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See detailNeuropeptides and related substances in the pulmonary function.
Lekeux, Pierre ULg; Desmecht, Daniel ULg

in Lekeux, Pierre (Ed.) Pulmonary Function in Healthy, Exercising and Diseased Animals (1993)

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See detailNeuropeptides and the thymus
Geenen, Vincent ULg

Conference given outside the academic context (1990)

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See detailNeuropeptides cutanés
Tassoudji, Nazli ULg; Nikkels, Arjen ULg; Pierard, Gérald ULg

in Les Nouvelles Dermatologiques (1994), 13

The neuropeptides act as mediators in the transmission of nervous influx and as messengers between the nervous system and other cell populations. The skin contains numerous neuropeptides which are ... [more ▼]

The neuropeptides act as mediators in the transmission of nervous influx and as messengers between the nervous system and other cell populations. The skin contains numerous neuropeptides which are involved in the regulation of inflammation, immunomodulation, and thermoregulation. Cutaneous trophicity, pigmentation, and to a lesser extent sebaccous secretions are also influenced by neuropeptides. This review describes the functions of the most important neuropeptides encountered at the level of the skin. [less ▲]

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See detailNeurophysines et cancer pulmonaire a petites cellules
Pirard, Françoise; Pequeux, Christel ULg; Hendrick, J. C. et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (1997), 52(1), 22-6

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See detailNeurophysins as markers of ADH and oxytocin release
Legros, Jean-Jacques ULg; Geenen, Vincent ULg; Carvelli, Thierry ULg et al

in Hormone Research (1990), 34

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See detailNeurophysins as markers of vasopressin and oxytocin release. A study in carcinoma of the lung.
Legros, Jean-Jacques ULg; Geenen, Vincent ULg; Carvelli, T et al

in Hormone Research (1990), 34(3-4), 151-5

Vasopressin-neurophysin (hNpI), oxytocin-neurophysin (hNpII) and blood osmolality were assayed before any treatment in basal conditions in 35 patients suffering from lung carcinoma (20 oat cell, 6 ... [more ▼]

Vasopressin-neurophysin (hNpI), oxytocin-neurophysin (hNpII) and blood osmolality were assayed before any treatment in basal conditions in 35 patients suffering from lung carcinoma (20 oat cell, 6 undifferentiated and 9 well-differentiated epidermoid cell carcinomas). Plasma vasopressin (antidiuretic hormone, ADH) was also assayed in 7 of the 20 patients suffering from oat cell carcinoma. We found a close correlation (r = 0.98) between plasma ADH and hNpI levels in the 7 patients. Further, hNpI was elevated in 13 out of the 20 oat cell carcinoma patients and in none of the epidermoid-cell carcinoma group; however, searching for an abnormality of ADH secretion as reflected by a detectable plasma hNpI level together with subnormal plasma osmolality revealed 2 additional positive results in the oat cell carcinoma group, and 2 out of the 6 in the undifferentiated-cell carcinoma group. hNpII was increased together with an increase in hNpI in 6 oat cell carcinoma patients; it was specifically increased without hNpI increment in 2 additional oat cell carcinoma patients and in 2 patients of the undifferentiated-cell carcinoma group (different from the 2 positive for the hNpI-osmolality ratio). hNpI and hNpII were normal in the majority of undifferentiated and all of the differentiated epidermoid-cell carcinoma group. Hence, our results show that simultaneous measurements of hNpI, hNpII, and blood osmolality could detect abnormalities in 17 out of 20 oat cell carcinoma patients, in 4 of the 9 undifferentiated-cell carcinoma patients, but in none of the differentiated epidermoid-cell carcinoma patients, suggesting that the neurophysin assay can be used for the early detection of oat cell- and possibly other neuroendocrine-derived carcinomas. [less ▲]

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See detailNeurophysins in central diabetes insipidus
Legros, Jean-Jacques ULg; Geenen, Vincent ULg

in Hormone Research (1996), 45

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See detailNeurophysins in mood disorders.
Scantamburlo, Gabrielle ULg; Ansseau, Marc ULg; Legros, Jean-Jacques ULg

in Neuropeptide Research Trends (2007)

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See detailNeurophysins response to apomorphine and clonidine in major depression
Scantamburlo, Gabrielle ULg; Ansseau, Marc ULg; Legros, Jean-Jacques ULg

in European Neuropsychopharmacology (2005, March), 15(Suppl. 1), 77-78

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See detailNeurophysiological approach to primary headache pathophysiology.
Lozza, A.; Proietti Cecchini, A.; Afra, J. et al

in Cephalalgia : An International Journal of Headache (1998), 18 Suppl 21

Electroencephalography (EEG), evoked potentials (EP), and electromyography (EMG) techniques are useful tools in the clinical assessment of headache and in understanding the pathophysiological mechanisms ... [more ▼]

Electroencephalography (EEG), evoked potentials (EP), and electromyography (EMG) techniques are useful tools in the clinical assessment of headache and in understanding the pathophysiological mechanisms of these pathologies. EEG and EP studies in migraine revealed functional abnormalities in cortical electrical activity and in sensory processing. EMG studies resulted in pain syndromes involving nerves or myofascial structures such as tension-type headache and cluster headache. Moreover, it was possible to test the effect of old and new drugs with the help of these neurophysiological techniques. An updated review is reported of the literature. [less ▲]

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See detailNeurophysiological basis of sleep and wakefulness
Chellappa, Sarah Laxhmi ULg; Schmidt, Christina; Cajochen, Christian

in Garbarino, Sergio (Ed.) Sleepiness and Human Impact Assessment (in press)

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See detailNeurophysiological correlates of hypnotic analgesia
Vanhaudenhuyse, Audrey ULg; Boly, Mélanie ULg; Laureys, Steven ULg et al

in Contemporary Hypnosis (2009), 26(1), 1523

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See detailNeurophysiological correlates of hypnotic analgesia
Vanhaudenhuyse, Audrey ULg; Boly, Mélanie ULg; Laureys, Steven ULg et al

in Contemporary Hypnosis (2009), 26(1), 15-23

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See detailNEUROPHYSIOLOGICAL CORRELATES OF HYPNOTIC ANALGESIA
Vanhaudenhuyse, Audrey ULg; Boly, Mélanie ULg; LAUREYS, Steven ULg et al

in Contemporary Hypnosis (2009), 26(1), 15-23

This short review describes recent advances in understanding hypnotic modulation of pain. Our current understanding of pain perception is followed by a critical review of the hypnotic analgesia studies ... [more ▼]

This short review describes recent advances in understanding hypnotic modulation of pain. Our current understanding of pain perception is followed by a critical review of the hypnotic analgesia studies using EEG, evoked potential and functional imaging methodologies. [less ▲]

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See detailNeurophysiological features of the migrainous brain
Schoenen, Jean ULg

in Neurological Sciences (2006), 27(Suppl. 2), 77-81

Migraine is a disorder in which central nervous system (CNS) dysfunction might play a pivotal role. As there are no consistent structural disturbances, clinical neurophysiology methods seem particularly ... [more ▼]

Migraine is a disorder in which central nervous system (CNS) dysfunction might play a pivotal role. As there are no consistent structural disturbances, clinical neurophysiology methods seem particularly suited to study its pathophysiology. This chapter will focus on a review of neurophysiological studies that have provided an insight into migraine pathogenesis. The results are in part contradictory, which may be due to the methodology, patient selection or timing of study. Nonetheless, quantitative electroencephalography and magnetoencephalography recordings during migraine attacks provide strong, though indirect, evidence favouring the occurrence of spreading cortical depression during attacks of migraine with, and possibly without, aura. Evoked cortical potential and nociceptive blink reflex studies demonstrate that lack of habituation during repetitive stimulation is a reproducible CNS dysfunction interictally in both migraine with and without aura. Transcranial magnetic stimulations show excitability changes of the visual cortex. The interictal migrainous CNS dysfunction is likely to play a role in migraine pathogenesis, has a familial character and undergoes periodic modulations with quasi-normalisation just before, during an attack and after treatment with certain prophylactic agents. In addition, neurophysiological methods have revealed subclinical abnormalities of cerebellar function and neuromuscular transmission, which may improve phenotyping of migraineurs for genetic and therapeutic studies. [less ▲]

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See detailNeurophysiological mechanisms of hypnosis
Faymonville, Marie-Elisabeth ULg; Maquet, Pierre ULg; Laureys, Steven ULg

in International Journal of Psychophysiology (2004, September), 54(1-2), 43-44

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See detailNeurophysiological studies in migraine
Schoenen, Jean ULg; Aurora, S.

in Olesen, J.; Goadsby, P.; Ramadan, N. (Eds.) et al The Headaches (2005)

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See detailNeurophysiological tests and neuroimaging procedures in non-acute headache (2nd edition).
Sandrini, G.; Friberg, L.; Coppola, G. et al

in European Journal of Neurology (2011), 18

Background and purpose: A large number of instrumental investigations are used in patients with non-acute headache in both research and clinical fields. Although the literature has shown that most of ... [more ▼]

Background and purpose: A large number of instrumental investigations are used in patients with non-acute headache in both research and clinical fields. Although the literature has shown that most of these tools contributed greatly to increasing understanding of the pathogenesis of primary headache, they are of little or no value in the clinical setting. Methods: This paper provides an update of the 2004 EFNS guidelines and recommendations for the use of neurophysiological tools and neuroimaging procedures in non-acute headache (first edition). Even though the period since the publication of the first edition has seen an increase in the number of published papers dealing with this topic, the updated guidelines contain only minimal changes in the levels of evidence and grades of recommendation. Results: (i) Interictal EEG is not routinely indicated in the diagnostic evaluation of patients with headache. Interictal EEG is, however, indicated if the clinical history suggests a possible diagnosis of epilepsy (differential diagnosis). Ictal EEG could be useful in certain patients suffering from hemiplegic or basilar migraine. (ii) Recording evoked potentials is not recommended for the diagnosis of headache disorders. (iii) There is no evidence warranting recommendation of reflex responses or autonomic tests for the routine clinical examination of patients with headache. (iv) Manual palpation of pericranial muscles, with standardized palpation pressure, can be recommended for subdividing patient groups but not for diagnosis. Pain threshold measurements and EMG are not recommended as clinical diagnostic tests. (v) In adult and pediatric patients with migraine, with no recent change in attack pattern, no history of seizures, and no other focal neurological symptoms or signs, the routine use of neuroimaging is not warranted. In patients with trigeminal autonomic cephalalgia, neuroimaging should be carefully considered and may necessitate additional scanning of intracranial/cervical vasculature and/or the sellar/orbital/(para)nasal region. In patients with atypical headache patterns, a history of seizures and/or focal neurological symptoms or signs, MRI may be indicated. (vi) If attacks can be fully accounted for by the standard headache classification (IHS), a PET or SPECT scan will normally be of no further diagnostic value. Nuclear medical examinations of the cerebral circulation and metabolism can be carried out in subgroups of patients with headache for the diagnosis and evaluation of complications, when patients experience unusually severe attacks or when the quality or severity of attacks has changed. (vii) Transcranial Doppler examination is not helpful in headache diagnosis. Conclusion: Although many of the examinations described in the present guidelines are of little or no value in the clinical setting, most of the tools, including thermal pain thresholds and transcranial magnetic stimulation, have considerable potential for differential diagnostic evaluation as well as for the further exploration of headache pathophysiology and the effects of pharmacological treatment. [less ▲]

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