Browsing
     by title


0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

or enter first few letters:   
OK
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailAromatic Side-Chain Interactions In Proteins. Near- And Far-Sequence His-X Pairs
Meurisse, R.; Brasseur, Robert ULg; Thomas, Annick ULg

in Biochimica et Biophysica Acta-Proteins and Proteomics (2003), 1649(1), 85-96

Several studies have analysed aromatic interactions, involving mostly phenylalanine, tyrosine and tryptophan. Only a few studies have considered histidine as an interacting aromatic residue. An extensive ... [more ▼]

Several studies have analysed aromatic interactions, involving mostly phenylalanine, tyrosine and tryptophan. Only a few studies have considered histidine as an interacting aromatic residue. An extensive analysis of aromatic His-X interactions is performed here on a data set of 593 PDB structures: 68% of the histidine are involved in aromatic pairs and 1271 non-redundant His-X pairs were analysed. Thirty percent of these pairs involve an aromatic partner less than 6 apart in the sequence. These near-sequence pairs correspond to conformations which stabilise secondary structures, mainly alpha-helices when the residues are 4 apart and beta-strands when they are 2 apart in the sequence. The partners of the other His-X pairs (887, 70%) are more than 5 apart in the sequence. Of these far-sequence pairs, 35% bridge beta strands and only 9% helices. The near-sequence pairs are sterically constrained as supported by conformer distribution. The X partners of far-sequence His-X pairs are mainly "above" the histidine ring with tilted and normal rings, corresponding to a "T shape; face to edge" orientation. Phenylalanine, the only aromatic residue with no heteroatom, is a disfavoured partner, whereas histidine is the preferred one. Heteroatom-heteroatom interactions are favoured in near-sequence as well as in far-sequence His-His, His-Trp and His-Tyr pairs. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 8 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailAromatic Side-Chain Interactions In Proteins: Near- And Far-Sequence Tyr-X Pairs
Meurisse, R.; Brasseur, Robert ULg; Thomas, Annick ULg

in Proteins-Structure Function and Genetics (2004), 54(3), 478-90

In the present study, an extensive analysis of the aromatic Tyr-X interactions is performed on a data set of 593 PDB structures, X being Phe, His, Tyr, and Trp. The nonredundant Tyr-X pairs (2645) were ... [more ▼]

In the present study, an extensive analysis of the aromatic Tyr-X interactions is performed on a data set of 593 PDB structures, X being Phe, His, Tyr, and Trp. The nonredundant Tyr-X pairs (2645) were retained and separated by both the residue distance in the sequence and the secondary structures they bridge. Similar to the Phe-X and His-X pairs, the far-sequence Tyr-X pairs (X partner > five apart in the sequence: 74%) show comparable secondary structures and conformers for either type of X partner, in contrast with the near-sequence Tyr-X pairs (26%). As the Phe-X pairs, the near-sequence Tyr-X pairs stabilize secondary structures, mainly the alpha- helices (positions 1, 3, and 4) and the beta-strands (position 2). Like the Phe-X and His-X pairs, most far-sequence Tyr-X pairs (34%) bridge beta-strands and only 11% bridge helices. As for the Phe-X and the His-X pairs, the X partners of the far-sequence Tyr-X pairs are frequently "above" the tyrosine ring with tilted and normal rings, whereas the X partner of the near-sequence Tyr-X pairs gradually moves from the "aside" to the "above" location, together with a progressive decrease of normal and increase of parallel rings, respectively. Unlike the His-X pairs, the interactions of the hetroatom in Tyr-X pairs are only favored with a sequence position +4 and over, owing to the spatial accessibility of the heteroatom. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 2 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailAromatization of androgens into estrogens reduces response latency to a noxious thermal stimulus in male quail
Evrard, H. C.; Balthazart, Jacques ULg

in Hormones & Behavior (2004), 45(3), 181-189

We recently demonstrated the presence of estrogen synthase (aromatase) and of estrogen receptors in the dorsal horn (laminae I-II) throughout the rostrocaudal extent of the spinal cord in male and female ... [more ▼]

We recently demonstrated the presence of estrogen synthase (aromatase) and of estrogen receptors in the dorsal horn (laminae I-II) throughout the rostrocaudal extent of the spinal cord in male and female Japanese quail. The spinal laminae I-II receive and process abundant sensory information elicited, among others, by acute noxious stimulation of the skin and resulting in rapid, reflex-like withdrawal behavior. In the present study, we demonstrate that systemic treatment with estradiol or testosterone markedly decreases the latency of the foot withdrawal in the hot water test. A simultaneous treatment with an aromatase inhibitor blocks the effects of testosterone demonstrating, hence, that they are mediated by a conversion of testosterone into an estrogen by aromatase. Furthermore, the testosterone- or estradiol-induced decrease in foot withdrawal latency is blocked by a treatment with the estradiol receptor antagonist, tamoxifen, indicating that the effects are largely mediated by the interaction of estradiol with estrogen receptors. Together, these data suggest that sex steroids modulate sensitivity to noxious stimuli possibly by a direct action at the level of the dorsal hom of the spinal cord. (C) 2004 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 14 (0 ULg)
Full Text
See detailAround Robert Wyatt
Delville, Michel ULg

Article for general public (2009)

Detailed reference viewed: 23 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailAROUSAL, EXPERIENCES, AND PSYCHO-EMOTIONAL MANAGEMENT OF THE NORMS’ CONFLICTS IN AFRICAN POSTCOLONIAL CONTEXT: CASE STUDY OF THE SUCCESSION PRACTICE IN CAMEROON
Bomda, Joseph ULg

Poster (2011, October)

More than a half-century after its independence, Cameroonians, like other African people, are experiencing many conflicts of norms in their succession practices. Among other conflicts, one can mention: 1 ... [more ▼]

More than a half-century after its independence, Cameroonians, like other African people, are experiencing many conflicts of norms in their succession practices. Among other conflicts, one can mention: 1. “Residual” or Interreligious conflict between Christians, Muslims, and Animists. 2. “Virtual” conflicts between Anglophone and Francophone people. 3. But the main source of conflicts is the “Ordinary” or Interpersonal conflicts between ancestral and modern laws (of French or English inspiration), because both are legally accepted. SEEING THE CONFLICTS BETWEEN ANCESTRAL AND MODERN LEGAL NORMS RELATED TO SUCCESSION, 1. What do the victims of such conflicts experience from psycho-emotional point of view? 2. How do they manage these experiences of conflicts? 3. In which way can these experiences and their management contribute to the debates on social psychology? [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 14 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detail"Arrachez-moi ce coeur!": de la crainte du rejet au délire après transplantation cardiaque
Triffaux, Jean-Marc ULg; Demoulin, J. C.; Limet, Raymond ULg

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2002), 57(6), 389-92

Detailed reference viewed: 21 (6 ULg)
Full Text
See detailArrangement au présent, compromis au futur. Les ‘cadres de l’expérience’ d’un groupe de jeunes garçons dans le contexte tunisien
Nachi, Mohamed ULg

in Briviglierie et Cicchelli, Marc et Vincenzo (Ed.) Adolescences méditerranéennes. L’espace public à petits pas (2007)

Enquête pour suivre les expériences d’un groupe de jeunes en Tunisie et analyser la manière dont ils s'arrandent entre-eux, se mattent d'accord, nouer des compromis pour pouvoir vivre en commun

Detailed reference viewed: 16 (1 ULg)
See detailArrangement au présent, compromis au futur. Les ‘cadres de l’expérience’ d’un groupe de jeunes garçons dans le contexte tunisien
Nachi, Mohamed ULg

in BREVIGLIERI et CICCHELLI, Marc et Vincenzo (Ed.) Adolescences méditerranéennes. L’espace public à petits pas (2007)

Detailed reference viewed: 24 (1 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailArray Interpolation Applied to Conformal Array STAP
Ries, Philippe; Lapierre, Fabian D.; Verly, Jacques ULg

Conference (2005)

Detailed reference viewed: 8 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailArray of microsystem for live monitoring of high voltage power lines
Renson, Luc ULg; Jamar, Claude ULg; Guérard, Suzanne ULg et al

in Proceedings of the 1st IOMAC (2005, April)

How to use microsystems placed on power lines environment.

Detailed reference viewed: 124 (15 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailArray-CGH analysis in Rwandan patients presenting development delay/intellectual disability with multiple congenital anomalies.
Uwineza, Annette; CABERG, Jean-Hubert ULg; Hitayezu, Janvier et al

in BMC medical genetics (2014), 15(1), 79

BACKGROUND: Array-CGH is considered as the first-tier investigation used to identify copy number variations. Right now, there is no available data about the genetic etiology of patients with development ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Array-CGH is considered as the first-tier investigation used to identify copy number variations. Right now, there is no available data about the genetic etiology of patients with development delay/intellectual disability and congenital malformation in East Africa. METHODS: Array comparative genomic hybridization was performed in 50 Rwandan patients with development delay/intellectual disability and multiple congenital abnormalities, using the Agilent's 180 K microarray platform. RESULTS: Fourteen patients (28%) had a global development delay whereas 36 (72%) patients presented intellectual disability. All patients presented multiple congenital abnormalities. Clinically significant copy number variations were found in 13 patients (26%). Size of CNVs ranged from 0,9 Mb to 34 Mb. Six patients had CNVs associated with known syndromes, whereas 7 patients presented rare genomic imbalances. CONCLUSION: This study showed that CNVs are present in African population and show the importance to implement genetic testing in East-African countries. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 8 (3 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailArray-CGH analysis of T-ALL patients and cell lines
Lahortiga, I.; Graux, C.; Mentens, N. et al

in Blood (2006, November 16), 108(11, Part 2), 195-196

Detailed reference viewed: 36 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailArrest of apoptosis in auditory neurons: Implications for sensorineural preservation in cochlear implantation
Scarpidis, U.; Madnani, D.; Shoemaker, C. et al

in Otology & Neurotology (2003), 24(3), 409-417

Hypothesis: The JNK/c-Jun cell death pathway is a major pathway responsible for the loss of oxidative stress-damaged auditory neurons. Background: Implantation of patients with residual hearing ... [more ▼]

Hypothesis: The JNK/c-Jun cell death pathway is a major pathway responsible for the loss of oxidative stress-damaged auditory neurons. Background: Implantation of patients with residual hearing accentuates the need to preserve functioning sensorineural elements. Although some auditory function may survive electrode insertion, the probability of initiating an ongoing loss of auditory neurons and hair cells is unknown. Cochlear implantation can potentially generate oxidative stress, which can initiate the cell death of both auditory neurons and hair cells. Methods: Dissociated cell cultures of P4 rat auditory neurons identified the apoptotic pathway initiated by oxidative stress insults (e.g., loss of trophic factor support) and characterized this pathway by arresting translation of pathway-specific mRNA with antisense oligonucleotide treatment and with the use of pathway specific inhibitors. The presence or absence of apoptosis-specific protein and changes in the level of neuronal survival measured the efficacy of these interventional strategies. Results: These in vitro studies identified the JNK/c-Jun cascade as a major initiator of apoptosis of auditory neurons in response to oxidative stress. Neurons pretreated with c-jun antisense oligonucleotide and exposed to high levels of oxidative stress were rescued from apoptosis, whereas neurons in treatment control cultures died. Treatment of oxidative-stressed cultures with either curcumin, a MAPKKK pathway inhibitor, or PD-098059, a MEK1 inhibitor, blocked loss of neurons via the JNK/c-Jun apoptotic pathway. Conclusion: Blocking the JNK/c-Jun cell death pathway is a feasible approach to treating oxidative stress-induced apoptosis within the cochlea and may have application as an otoprotective strategy during cochlear implantation. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 14 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailArrest of MCF-7 cell migration by laminin in vitro: possible mechanisms.
Coopman, P.; Verhasselt, B.; Bracke, M. et al

in Clinical & Experimental Metastasis (1991), 9(5), 469-84

Laminin, a major basement membrane component, arrested the migration of MCF-7/AZ human breast adenocarcinoma cells that were not invasive in vitro. Migration of invasive MCF-7/6 cells was not affected by ... [more ▼]

Laminin, a major basement membrane component, arrested the migration of MCF-7/AZ human breast adenocarcinoma cells that were not invasive in vitro. Migration of invasive MCF-7/6 cells was not affected by laminin. Both cell types expressed the 67 kD laminin receptor, at both mRNA and protein level, but did not express the alpha 6 subunit of the VLA-6 integrin-type laminin receptor. The presence of YIGSR peptides (100 micrograms/ml), reported to block the interaction between laminin and its 67 kD receptor, did not change the migratory response of MCF-7/AZ or MCF-7/6 cells when meeting laminin lanes. In addition, the migration of these cell types was not affected by the presence of 17-beta-estradiol (10(-6) M) or all-trans retinoic acid (10(-6) M), which were both reported to increase the number of 67 kD receptors. We could therefore not assign an involvement of the 67 kD receptors in migration of MCF-7 cells on laminin, nor did we find evidence that conditioned medium of MCF-7/6 cells contains factors that are able to initiate migration of MCF-7/AZ cells on laminin. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 19 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailArrêt "Commission c. Autriche" : la lutte contre la pollution aux prises avec la libre circulation des marchandises
Sibony, Anne-Lise ULg; Lieven, Sophie ULg

in Journal de Droit Européen [=JDE] (2012), (187), 80-82

Detailed reference viewed: 38 (6 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailArrêt "Slovensko": les exigences liées au débat contradictoire dans l'analyse des offres en droit des marchés publics
Durviaux, Ann-Lawrence ULg

in Journal de Droit Européen [=JDE] (2012), 7/2012(n°191), 218

Detailed reference viewed: 32 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailArrêt Cartesio : nouvelles précisions sur les modalités de transfert du siège social au regard de la liberté d'établissement
Pasteger, David ULg

in Journal des Tribunaux (2009), 41/2009

"En l'état actuel du droit communautaire, les articles 43 CE et 48 CE doivent être interprétés en ce sens qu'ils ne s'opposent pas à une réglementation d'un État membre qui empêche une société constituée ... [more ▼]

"En l'état actuel du droit communautaire, les articles 43 CE et 48 CE doivent être interprétés en ce sens qu'ils ne s'opposent pas à une réglementation d'un État membre qui empêche une société constituée en vertu du droit national de cet État membre de transférer son siège dans un autre État membre tout en gardant sa qualité de société relevant du droit national de l'État membre selon la législation duquel elle a été constituée" (C.J.C.E., 16 décembre 2008, aff. C-210/06, Cartesio). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 416 (8 ULg)
Full Text
See detailL'arrêt Cobelfret de la CJCE et ses conséquences sur le régime des RDT
Richelle, Isabelle ULg

in Tax Audit & Accountancy (2009)

Detailed reference viewed: 82 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailL'arrêt Copland ou l'espérance légitime du travailleur quant au caractère privé de ses communications
Kefer, Fabienne ULg; Cornelis, Sabine ULg

in Revue Trimestrielle des Droits de l'Homme (2009), 79

La subordination qui caractérise le contrat de travail ne permet pas à l’employeur de s’immiscer dans la vie privée de son travailleur par un contrôle de l’utilisation du téléphone, du courrier ... [more ▼]

La subordination qui caractérise le contrat de travail ne permet pas à l’employeur de s’immiscer dans la vie privée de son travailleur par un contrôle de l’utilisation du téléphone, du courrier électronique et de l’internet sur les lieux de travail, même lorsque ces outils sont destinés à des fins professionnelle, si le travailleur n’a pas été averti de la possibilité d’un contrôle et peut nourrir l’attente légitime que les informations relatives à ses communications ne soient pas relevées et stockées. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 185 (18 ULg)