Browsing
     by title


0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

or enter first few letters:   
OK
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailNeuroendocrine mechanisms controlling female puberty: new approaches, new concepts.
Ojeda, S.; Roth, C.; Mungenast, A. et al

in International Journal of Andrology (2006), 29

Detailed reference viewed: 7 (2 ULg)
See detailNeuroendocrine microenvironments in the immune system
Geenen, Vincent ULg

Conference given outside the academic context (1988)

Detailed reference viewed: 6 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailNeuroendocrine regulation of GnRH release in induced ovulators.
Bakker, Julie ULg; Baum, M. J.

in Frontiers in Neuroendocrinology (2000), 21(3), 220-62

GnRH is the key neuropeptide controlling reproductive function in all vertebrate species. Two different neuroendocrine mechanisms have evolved among female mammals to regulate the mediobasal hypothalamic ... [more ▼]

GnRH is the key neuropeptide controlling reproductive function in all vertebrate species. Two different neuroendocrine mechanisms have evolved among female mammals to regulate the mediobasal hypothalamic (MBH) release of GnRH leading to the preovulatory secretion of LH by the anterior pituitary gland. In females of spontaneously ovulating species, including rats, mice, guinea pigs, sheep, monkeys, and women, ovarian steroids secreted by maturing ovarian follicles induce a pulsatile pattern of GnRH release in the median eminence that, in turn, stimulates a preovulatory LH surge. In females of induced ovulating species, including rabbits, ferrets, cats, and camels, the preovulatory release of GnRH, and the resultant preovulatory LH surge, is induced by the receipt of genital somatosensory stimuli during mating. Induced ovulators generally do not show "spontaneous" steroid-induced LH surges during their reproductive cycles, suggesting that the positive feedback actions of steroid hormones on GnRH release are reduced or absent in these species. By contrast, mating-induced preovulatory surges occasionally occur in some spontaneously ovulating species. Most research in the field of GnRH neurobiology has been performed using spontaneous ovulators including rat, guinea pig, sheep, and rhesus monkey. This review summarizes the literature concerning the neuroendocrine mechanisms controlling GnRH biosynthesis and release in females of several induced ovulating species, and whenever possible it contrasts the results with those obtained for spontaneously ovulating species. It also considers the adaptive, evolutionary benefits and disadvantages of each type of ovulatory control mechanism. In females of induced ovulating species estradiol acts in the brain to induce aspects of proceptive and receptive sexual behavior. The primary mechanism involved in the preovulatory release of GnRH among induced ovulators involves the activation of midbrain and brainstem noradrenergic neurons in response to genital-somatosensory signals generated by receipt of an intromission from a male during mating. These noradrenergic neurons project to the MBH and, when activated, promote the release of GnRH from nerve terminals in the median eminence. In contrast to spontaneous ovulators, there is little evidence that endogenous opioid peptides normally inhibit MBH GnRH release among induced ovulators. Instead, the neural signals that induce a preovulatory LH surge in these species seem to be primarily excitatory. A complete understanding of the neuroendocrine control of ovulation will only be achieved in the future by comparative studies of several animal model systems in which mating-induced as well as spontaneous, hormonally stimulated activation of GnRH neurons drives the preovulatory LH surge. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 11 (2 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe neuroendocrine thymic microenvironment
Geenen, Vincent ULg; Legros, Jean-Jacques ULg; Adam, Francine et al

in Journal of Endocrinology (1986), 111 (Suppl.)

Detailed reference viewed: 6 (3 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe neuroendocrine thymus. Abundant occurrence of oxytocin-, vasopressin-, and neurophysin-like peptides in the thymus
Moll, Ute M.; Lane, Bernard L.; Robert, Françoise et al

in Histochemistry (1988), 89

Detailed reference viewed: 10 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe neuroendocrine thymus: Coexistence of oxytocin and neurophysin in the human thymus
Geenen, Vincent ULg; Legros, Jean-Jacques ULg; Franchimont, Paul et al

in Science (1986), 232

Detailed reference viewed: 37 (14 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailNeuroendocrine tumor of the nasal cavity (esthesioneuroblastome) : about one case with paraneoplastic Cushing's syndrome.
Reznik, Michel ULg; Melon, J.; Lambrichts, M. et al

in Oncology Overview (1989)

Detailed reference viewed: 17 (0 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailNeuroendocrine-Immune Interactions in T Cell Ontogeny
Geenen, Vincent ULg; Robert, Françoise; Fatemi, Marjaneh et al

in Thymus (1989), 13(3-4), 131-140

Detailed reference viewed: 10 (0 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailNeuroendocrine-Immunology: from systemic interactions to the immune tolerance of self neuroendocrine functions
Geenen, Vincent ULg; Robert, Françoise; Legros, Jean-Jacques ULg et al

in Acta Clinica Belgica (1991), 46

In recent years, it appeared more and more that the three major integrating and adaptive systems of intercellular communication, nervous, endocrine, and immune systems, are closely interconnected. Through ... [more ▼]

In recent years, it appeared more and more that the three major integrating and adaptive systems of intercellular communication, nervous, endocrine, and immune systems, are closely interconnected. Through these interactions, psychological and neurological influences can modulate the immune response (neuroimmunomodulation), while immune cells may communicate to the neuroendocrine system by a regulatory feedback loop. On the basis of our own observations, it has been shown that the neuroendocrine-immune dialogue occurs in the thymus during the early steps of T-cell differentiation, and could be involved both in T-cell positive as well as negative selections. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 19 (3 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailneuroendocrinology in the perinatal period
Battisti, Oreste ULg

in mini acta of belgian society of pediatrics (1995), 27

Detailed reference viewed: 12 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe neuroendocrinology of reproductive behavior in Japanese quail
Balthazart, Jacques ULg; Baillien, Michelle; Charlier, Thierry ULg et al

in Domestic Animal Endocrinology (2003), 25

Sex steroid hormones such as testosterone have widespread effects on brain physiology and function but one of their best characterized effects arguably involves the activation of male sexual behavior ... [more ▼]

Sex steroid hormones such as testosterone have widespread effects on brain physiology and function but one of their best characterized effects arguably involves the activation of male sexual behavior. During the past 20 years we have investigated the testosterone control of male sexual behavior in an avian species, the Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica).We briefly reviewhere the main features and advantages of this species relating to the investigation of fundamental questions in the field of behavioral neuroendocrinology, a field that studies inter-relationship among hormones, brain and behavior. Special attention is given to the intracellular metabolism of testosterone, in particular its aromatization into an estrogen, which plays a critical limiting role in the mediation of the behavioral effects of testosterone. Brain aromatase activity is controlled by steroids which increase the transcription of the enzyme, but afferent inputs that affect the intraneuronal concentrations of calcium also appear to have a pronounced effect on the enzyme activity through rapid changes in its phosphorylation status. The physiological significance of these slowgenomic and rapid, presumably non-genomic, changes in brain aromatase activity are also briefly discussed. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 55 (16 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailNeuroendocrinology of song behavior and avian brain plasticity: Multiple sites of action of sex steroid hormones
Ball, G. F.; Riters, L. V.; Balthazart, Jacques ULg

in Frontiers in Neuroendocrinology (2002), 23(2), 137-178

Seasonal changes in the brain of songbirds are one of the most dramatic examples of naturally occuring neuroplasticity that have been described in any vertebrate species. In males of temperate-zone ... [more ▼]

Seasonal changes in the brain of songbirds are one of the most dramatic examples of naturally occuring neuroplasticity that have been described in any vertebrate species. In males of temperate-zone songbird species, the volumes of several telencephalic nuclei that control song behavior are significantly larger in the spring than in the fall. These increases in volume are correlated with high rates of singing and high concentrations of testosterone in the plasma. Several song nuclei express either androgen receptors or estrogen receptors, therefore it is possible that testosterone acting via estrogenic or androgenic metabolites regulates song behavior by seasonally modulating the morphology of these song control nuclei. However, the causal links among these variables have not been established. Dissociations among high concentrations of testosterone, enlarged song nuclei, and high rates of singing behavior have been observed. Singing behavior itself can promote cellular changes associated with increases in the volume of the song control nuclei. Also, testosterone may stimulate song behavior by acting in brain regions outside of the song control system such as in the preoptic area or in catecholamine cell groups in the brainstem. Thus testosterone effects on neuroplasticity in the song system may be indirect in that behavioral activity stimulated by testosterone acting in sites that promote male sexual behavior could in turn promote morphological changes in the song system. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science (USA). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 17 (0 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailNeuroendocrinology of the thymus
Geenen, Vincent ULg; Robert, Françoise; Defresne, Marie-Paule ULg et al

in Hormone Research (1989), 31(1-2), 81-84

The neuropeptides oxytocin (OT) and vasopressin (VP) are synthesized in the human thymus in a similar way as in the hypothalamo-neurophypophyseal system. Immunocytochemistry with polyclonal and monoclonal ... [more ▼]

The neuropeptides oxytocin (OT) and vasopressin (VP) are synthesized in the human thymus in a similar way as in the hypothalamo-neurophypophyseal system. Immunocytochemistry with polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies revealed that immunoreactive OT- and VP-producing cells are localized in the subcapsular cortex and medulla of human and murine thymuses. The epithelial nature of the neuroendocrine thymic cells is demonstrated by their immunostaining with a monoclonal antibody against cytokeratin. An original example of a neuroendocrine-immune microenvironment is given by the thymic nurse cells which are composed of a large neuroendocrine epithelial cell enclosing numerous mitotic immature thymocytes. These observations and the previously reported mitogenic and immunomodulatory properties of VP and OT upon mature T cells and thymocytes strongly support the existence of a neuroendocrine thymo-lymphoid axis and an active role of thymic VP and OT in T cell differentiation and activation. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 12 (1 ULg)
See detailNeuroendocrinology of the thymus
Geenen, Vincent ULg; Robert, Françoise; Martens, Henri ULg et al

in Geenen, Vincent; Maggi, Mario (Eds.) Horizons in Endocrinology, Volume 2 (1991)

Detailed reference viewed: 14 (5 ULg)
See detailNeuroendocrinology of the thymus
Geenen, Vincent ULg

Conference given outside the academic context (1988)

Detailed reference viewed: 5 (0 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailNeuroendocrinology of the thymus
Geenen, Vincent ULg

Conference (1989, April)

Detailed reference viewed: 4 (0 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailNeuroendocrinology of the thymus
Geenen, Vincent ULg; Legros, Jean-Jacques ULg; Franchimont, Paul

Conference (1987, June 22)

Detailed reference viewed: 4 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailNeuroestrogens Rapidly Regulate Sexual Motivation But Not Performance
Seredynski, Aurore ULg; Balthazart, Jacques ULg; Christophe, Virginie et al

in Journal of Neuroscience (2013), 33(1), 164-174

Estrogens exert pleiotropic effects on reproductive traits, which include differentiation and activation of reproductive behaviors and the control of the secretion of gonadotropins. Estrogens also ... [more ▼]

Estrogens exert pleiotropic effects on reproductive traits, which include differentiation and activation of reproductive behaviors and the control of the secretion of gonadotropins. Estrogens also profoundly affect non-reproductive traits, such as cognition and neuroprotection. These effects are usually attributed to nuclear receptor binding and subsequent regulation of target gene transcription. Estrogens also affect neuronal activity and cell-signaling pathways via faster, membrane-initiated events. How these two types of actions that operate in distinct timescales interact in the control of complex behavioral responses is poorly understood. Here, we show that the central administration of estradiol rapidly increases the expression of sexual motivation, as assessed by several measures of sexual motivation produced in response to the visual presentation of a female but not sexual performance in male Japanese quail. This effect is mimicked by membrane-impermeable analogs of estradiol, indicating that it is initiated at the cell membrane. Conversely, blocking the action of estrogens or their synthesis by a single intracerebroventricular injection of estrogen receptor antagonists or aromatase inhibitors, respectively, decreases sexual motivation within minutes without affecting performance. The same steroid has thus evolved complementary mechanisms to regulate different behavioral components (motivation vs performance) in distinct temporal domains (long- vs short-term) so that diverse reproductive activities can be properly coordinated to improve reproductive fitness. Given the pleiotropic effects exerted by estrogens, other responses controlled by these steroids might also depend on a slow genomic regulation of neuronal plasticity underlying behavioral activation and an acute control of motivation to engage in behavior. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 53 (17 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailNeurofibromatose de type 1
Hermanns-Le, Trinh ULg; Devillers, Céline ULg; Franchimont, Claudine ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2009), 64

Detailed reference viewed: 72 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLa neurogenese adulte ou l'histoire d'un dogme qui s'ecroule.
Pirotte, Dorothée ULg; Rogister, Bernard ULg

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2008), 63(5-6), 245-50

The history of sciences is characterized by major discoveries, but also by challenges of theories or dogma previously established and accepted by everybody. One of the recent examples illustrating such a ... [more ▼]

The history of sciences is characterized by major discoveries, but also by challenges of theories or dogma previously established and accepted by everybody. One of the recent examples illustrating such a questioning relates to the demonstration of the persistence of a cerebral neurogenesis in the adult brain, including in human. This adult neurogenesis is however limited, both in space (it concerns only the subventricular zone and the gyrus dentatus in the hippocampus) and the type of newly-formed neurons (interneurones which most of them are GABAergic and present respectively in the olfactive bulb and CA1 area of the hippocampus). Moreover, this neurogenesis does not seem to be recruited after a brain lesion, a situation which explains why functional recovery when it is observed remains a consequence of brain plasticity. We thus legitimately address the question about the physiological role of this adult brain neurogenesis as well as a possible implication in the aetiology of various neurological disorders, like the neurodegenerative diseases or epilepsy, but also in psychiatric diseases like depression. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 692 (20 ULg)