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See detailThe neural basis of temporal order processing in past and future thought
D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg; Jeunehomme, Olivier ULg; Majerus, Steve ULg et al

in Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience (in press)

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See detailThe neural correlate of (un)awareness: lessons from the vegetative state
Laureys, Steven ULg

in Trends in Cognitive Sciences (2005), 9(12), 556-559

Consciousness has two main components: wakefulness and awareness. The vegetative state is characterized by wakefulness without awareness. Recent functional neuroimaging results have shown that some parts ... [more ▼]

Consciousness has two main components: wakefulness and awareness. The vegetative state is characterized by wakefulness without awareness. Recent functional neuroimaging results have shown that some parts of the cortex are still functioning in 'vegetative' patients. External stimulation, such as a painful stimulus, still activates 'primary' sensory cortices in these patients but these areas are functionally disconnected from 'higher order' associative areas needed for awareness. Such studies are disentangling the neural correlates of the vegetative state from the minimally conscious state, and have major clinical consequences in addition to empirical importance for the understanding of consciousness. [less ▲]

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See detailThe neural correlate of consciousness: lessons from coma related states
Vanhaudenhuyse, Audrey ULg

Scientific conference (2010)

Detailed reference viewed: 6 (0 ULg)
See detailThe neural correlate of consciousness: lessons from coma related states
Vanhaudenhuyse, Audrey ULg

Scientific conference (2009)

Detailed reference viewed: 11 (0 ULg)
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See detailNeural correlates mediating the consolidation of visuomotor adapted actions : A study on the role of night sleep versus the passage of daytime
Debas, Karen; Carrier, Julie; Orban, Pierre et al

in NeuroImage (2009), 45(Suppl. 1),

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See detailNeural correlates of "hot" and "cold" emotional processing : a multilevel approach to the functional anatomy of emotion
Schaefer, Alexandre; Collette, Fabienne ULg; Philippot, Pierre et al

in Neuroimage (2003), 18(4), 938-949

The neural correlates of two hypothesized emotional processing modes, i.e., schematic and propositional modes, were investigated with positron emission tomography. Nineteen subjects performed an emotional ... [more ▼]

The neural correlates of two hypothesized emotional processing modes, i.e., schematic and propositional modes, were investigated with positron emission tomography. Nineteen subjects performed an emotional mental imagery task while mentally repeating sentences linked to the meaning of the imagery script. In the schematic conditions, participants repeated metaphoric sentences, whereas in the propositional conditions, the sentences were explicit questions about specific emotional appraisals of the imagery scenario. Five types of emotional scripts were proposed to the subjects (happiness, anger, affection, sadness, and a neutral scenario). The results supported the hypothesized distinction between schematic and propositional emotional processing modes. Specifically, schematic mode was associated with increased activity in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex whereas propositional mode was associated with activation of the anterolateral prefrontal cortex. In addition, interaction analyses showed that schematic versus propositional processing of happiness (compared with the neutral scenario) was associated with increased activity in the ventral striatum whereas "schematic anger" was tentatively associated with activation of the ventral pallidum. (C) 2003 Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailNeural Correlates of a Non-Image-Forming Response to Light Exposure During the Daytime: a fMRI Study
Vandewalle, Gilles ULg; Balteau, Evelyne ULg; Moreau, V et al

in NeuroImage (2005), 26(Suppl. 1),

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See detailNeural correlates of anosognosia for cognitive impairment in Alzheimer's disease
Salmon, Eric ULg; Perani, D.; Herholz, K. et al

in Human Brain Mapping (2006), 27(7), 588-597

We explored the neural substrate of anosognosia for cognitive impairment in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Two hundred nine patients with mild to moderate dementia and their caregivers assessed patients ... [more ▼]

We explored the neural substrate of anosognosia for cognitive impairment in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Two hundred nine patients with mild to moderate dementia and their caregivers assessed patients' cognitive impairment by answering a structured questionnaire. Subjects rated 13 cognitive domains as not impaired or associated with mild, moderate, severe, or very severe difficulties, and a sum score was calculated. Two measures of anosognosia were derived. A patient's self assessment, unconfounded by objective measurements of cognitive deficits such as dementia severity and episodic memory impairment, provided an estimate of impaired self-evaluative judgment about cognition in AD. Impaired self-evaluation was related to a decrease in brain metabolism measured with 18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in orbital prefrontal cortex and in medial temporal structures. In a cognitive model of anosognosia, medial temporal dysfunction might impair a comparison mechanism between current information on cognition and personal knowledge. Hypoactivity in orbitofrontal cortex may not allow AD patients to update the qualitative judgment associated with their impaired cognitive abilities. Caregivers perceived greater cognitive impairments than patients did. The discrepancy score between caregiver's and patient's evaluations, an other measure of anosognosia, was negatively related to metabolic activity located in the temporoparietal junction, consistent with an impairment of self-referential processes and perspective taking in AD. [less ▲]

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See detailNeural correlates of cognitive control at the item level in the Stroop task.
Grandjean, Julien ULg; D'Ostilio, Kevin ULg; Fias, Wim et al

Poster (2010, November 15)

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See detailNeural correlates of cognitive control at the item specific level in the Stroop task
Grandjean, Julien ULg; D'Ostilio, Kevin ULg; Fias, Wim et al

Poster (2010, May 04)

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See detailThe neural correlates of cognitive reserve in aging
Bastin, Christine ULg; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg et al

Scientific conference (2011)

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See detailNeural correlates of consciousness during general anesthesia using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI).
BONHOMME, Vincent ULg; Boveroux, Pierre; Brichant, Jean-François ULg et al

in Archives italiennes de biologie (2012), 150(2-3), 155-63

This paper reviews the current knowledge about the mechanisms of anesthesia-induced alteration of consciousness. It is now evident that hypnotic anesthetic agents have specific brain targets whose ... [more ▼]

This paper reviews the current knowledge about the mechanisms of anesthesia-induced alteration of consciousness. It is now evident that hypnotic anesthetic agents have specific brain targets whose function is hierarchically altered in a dose-dependent manner. Higher order networks, thought to be involved in mental content generation, as well as sub-cortical networks involved in thalamic activity regulation seems to be affected first by increasing concentrations of hypnotic agents that enhance inhibitory neurotransmission. Lower order sensory networks are preserved, including thalamo-cortical connectivity into those networks, even at concentrations that suppress responsiveness, but cross-modal sensory interactions are inhibited. Thalamo-cortical connectivity into the consciousness networks decreases with increasing concentrations of those agents, and is transformed into an anti-correlated activity between the thalamus and the cortex for the deepest levels of sedation, when the subject is non responsive. Future will tell us whether these brain function alterations are also observed with hypnotic agents that mainly inhibit excitatory neurotransmission. The link between the observations made using fMRI and the identified biochemical targets of hypnotic anesthetic agents still remains to be identified. [less ▲]

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See detailNeural correlates of controlled memory processes in questionable Alzheimer’s disease
Bastin, Christine ULg; Kerrouche, Nacer; LEKEU, Françoise ULg et al

in Ashford, J. Wesson; Rosen, Allyson; Adamson, Maheen (Eds.) et al Advances in Alzheimer's Disease. Volume 2: Handbook of imaging the Alzheimer brain (2011)

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterized by a progressive loss of controlled cognitive processes (processes requiring mental effort and attentional resources), and functional neuroimaging at early stages ... [more ▼]

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterized by a progressive loss of controlled cognitive processes (processes requiring mental effort and attentional resources), and functional neuroimaging at early stages of AD provides an opportunity to tease out the neural correlates of controlled processes. Controlled and automatic memory performance was assessed with the Process Dissociation Procedure in 50 patients diagnosed with questionable Alzheimer’s disease (QAD). The patients’ brain glucose metabolism was measured using FDG-PET. After a follow-up period of 36 months, 27 patients had converted to AD, while 23 remained stable. Both groups showed a similar decrease in controlled memory processes but preserved automatic processes at entry into the study, suggesting that impairment of controlled memory would not be specific for AD. Patients who subsequently converted to Alzheimer type dementia showed significantly decreased brain metabolism at baseline compared to stable QAD in associative cortices known to be involved in AD (the left precuneus, the right inferior parietal lobule and bilateral middle temporal cortex).Voxel-based cognitive and metabolic correlations showed that a decrease in controlled memory processes was preferentially correlated with lower activity in the dorsomedial prefrontal and posterior cingulate cortices in very early AD patients. The dorsomedial prefrontal cortex would play a role in controlled memory processes as they relate to reflective and monitoring processes, while the posterior cingulate cortex is involved in the controlled access to previously encoded episodes. In stable QAD patients, reduced controlled performance in verbal memory correlated with impaired activity in the left anterior hippocampal structure, which would alter the reactivation of associations created at encoding. [less ▲]

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See detailNeural correlates of counting of sequential sensory and motor events in the human brain.
Kansaku, Kenji; Johnson, Ari; Grillon, Marie-Laure et al

in NeuroImage (2006), 31(2), 649-60

Little is known about the ability to enumerate small numbers of successive stimuli and movements. It is possible that there exist neural substrates that are consistently recruited both to count sensory ... [more ▼]

Little is known about the ability to enumerate small numbers of successive stimuli and movements. It is possible that there exist neural substrates that are consistently recruited both to count sensory stimuli from different modalities and for counting movements executed by different effectors. Here, we identify a network of areas that was involved in enumerating small numbers of auditory, visual, and somatosensory stimuli, and in enumerating sequential movements of hands and feet, in the bilateral premotor cortex, presupplementary motor area, posterior temporal cortex, and thalamus. The most significant consistent activation across sensory and motor counting conditions was found in the lateral premotor cortex. Lateral premotor activation was not dependent on movement preparation, stimulus presentation timing, or number word verbalization. Movement counting, but not sensory counting, activated the anterior parietal cortex. This anterior parietal area may correspond to an area recruited for movement counting identified by recent single-neuron studies in monkeys. These results suggest that overlapping but not identical networks of areas are involved in counting sequences of sensory stimuli and sequences of movements in the human brain. [less ▲]

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See detailNeural Correlates of Envisioning Emotional Events in the near and Far Future
D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg; Xue, Gui; Lu, Zhong-Lin et al

in NeuroImage (2008), 40(1), 398-407

Being able to envision emotional events that might happen in the future has a clear adaptive value. This study addressed the functional neuroanatomy of this process and investigated whether it is ... [more ▼]

Being able to envision emotional events that might happen in the future has a clear adaptive value. This study addressed the functional neuroanatomy of this process and investigated whether it is modulated by temporal distance. Participants imagined positive and negative events pertaining to the near future or far future while their brain activity was measured with fMRI. The results demonstrate that the anterior part of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) was more active in envisioning emotional events in the far future than in the near future, whereas the caudate nucleus was engaged in envisioning emotional (especially positive) situations in the near future. We argue that the anterior part of the vmPFC might assign emotional values to mental representations of future events that pertain to long-term goals. On the other hand, the caudate might support more concrete simulations of action plans to achieve rewarding situations in the near future. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 70 (6 ULg)