Browsing
     by title


0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

or enter first few letters:   
OK
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailIntegrating roots into a whole plant network of flowering time genes in Arabidopsis thaliana
Bouché, Frédéric ULg; D'Aloia, Maria; Tocquin, Pierre ULg et al

in Scientific Reports (2016), 6

Molecular data concerning the involvement of roots in the genetic pathways regulating floral transition are lacking. In this study, we performed global analyses of the root transcriptome in Arabidopsis in ... [more ▼]

Molecular data concerning the involvement of roots in the genetic pathways regulating floral transition are lacking. In this study, we performed global analyses of the root transcriptome in Arabidopsis in order to identify flowering time genes that are expressed in the roots and genes that are differentially expressed in the roots during the induction of flowering. Data mining of public microarray experiments uncovered that about 200 genes whose mutations are reported to alter flowering time are expressed in the roots (i.e. were detected in more than 50% of the microarrays). However, only a few flowering integrator genes passed the analysis cutoff. Comparison of root transcriptome in short days and during synchronized induction of flowering by a single 22-h long day revealed that 595 genes were differentially expressed. Enrichment analyses of differentially expressed genes in root tissues, gene ontology categories, and cis-regulatory elements converged towards sugar signaling. We concluded that roots are integrated in systemic signaling, whereby carbon supply coordinates growth at the whole plant level during the induction of flowering. This coordination could involve the root circadian clock and cytokinin biosynthesis as a feed forward loop towards the shoot. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 69 (14 ULg)
Full Text
See detailIntegrating roots into a whole-plant map of flowering-time gene networks in Arabidopsis thaliana
Bouché, Frédéric ULg

Doctoral thesis (2015)

Flowering is a crucial step in plant development that needs to be carefully regulated to occur at the right time of the year, thus ensuring reproductive success. In Arabidopsis thaliana, several ... [more ▼]

Flowering is a crucial step in plant development that needs to be carefully regulated to occur at the right time of the year, thus ensuring reproductive success. In Arabidopsis thaliana, several interconnected molecular networks have been disclosed that mediate flowering response to environmental cues, such as photoperiod and temperature, or to endogenous factors, such as plant age or hormones. Many of these signalling pathways are systemic, i.e. involve regulatory mechanisms distant from the shoot apical meristem where floral transition eventually occurs. However, most investigations were focused on the aerial parts of the plant but ignored the roots. The aim of this Ph.D. thesis was to integrate the roots into a comprehensive overview of the genetic control of flowering in Arabidopsis. A prerequisite was to obtain a full list of known flowering-time genes. This step led to the creation of a database of flowering-time genes, which is accessible online and in which users can navigate through data tables or interactive schemes (www.flor-id.org). In the second part of the work, we studied the involvement of the roots in the differential developmental rates of plants grown in hydroponics and on soil. In the third part of the work, we used data mining analyses to show that about 200 flowering-time genes are expressed in the roots of Arabidopsis. Using a complementary approach, we analysed the root transcriptome to identify early changes occurring during the induction of flowering by a photoperiodic treatment. Collectively, the results presented in this work brought new insights in the regulation of flowering time at the whole-organism scale by integrating the “hidden part” of plants in the current landscape of the molecular processes controlling phase transitions in Arabidopsis thaliana. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 198 (19 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailIntegrating Science and Technology into Sports: A Case Study of Sports Innovations in Belgium
Van Oudheusden, Michiel ULg; Van Hoyweghen, Ine

Conference (2016, September 01)

This paper explores the dynamic interplay between sports and innovation policies, research and development processes, and science-driven sports practices in Wallonia and Flanders (Belgium). Here, as in ... [more ▼]

This paper explores the dynamic interplay between sports and innovation policies, research and development processes, and science-driven sports practices in Wallonia and Flanders (Belgium). Here, as in other countries and regions, the aim of integrating science and technology into sports is now a leading sports policy principle and innovation strategy. Building on science and technology studies (STS) tools and methods (vision assessment, multi-site ethnography, foresight), the paper draws out the ethical, legal, and social issues (ELSI) induced by the use of new sciences and technologies in sports. These ELSI include the client-centered nature of sports science, which raises concerns about occupational control and athlete welfare, the uptake of genetic data in sports talent detection programs, and the challenges of coordinating "data-driven" and "intuitive" sports training approaches. It is argued that as sports are scientized and technologized, such ELSI demand to be addressed by sports innovators, governing bodies, and publics. By drawing critical attention to how sports are increasingly shaped by devices, data flows, and scientists, the paper states the case for bringing sports into STS and STS into sports. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 28 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailIntegrating sediment biogeochemistry into 3D oceanic models: A study of benthic-pelagic coupling in the Black Sea
Capet, Arthur ULg; Meysman, Filip; Akoumianaki, Ioanna et al

in Ocean Modelling (2016), 101

Three-dimensional (3D) ecosystem models of shelf environments should properly account for the biogeochemical cycling within the sea floor. However, a full and explicit representation of sediment ... [more ▼]

Three-dimensional (3D) ecosystem models of shelf environments should properly account for the biogeochemical cycling within the sea floor. However, a full and explicit representation of sediment biogeochemistry into 3D ocean models is computationally demanding. Here, we describe a simplified approach to include benthic processes in 3D ocean models, which includes a parameterization of the different pathways for organic matter mineralization and allows for organic matter remobilization by bottom currents and waves. This efficient approach enables decadal simulations that resolve the inertial contribution of the sea floor to the biogeochemical cycling in shelf environments. The model was implemented to analyze the benthic-pelagic coupling in the northwestern shelf of the Black Sea. Three distinct biogeochemical provinces were identified on the basis of fluxes and rates associated with benthic-pelagic coupling. Our model simulations suitably capture the seasonal variability of in situ flux data as well as their regional variation, which stresses the importance of incorporating temporally varying sediment biogeochemistry and resuspension/redeposition cycles in shelf ecosystem models. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 26 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailIntegrating Social Aspect into Sustainability Assessment of Bio-Based Industries: Towards a Systemic Approach
Rafiaani, P.; Van Passel, S.; Lebailly, Philippe ULg et al

in Ban, Marko et al. (Ed.) 11th Conference on Sustainable Development of Energy, Water and Environment Systems : book of abstracts (2016)

Biobased industries require to be assessed on their positive and negative impacts on sustainable development. However, social factors are usually neglected in the majority of impact assessments of ... [more ▼]

Biobased industries require to be assessed on their positive and negative impacts on sustainable development. However, social factors are usually neglected in the majority of impact assessments of biobased industries: they are mainly focused on environmental performance and (techno)- economic assessments. This review proposes a new systemic approach for assessing and integrating the social dimension into sustainability assessments of biobased industries. First the main methodologies for assessing social impacts in biobased industries are compared. Social Life Cycle Analysis (SLCA) is considered to have promising methodological attributes for biobased industries’ social sustainability assessment, although it is still in its early steps of development. Second, a new systemic framework was developed following the four main iterative steps of an SLCA framework and based on three useful SLCA-based approaches including Product Social Impact Assessment; Prosuite and the UNEP SETAC Guidelines for SLCA of Products. The proposed framework allows incorporating the social impacts into a techno economic assessments (TEA) model through providing both a final social score and separate scores for each indicator category and life cycle phase. The result of this study particularly highlights the importance of considering social issues in biobased industries’design and innovation. Using the proposed systemic approach, industry and policy makers gain a better insight into the full sustainability performance (i.e. including social aspects) of biobased industries. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 13 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailIntegrating social aspects into sustainability assessment of biobased industries: Towards a systemic approach
Rafiaani, Parisa; Van Passel, Steven; Lebailly, Philippe ULg et al

in Benoit Norris, Catherine; Norris, Gregory (Eds.) 5th International Social LCA Conference Harvard, Cambridge, USA, June 13 - 15, 2016: book of abstracts (2016)

Considering its potential impacts on development, biobased industries require to be assessed according to the positive and negative effects they can bring to the society. Typically, the implications of ... [more ▼]

Considering its potential impacts on development, biobased industries require to be assessed according to the positive and negative effects they can bring to the society. Typically, the implications of biobased industries are considered in terms of economic, environmental and technical indices while social factors are usually neglected in the majority of impact assessments. This is mainly due to the fact that social issues are not easy to be quantitatively analyzed, measured and monitored. Indeed, the following issues need to be addressed: (i) how the social dimension is understood from different stakeholders’ perspective; (ii) how the social pillar can be properly integrated into sustainability evaluation methodologies which are mainly focused on environmental performance and (techno)-economic assessments of biobased industries. This review paper aims to answer these questions firstly through identifying the main social impacts and indicators of the biobased industries at local level in order to find an answer for the second question by analyzing and comparing the current methodologies for assessing social impacts in bioindustries. These methods mainly include Social Impact Assessment (SIA), Socio-economic Impacts Assessment (SEIA) and Social Life Cycle Analysis (SLCA). The latter, although is in its early steps of development, has been considered to have substantially promising methodological attributes for bioindustries’ social sustainability assessment. Although ongoing research tackles the incorporation of the environmental dimension into extended techno-economic assessments, no integration of the social pillar into such assessments has been made. Given that, this review focuses on the social dimension for integrated sustainability assessments of biobased industries to assess the main social impacts resulting from each operation or from the bioenergy sector. The current review focuses on the importance of social sustainability indicators and evaluation techniques. By discussing the methodologies for evaluating social impacts, a systemic methodology for assessing and integrating the social dimension into the sustainability assessments of bioindustries is developed, considering the four main iterative steps of an SLCA framework and three useful SLCA-based approaches including Product Social Impact Assessment; Prosuite and the UNEP SETAC Guidelines for SLCA of Products. It is concluded that the term systemic analysis implies that the whole approach needs the capacity to understand different subsystems and relations between them. Accordingly, the systemic assessment of biobased technologies should simultaneously include technological, economic, social and environmental dimensions. The result of this study identifies social impacts in the bioeconomy and particularly highlight the importance of considering social issues in biobased industries’ design and innovation. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 58 (1 ULg)
Full Text
See detailIntegrating soil and plant knowledge at different scales to better understand the dynamics of water in SPAC.
Lobet, Guillaume ULg; Pagès, L.; Chaumont, F. et al

Conference (2008)

Detailed reference viewed: 9 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailIntegrating structural and input design of a 2-DOF high-speed parallel manipulator: A flexible model-based approach
da Silva, M. M.; de Oliveira, L. P. R.; Bruls, Olivier ULg et al

in Mechanism & Machine Theory (2010), 45

This paper discusses the integrated design of parallel manipulators, which exhibit varying dynamics. This characteristic affects the machine stability and performance. The design methodology consists of ... [more ▼]

This paper discusses the integrated design of parallel manipulators, which exhibit varying dynamics. This characteristic affects the machine stability and performance. The design methodology consists of four main steps: (i) the system modeling using flexible multibody technique, (ii) the synthesis of reduced-order models suitable for control design, (iii) the systematic flexible model-based input signal design, and (iv) the evaluation of some possible machine designs. The novelty in this methodology is to take structural flexibilities into consideration during the input signal design; therefore, enhancing the standard design process which mainly considers rigid bodies dynamics. The potential of the proposed strategy is exploited for the design evaluation of a two degree-of-freedom high-speed parallel manipulator. The results are experimentally validated. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 39 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailIntegrating Succession and Gender Issues from the Perspective of the Daughter of Family Enterprise across the U.S. and EU
Constantinidis, Christina ULg; Nelson, Teresa

in Management International = International Management = Gestión Internacional (2009), 14(1), 43-54

We engage a gender analysis, including consideration of the social phenomena of separation and hierarchy, to consider the role, condition and aspirations of daughters of family enterprise as they consider ... [more ▼]

We engage a gender analysis, including consideration of the social phenomena of separation and hierarchy, to consider the role, condition and aspirations of daughters of family enterprise as they consider the option of family entrepreneurship. From this perspective we examine the extant literature and present findings from two exploratory empirical research efforts, one in Belgium and one in the U.S., to better understand internationally how daughters perceive their leadership paths in the family business. We take into consideration growing social acceptance of women’s leadership, and women’s own career-mindedness, which influence traditional views of the opportunities for daughters inside and outside of the family business. Research avenues and practical recommendations to support successful succession of daughters are discussed. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 69 (16 ULg)
Full Text
See detailIntegrating Succession and Gender Issues from the Perspective of the Daughter of Family Enterprise across the U.S. and EU
Constantinidis, Christina ULg; Nelson, Teresa

Conference (2008, November 04)

We engage a gender analysis, including consideration of the social phenomena of separation and hierarchy, to consider the role, condition and aspirations of daughters of family enterprise. From this ... [more ▼]

We engage a gender analysis, including consideration of the social phenomena of separation and hierarchy, to consider the role, condition and aspirations of daughters of family enterprise. From this perspective we examine the extant literature and present findings from two exploratory empirical research efforts, one in the EU and one in the U.S., to better understand how daughters perceive their leadership paths in the family business internationally. We take into consideration growing social acceptance of women’s leadership, and women’s own career-mindedness, which influence traditional views of the opportunities for daughters inside and outside of the family business. Research avenues and practical recommendations to support successful succession of daughters are discussed. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 91 (8 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailIntegrating the impact of wheat fungal diseases in the Belgian crop yield forecasting system (B-CYFS)
El Jarroudi, Moussa ULg

in European Journal of Agronomy (2012), 40

Field experiments were conducted over four growing seasons to assess the relationship between fungal disease attacks and wheat grain yield in the agrometeorological part of the Belgian crop yield ... [more ▼]

Field experiments were conducted over four growing seasons to assess the relationship between fungal disease attacks and wheat grain yield in the agrometeorological part of the Belgian crop yield forecasting system (i.e., Belgian crop growth monitoring system, B-CGMS) by recalibrating the lifespan of wheat leaves (SPAN parameter). The results from 133 experimental fields in Belgium (the Wallonia region) and the Grand-Duchy of Luxembourg were analyzed in terms of site factors such as cultivar, previous crop, sowing date and geographical area. A significant relationship was found between green leaf area (GLA) duration expressing the infection pressure (parameter m; using a modified Gompertz model and calculated from observed GLA) and final grain yield (R2 = 0.79; P < 0.001). Based on this relationship and by recalibrating the B-CGMS in terms of its SPAN parameter, there was a significant improvement in estimating final grain yield. From a R2 of 0.11 when the B-CGMS was run with the default SPAN value, the relationship between observed and simulated yields was strengthened, with a R2 of 0.47 and 0.57, respectively, when a linear or quadratic relationship was considered between m and SPAN. Although, from a practical point of view, the m value has to be estimated annually for each spatial grid or group of grids on the basis of field or possibly remotely sensed data, and although estimating this parameter is possible only late in the season, these encouraging results illustrate the potential of integrating pest and disease impact in the B-CGMS. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 72 (16 ULg)
Full Text
See detailIntegrating the weight of history into the alignment framework: the case of distributed generation technologies
Bauwens, Thomas ULg

E-print/Working paper (2014)

Whereas a centralized energy supply system is still dominant today, the energy sector is currently witnessing the development of small-scale and more geographically dispersed generation units, so-called ... [more ▼]

Whereas a centralized energy supply system is still dominant today, the energy sector is currently witnessing the development of small-scale and more geographically dispersed generation units, so-called distributed generation technologies. So-called "alignment framework" proposes a very useful approach to look at this evolution. Yet, we argue in this paper that this framework does not fully take into account the inertia associated with past technological and institutional choices that may hinder future changes. Relying on the concept of socio-technical lock-in, we illustrate this point with the case of the diffusion of distributed generation technologies. Based on this analysis, we propose an adaptation of the alignment framework to integrate these elements. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 82 (5 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailIntegrating tools, to approach the development of competencies
Poumay, Marianne ULg

Conference (2012, May)

The presentation will address the problem of integrating different tools in order to support competence development and evaluation amongst students in Higher Education. It will focus on students' self ... [more ▼]

The presentation will address the problem of integrating different tools in order to support competence development and evaluation amongst students in Higher Education. It will focus on students' self-regulation and discuss the difficulty of complementing low-level activities and spend more time with integrated ones,... towards the development of competences. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 31 (7 ULg)
See detailIntegrating water chemistry using a diatom-based index
Lavoie, Isabelle; Campeau, Stéphane; Darchambeau, François ULg et al

Poster (2006, March 02)

Detailed reference viewed: 6 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailIntegration Analysis of Three Omics Data Using Penalized Regression Methods: An Application to Bladder Cancer
Pineda San Juan, Silvia ULg; Real, Francisco X; Kogevinas, Manolis et al

in PLoS Genetics (2015)

Detailed reference viewed: 42 (6 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailIntegration and Policy in Belgium and in the EU
Martiniello, Marco ULg

in The Forum (2010), (Fall), 163-168

Detailed reference viewed: 179 (18 ULg)
Full Text
See detailL’intégration architecturale et urbaine des vestiges archéologiques
Teller, Jacques ULg; Lefert, S.

in Actes du Colloque International APPEAR (2004)

Detailed reference viewed: 60 (6 ULg)