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See detailAntibodies to varicella-zoster virus modulate antigen distribution in cultured infected cells
Marc, Ph.; Sadzot-Delvaux, Catherine ULiege; Merville, Marie-Paule ULiege et al

in Archives Internationales de Physiologie et de Biochimie (1989), 97

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See detailAntibody evasion by a gammaherpesvirus o-glycan shield.
Machiels, Bénédicte ULiege; Lété, Céline ULiege; Guillaume, Antoine ULiege et al

in PLoS Pathogens (2011), 7(11), 1002387

All gammaherpesviruses encode a major glycoprotein homologous to the Epstein-Barr virus gp350. These glycoproteins are often involved in cell binding, and some provide neutralization targets. However, the ... [more ▼]

All gammaherpesviruses encode a major glycoprotein homologous to the Epstein-Barr virus gp350. These glycoproteins are often involved in cell binding, and some provide neutralization targets. However, the capacity of gammaherpesviruses for long-term transmission from immune hosts implies that in vivo neutralization is incomplete. In this study, we used Bovine Herpesvirus 4 (BoHV-4) to determine how its gp350 homolog - gp180 - contributes to virus replication and neutralization. A lack of gp180 had no impact on the establishment and maintenance of BoHV-4 latency, but markedly sensitized virions to neutralization by immune sera. Antibody had greater access to gB, gH and gL on gp180-deficient virions, including neutralization epitopes. Gp180 appears to be highly O-glycosylated, and removing O-linked glycans from virions also sensitized them to neutralization. It therefore appeared that gp180 provides part of a glycan shield for otherwise vulnerable viral epitopes. Interestingly, this O-glycan shield could be exploited for neutralization by lectins and carbohydrate-specific antibody. The conservation of O-glycosylation sites in all gp350 homologs suggests that this is a general evasion mechanism that may also provide a therapeutic target. [less ▲]

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See detailAntibody evasion by a gammaherpesvirus O-glycan shield.
Machiels, Bénédicte ULiege; Gillet, Laurent ULiege

Conference (2011, November)

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See detailAntibody evasion by the N terminus of murid herpesvirus-4 glycoprotein B.
Gillet, Laurent ULiege; Stevenson, Philip G

in EMBO Journal (2007), 26(24), 5131-42

Herpesviruses characteristically transmit infection from immune hosts. Although their success in escaping neutralization by pre-formed antibody is indisputable, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain ... [more ▼]

Herpesviruses characteristically transmit infection from immune hosts. Although their success in escaping neutralization by pre-formed antibody is indisputable, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain largely unknown. Glycoprotein B (gB) is the most conserved component of the herpesvirus entry machinery and its N terminus (gB-NT) is a common neutralization target. We used murid herpesvirus-4 to determine how gB-NT contributes to the virus-antibody interaction. Deleting gB-NT had no obvious impact on virus replication, but paradoxically increased virion neutralization by immune sera. This reflected greater antibody access to neutralization epitopes on gH/gL, with which gB was associated. gB-NT itself was variably protected against antibody by O-linked glycans; on virions from epithelial cells it was protected almost completely. gB-NT therefore provides a protective and largely protected cover for a vulnerable part of gH/gL. The conservation of predicted glycosylation sites in other mammalian herpesvirus gB-NTs suggests that this evasion mechanism is widespread. Interestingly, the gB-NT glycans that blocked antibody binding could be targeted for neutralization instead by a lectin, suggesting a means of therapeutic counterattack. [less ▲]

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See detailAntibody formation and plasma profiles of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and IGF-binding proteins in growing heifers after sustained-release exogenous BST administration
Bertozzi, Carlo; Portetelle, Daniel ULiege; Massart, Serge et al

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement = Biotechnology, Agronomy, Society and Environment [=BASE] (1998), 2(special issue), 45

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See detailAntibody formation and plasma profiles of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and IGF-binding proteins in growing heifers after sustained-release exogenous BST administration.
Bertozzi, Carlo; Portetelle, Daniel ULiege; Massart, Serge et al

in 3° Internat. Conf. farm Anim. Endocrinol. (1998)

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See detailAntibody production by injection of living cells expressing non self antigens as cell surface type II transmembrane fusion protein.
Nizet, Yannick; Gillet, Laurent ULiege; SCHROEDER, Hélène ULiege et al

in Journal of immunological methods (2011)

Antigen expression and purification are laborious, time consuming and frequently difficult steps in the process of antibody production. In the present study, we developed a method avoiding these two steps ... [more ▼]

Antigen expression and purification are laborious, time consuming and frequently difficult steps in the process of antibody production. In the present study, we developed a method avoiding these two steps. This method relies on the injection of histocompatible living cells stably expressing the antigen as a cell surface type II transmembrane fusion protein. A vector, nicknamed pCD1-CD134L, was constructed to express the antigen fused at the carboxyterminal end of the human CD134 ligand (CD134L) type II transmembrane protein on the surface of eucaryotic cells. This vector was shown to induce cell surface expression of epitopes from human c-Myc (soluble protein), uterogloblin-related protein 1 (secreted protein) and CD94 (type II transmembrane protein). Using this vector, we developed a method to produce antibodies without antigen production. The flowchart of this method is as follows: (i) cloning of the antigen in the pCD1-CD134L vector; (ii) production of a histocompatible cell line stably expressing the CD134L-antigen fusion protein; (iii) testing for cell surface expression of the fusion protein by targeting the CD134L carrier; and (iv) prime-boost immunisation with living cells expressing the fusion protein. This method was successfully used for production of polyclonal antibodies raised against Ixodes ricinus calreticulin (secreted protein) in mice and for production of monoclonal antibodies raised against an epitope of Vaccinia virus A56 (type I transmembrane protein) protein in rat. The present study is the first to demonstrate the use of a type II transmembrane protein as a carrier for cell surface display of antigens. [less ▲]

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See detailAntibody Response to Glycoprotein E after Bovine Herpesvirus Type 1 Infection in Passively Immunised, Glycoprotein E-Negative Calves
Lemaire, Mylène; Schynts, Frédérick; Meyer, Gilles et al

in Veterinary Record : Journal of the British Veterinary Association (1999), 144(7), 172-6

This study was conducted to determine whether young calves with maternal antibodies against bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BHV-1) but without antibodies against glycoprotein E (gE) can produce an active ... [more ▼]

This study was conducted to determine whether young calves with maternal antibodies against bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BHV-1) but without antibodies against glycoprotein E (gE) can produce an active antibody response to gE after a BHV-1 infection. Five calves received at birth colostrum from gE-seronegative cows which had been vaccinated two or three times with an inactivated BHV-1, gE-deleted marker vaccine. After inoculation with a wild-type virulent strain of BHV-1, all the passively immunised gE-negative calves shed virus in large amounts in their nasal secretions. All the calves seroconverted to gE within two to four weeks after inoculation and then had high levels of gE antibodies for at least four months. The development of an active cell-mediated immune response was also detected by in vitro BHV-1-specific interferon-gamma assays. All the calves were latently infected, because one of them re-excreted the virus spontaneously and the other four did so after being treated with dexamethasone. The results showed that under the conditions of this work the gE-negative marker could also distinguish between passively immunised and latently infected calves. [less ▲]

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See detailANTIBODY-COUPLED NANORODS AS BIOSENSOR PLATFORM FOR SPECIFIC CANCER DETECTION
Schol, Daureen ULiege

Doctoral thesis (2013)

This work started as part of a Specific Targeted Research Project, ADONIS (FP-6 of the European Commission) and the aim of the project was the development of active targeting gold nanoparticles for ... [more ▼]

This work started as part of a Specific Targeted Research Project, ADONIS (FP-6 of the European Commission) and the aim of the project was the development of active targeting gold nanoparticles for optoacoustic imaging, from chemistry to biology. The establishment of a biosensor composed of antibody-functionalized gold nanorods is achieved on a model of tumor, in our case prostate cancer. Prostate cancer is a major public health problem in our industrialized countries, indeed it is the most frequent cancer and the second leading cause of death by cancer in men [1]. A major challenge in prostate cancer oncology is to develop more accurate, precise and less invasive tools for early stage diagnostic, including more accurate imaging assessments than those currently available. An efficient imaging technique which significantly improves the sensitivity and the specificity of the diagnostic and enables prediction of the cancer behavior would be extremely valuable to oncologists. Briefly the developed biosensor model consists of a gold nanorod – designed to convert a primary optical excitation into a detectable acoustic signal – coupled with a monoclonal antibody that targets prostate cancer cells for a specific recognition. Improved access to the target can be achieved by targeting accessible extracellular domain of a membrane protein, here the Prostate Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA) [2]. PSMA is a transmembrane protein considered as a suitable biomarker for prostate cancer [3] and which is under intense investigation for use as an imaging and therapeutic target. PSMA is highly expressed in prostate cancers and also expressed in the tumor associated neovasculature of most solid cancers [4]. Before biological assessments the cytotoxic surfactant, essential to form rod-shaped nanoparticles, is exchanged by a mixture of two functionalized polyethylene glycol (PEG) molecules: HS-PEG-OMe for nanoparticle passivation and HS-PEG-NH2 for subsequent coupling with the antibody. The different cytotoxicity assays are achieved to establish the toxic threshold of the surfactant in order to know what CTAB concentration maybe tolerable on the cells. This argument is important during the displacement of the surfactant, based on successive centrifugations, because the whole discard of CTAB seem to be time-consuming or even routinely unfeasible. Once this threshold drawn up, the PEGylated GNRs can be assessed on cancer cells, what seems being a common in vitro investigation. However unexpected issues came up during the experiments and had to be considered due to the properties of the nanomaterial. Nevertheless, after cytotoxicity assessment of PEGylated nanoparticles, the biosensor binding on targeted cells was assessed by fluorescence and scanning electron microscopies, two straightforward and flexible techniques. The antibody coupled to the gold nanorod is specific to the human prostate carcinoma LNCaP cell line, reported to express PSMA which is an admitted biomarker of this cell line [5]. Finally, in order to complete the specific targeting of the biosensor, the antibody-coupled gold nanorods are injected in nude mice to evaluate their biodistribution and bioaccumulation for which inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP/MS) is the technique of choice. Preliminary optoacoustic imaging is the ultimate step for the state-of-theart of the developed biosensor. Although the promising end results, particularly biodistribution assays, new questioning swarm and this is more and more discussed in publications due to the in vivo use of nanomaterials. Owing to their increasingly extensive use, their nanometer sizes and their physiological contact (more or less long), controlling the interaction of nanoparticles with biological systems became a fundamental challenge of nanomedicine [6]. Therefore the protein opsonization on the gold nanorods is a tremendous study and is accomplished via mass spectrometry analyses. [less ▲]

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See detailAntibubble lifetime: influence of the bulk viscosity and of the surface modulus of the mixture
Dorbolo, Stéphane ULiege; Delhalle, René ULiege; Dujardin, Julien ULiege et al

in Colloids and Surfaces A : Physicochemical and Engineering Aspects (2010)

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See detailAntibubble: role of the nature of the surfactant
Dorbolo, Stéphane ULiege; Vandewalle, Nicolas ULiege

Poster (2012)

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See detailAntibubbles dynamics: the drainage of an air film with incompressible interfaces
Scheid, Benoit; Dorbolo, Stéphane ULiege; Arriaga, Laura et al

in Physical Review Letters (2012)

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See detailAntibubbles, liquid onions and bouncing droplets
Vandewalle, Nicolas ULiege; Terwagne, Denis ULiege; Gilet, Tristan ULiege et al

in Colloids and Surfaces A : Physicochemical and Engineering Aspects (2009), 344

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See detailAntibubbles, liquid onions and mayonnaise droplets
Vandewalle, Nicolas ULiege; Dorbolo, Stéphane ULiege; Gilet, Tristan ULiege et al

Poster (2009, May)

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See detailAnticancer activities of Strychnopentamine
Quetin-Leclercq; Bouzahza, B; De Pauw-Gillet, Marie-Claire ULiege et al

Poster (1992)

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See detailAn anticancer molecule stemming from a plant root produced in a bioreactor
Vassaux, Antoine; Tarayre, Cédric ULiege; Delvigne, Frank ULiege et al

Poster (2017, May 24)

Secondary metabolites produced by plants or their symbionts have already shown specific properties: anticancer, anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, antifungal effects, etc. Astin C is a non-ribosomal ... [more ▼]

Secondary metabolites produced by plants or their symbionts have already shown specific properties: anticancer, anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, antifungal effects, etc. Astin C is a non-ribosomal peptide (secondary metabolite) produced by the fungus Villosirosea asteris, endosymbiont of the medicinal plant Aster tataricus, which has shown an interesting anticancer activity. The current challenge is the production of the molecule on a large scale and in higher quantities, either from the original fungus through fermentation technologies, or by a heterologous yeast strain having integrated the genes involved in the astin C biosynthesis pathway. The purpose of this workshop is to highlight the implementation possibilities of a strain producing a metabolite of interest. [less ▲]

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See detailANTICANCER, ANTIPLASMODIAL AND ANTITRYPANOSOMAL ACTIVITIES OF CRUDE EXTRACTS OF PLATANUS ORIENTALIS
Ebralidze, L.; Mskhiladze, Lasha; Ledoux, Allison ULiege et al

in World Journal of Pharmaceutical Research (2017), 6(3), 170-175

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See detailLes antichambres de l'humanité. Armel Job et l'expérience littéraire
Cormann, Grégory ULiege

Article for general public (2014)

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See detail«Antiche poesie italiane inedite nel ms. Stockholm, Kungliga Biblioteket, Vu 14»
Moreno, Paola ULiege

in Medioevo Romanzo (1998), XXIII

Detailed reference viewed: 29 (2 ULiège)
See detailAntichità/Unità : Storia, cultura e cinema in Italia
Curreri, Luciano ULiege; Ferro, Licia; Palumbo, Giuseppe

Book published by Nerosubianco (2013)

Detailed reference viewed: 13 (2 ULiège)