial, mycotic and parasitic in nature. The specific conditions of sports practice have a major influence on their occurrence. Other factors such as age, gender and genetic predisposition can also play a role. The cutaneous infections should be the target of preventive measures. To assume the worse, they should be recognized and treated without delay in order to avoid the more or less prolonged arrest of the sports activity and the disease transmission to partners. [less ▲]

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See detailLes infections cutanées dues à l'herpès
Nikkels, Arjen ULg

in Actualités Médicales Belges (1995), 8(450),

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See detailInfections cutanées virales récurrentes et le syndrome de Wiskott-Aldrich.
Vandenbossche, Géraldine; Nikkels, Arjen ULg; Pierard-Franchimont, Claudine ULg et al

in Dermatologie Actualité (2008), 109

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See detailInfections de la shère génitale
MELIN, Pierrette ULg; DESCY, Julie ULg; MEEX, Cécile ULg

in MELIN, Pierrette; POLET, Marianne (Eds.) Les infections de la sphère génitale. Bruxelles, Belgique (2016, September 29)

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See detailLes infections des ongulés sauvages par les herpesvirus
Thiry, Etienne ULg; Reid, H. W.; Pastoret, Paul-Pierre ULg et al

in Rosset, R. (Ed.) Faune sauvage d'Europe. Surveillance sanitaire et pathologie de mammifères et des oiseaux (1987)

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See detailInfections des voies génitales: Introduction et Infections Sexuellement Transmissibles
Melin, Pierrette ULg

in Melin, Pierrette (Ed.) Les infections de la sphères génitales (2015, October)

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See detailLes infections digestives et leur prévention (hors C.difficile)
HUYNEN, Pascale ULg

Scientific conference (2013, May 22)

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See detailLes infections du rachis
Martin, Didier ULg

Scientific conference (2009, June 03)

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See detailInfections et grossesse
MELIN, Pierrette ULg

Conference (2002, March 16)

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See detailInfections et grossesse
MELIN, Pierrette ULg

Conference (2003, April 04)

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See detailINFECTIONS ET PROPHYLAXIES ANTIINFECTIEUSES DANS LA DRÉPANOCYTOSE
Lepage, P; DRESSE, Marie-Françoise ULg; FORGET, Patricia ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2004), 59(3), 145-148

Bacterial infections remain a major cause of morbidity and mortality among young children with sickle cell susceptibility to infections is mainly observed in homozygous sickle cell disease. The incidence ... [more ▼]

Bacterial infections remain a major cause of morbidity and mortality among young children with sickle cell susceptibility to infections is mainly observed in homozygous sickle cell disease. The incidence of bacteremias in children under 3 years of age is ~8 events/100 patient-years among homozygous subjects and ~5 events/100 patient-years among those with SC hemoglobinopathy. Pneumococci and Salmonellae are the most frequently isolated bacteria. Severe clinical manifestations include septicemia, meningitis, osteomyelitis and pneumonia. M. Pneumoniae and C. Pneumoniae infections may be severe and may induce acute chest syndrome. The high incidence and severity of bacterial infections in these children justify prevention efforts by antibiotic prophylaxis and vaccination. The efficacy of oral penicillin prophylaxis against pneumococcal infections has been well demonstrated and is now recommended from 3 months of age. The antipneumococcal conjugate vaccine has been shown to be safe and immunogenic in young infants. [less ▲]

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See detailLes infections focales et leurs liens avec la parodontologie
Geerts, Sabine ULg

Conference (1996)

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See detailInfections from bites and scratches from dogs, cats and rats
Mainil, Jacques ULg

Scientific conference (2009, January)

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See detailInfections intestinales et systemiques à Campylobacter
Joiris, E.; Ulama-Dubois, Nicole; Melin, Pierrette ULg

in Revue Médicale de Liège (1983), 38(6), 204-8

Detailed reference viewed: 19 (1 ULg)