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See detailNeural correlates of cognitive control at the item specific level in the Stroop task
Grandjean, Julien ULg; D'Ostilio, Kevin ULg; Fias, Wim et al

Poster (2010, May 04)

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See detailThe neural correlates of cognitive reserve in aging
Bastin, Christine ULg; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg et al

Scientific conference (2011)

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See detailNeural correlates of consciousness during general anesthesia using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI).
BONHOMME, Vincent ULg; Boveroux, Pierre; Brichant, Jean-François ULg et al

in Archives italiennes de biologie (2012), 150(2-3), 155-63

This paper reviews the current knowledge about the mechanisms of anesthesia-induced alteration of consciousness. It is now evident that hypnotic anesthetic agents have specific brain targets whose ... [more ▼]

This paper reviews the current knowledge about the mechanisms of anesthesia-induced alteration of consciousness. It is now evident that hypnotic anesthetic agents have specific brain targets whose function is hierarchically altered in a dose-dependent manner. Higher order networks, thought to be involved in mental content generation, as well as sub-cortical networks involved in thalamic activity regulation seems to be affected first by increasing concentrations of hypnotic agents that enhance inhibitory neurotransmission. Lower order sensory networks are preserved, including thalamo-cortical connectivity into those networks, even at concentrations that suppress responsiveness, but cross-modal sensory interactions are inhibited. Thalamo-cortical connectivity into the consciousness networks decreases with increasing concentrations of those agents, and is transformed into an anti-correlated activity between the thalamus and the cortex for the deepest levels of sedation, when the subject is non responsive. Future will tell us whether these brain function alterations are also observed with hypnotic agents that mainly inhibit excitatory neurotransmission. The link between the observations made using fMRI and the identified biochemical targets of hypnotic anesthetic agents still remains to be identified. [less ▲]

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See detailNeural correlates of controlled memory processes in questionable Alzheimer’s disease
Bastin, Christine ULg; Kerrouche, Nacer; LEKEU, Françoise ULg et al

in Ashford, J. Wesson; Rosen, Allyson; Adamson, Maheen (Eds.) et al Advances in Alzheimer's Disease. Volume 2: Handbook of imaging the Alzheimer brain (2011)

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterized by a progressive loss of controlled cognitive processes (processes requiring mental effort and attentional resources), and functional neuroimaging at early stages ... [more ▼]

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterized by a progressive loss of controlled cognitive processes (processes requiring mental effort and attentional resources), and functional neuroimaging at early stages of AD provides an opportunity to tease out the neural correlates of controlled processes. Controlled and automatic memory performance was assessed with the Process Dissociation Procedure in 50 patients diagnosed with questionable Alzheimer’s disease (QAD). The patients’ brain glucose metabolism was measured using FDG-PET. After a follow-up period of 36 months, 27 patients had converted to AD, while 23 remained stable. Both groups showed a similar decrease in controlled memory processes but preserved automatic processes at entry into the study, suggesting that impairment of controlled memory would not be specific for AD. Patients who subsequently converted to Alzheimer type dementia showed significantly decreased brain metabolism at baseline compared to stable QAD in associative cortices known to be involved in AD (the left precuneus, the right inferior parietal lobule and bilateral middle temporal cortex).Voxel-based cognitive and metabolic correlations showed that a decrease in controlled memory processes was preferentially correlated with lower activity in the dorsomedial prefrontal and posterior cingulate cortices in very early AD patients. The dorsomedial prefrontal cortex would play a role in controlled memory processes as they relate to reflective and monitoring processes, while the posterior cingulate cortex is involved in the controlled access to previously encoded episodes. In stable QAD patients, reduced controlled performance in verbal memory correlated with impaired activity in the left anterior hippocampal structure, which would alter the reactivation of associations created at encoding. [less ▲]

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See detailNeural correlates of counting of sequential sensory and motor events in the human brain.
Kansaku, Kenji; Johnson, Ari; Grillon, Marie-Laure et al

in NeuroImage (2006), 31(2), 649-60

Little is known about the ability to enumerate small numbers of successive stimuli and movements. It is possible that there exist neural substrates that are consistently recruited both to count sensory ... [more ▼]

Little is known about the ability to enumerate small numbers of successive stimuli and movements. It is possible that there exist neural substrates that are consistently recruited both to count sensory stimuli from different modalities and for counting movements executed by different effectors. Here, we identify a network of areas that was involved in enumerating small numbers of auditory, visual, and somatosensory stimuli, and in enumerating sequential movements of hands and feet, in the bilateral premotor cortex, presupplementary motor area, posterior temporal cortex, and thalamus. The most significant consistent activation across sensory and motor counting conditions was found in the lateral premotor cortex. Lateral premotor activation was not dependent on movement preparation, stimulus presentation timing, or number word verbalization. Movement counting, but not sensory counting, activated the anterior parietal cortex. This anterior parietal area may correspond to an area recruited for movement counting identified by recent single-neuron studies in monkeys. These results suggest that overlapping but not identical networks of areas are involved in counting sequences of sensory stimuli and sequences of movements in the human brain. [less ▲]

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See detailNeural Correlates of Envisioning Emotional Events in the near and Far Future
D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg; Xue, Gui; Lu, Zhong-Lin et al

in NeuroImage (2008), 40(1), 398-407

Being able to envision emotional events that might happen in the future has a clear adaptive value. This study addressed the functional neuroanatomy of this process and investigated whether it is ... [more ▼]

Being able to envision emotional events that might happen in the future has a clear adaptive value. This study addressed the functional neuroanatomy of this process and investigated whether it is modulated by temporal distance. Participants imagined positive and negative events pertaining to the near future or far future while their brain activity was measured with fMRI. The results demonstrate that the anterior part of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) was more active in envisioning emotional events in the far future than in the near future, whereas the caudate nucleus was engaged in envisioning emotional (especially positive) situations in the near future. We argue that the anterior part of the vmPFC might assign emotional values to mental representations of future events that pertain to long-term goals. On the other hand, the caudate might support more concrete simulations of action plans to achieve rewarding situations in the near future. [less ▲]

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See detailNeural correlates of fast and slow ocular sequence learning
Albouy, Geneviève ULg; Ruby, Perrine; Balteau, Evelyne ULg et al

in NeuroImage (2005), 26(Suppl. 1),

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See detailNEURAL CORRELATES OF GAIT HYPOKINESIA IN PARKINSON'S DISEASE: AN FMRI STUDY
Cremers, Julien ULg; Stamatakis, Julien; D'Ostilio, Kevin ULg et al

Poster (2012, May 05)

Introduction: Brisk walking (BW) is an efficient tool to study gait hypokinesia whose pathogenesis remains poorly understood in Parkinson's disease (PD). Aims: Assuming that brain regions recruited during ... [more ▼]

Introduction: Brisk walking (BW) is an efficient tool to study gait hypokinesia whose pathogenesis remains poorly understood in Parkinson's disease (PD). Aims: Assuming that brain regions recruited during imagined gait strongly overlap with those recruited during real gait, we used mental imagery of BW as a paradigm to study the neural correlates of gait hypokinesia in PD with BOLD fMRI. Methods: 15 'on-drugs' PD patients and 15 controls matched for age and gender were instructed to imagine themselves in two situations: comfortable walking (CW) and BW on a 25 meter-path. Imagined speed reserve (ISR), defined as the difference between imagined BW and CW speeds, was measured as a control of behavioral performance. The first-level individual contrast images representing the comparison between BW and CW were entered into second-level analyses with the corresponding ISRs as correlation regressors. Results: ISRs and their real counterparts measured offline were significantly decreased in patients relatively to controls. They strongly positively correlated in patients (Pearson's r = 0.88) and controls (Pearson's r = 0.59). Between-group comparison of individual contrasts BW minus CW in correlation with their corresponding ISRs showed that increasing imagined gait speed was strongly associated with increased activity of the left posterior parietal cortex (PPC) in controls and with decreased activity of this region in the patients. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that gait hypokinesia is related to an impaired function of the left PPC in PD. The left PPC may represent a target for therapeutic interventions aimed at alleviating gait disturbances in PD. [less ▲]

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See detailNeural Correlates of Human NREM Sleep Oscillations
Foret, Ariane ULg; Shaffii, Anahita ULg; Muto, Vincenzo ULg et al

in Hutt, Axel (Ed.) Sleep and Anesthesia (2011)

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See detailNeural Correlates of Human Sleep and Sleep-Dependent Memory Processing
Meyer, Christelle ULg; Muto, Vincenzo ULg; Jaspar, Mathieu ULg et al

in Frank, Marcos (Ed.) Sleep and Brain Activity (2012)

Wakefulness and sleep are associated with distinct patterns of neural activity and neuromodulation. In humans, functional neuroimaging was used to characterize the related changes in regional brain ... [more ▼]

Wakefulness and sleep are associated with distinct patterns of neural activity and neuromodulation. In humans, functional neuroimaging was used to characterize the related changes in regional brain metabolism and hemodynamics. Recent data combining EEG and fMRI described the transient responses associated with spindles and slow waves, as well as the changes in functional integration during NREM sleep. It was also shown that regional brain activity during sleep is influenced by the experience acquired during the preceding waking period. These data are currently interpreted in the framework of two theories. First, the use-dependent increase in slow oscillation during NREM sleep is associated with local synaptic homeostasis. Second, reactivations of memory traces during NREM sleep would reorganize declarative memories in hippocampal-neocortical networks, a systems-level memory consolidation which can be hindered by sleep deprivation. Collectively, these data reveal the dynamical changes in brain activity during sleep which support normal human cognition. [less ▲]

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See detailNeural correlates of hypokinetic gait in Parkinson’s disease: An fMRI study
Cremers, Julien ULg; Stamatakis, Julien; D'Ostilio, Kevin ULg et al

Poster (2012)

Objective: To investigate the neural correlates of hypokinetic gait in Parkinson’s disease (PD) using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Background: Although hypokinetic gait is frequent and ... [more ▼]

Objective: To investigate the neural correlates of hypokinetic gait in Parkinson’s disease (PD) using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Background: Although hypokinetic gait is frequent and has a negative impact on quality of life in PD, its underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Assuming that the brain regions recruited during real and imagined gait strongly overlap, mental imagery of brisk gait may be a successful approach to study hypokinetic gait in PD. Methods: Fifteen ‘‘on-drugs’’ PD patients (8 males; mean age 5 65.1 6 9.4 years) and fifteen controls matched for age, gender and mental imagery skills were trained to perform video-taped trials of comfortable and brisk gait on a 25 meter-path. The study was organ- ized as a block-design fMRI experiment where subjects were instructed to rehearse themselves performing comfortable and brisk gait and to press a key to indicate when they completed each 25 meter-imagined gait trial. The imagined speed reserve (ISR) defined as the difference between imagined brisk and comfortable gait speeds was measured as a control of behavioral performance. Imaging data processing and analyses were performed using SPM8. The first-level individual contrast images representing the comparison between brisk and comfortable gait were entered as two separate groups (controls vs patients) in an ANOVA with the corresponding ISRs as correlation regressors. Results: Compared with controls, patients showed hypokinetic gait during real gait training as their increase in speed during brisk relatively to comfortable gait was related to an increase in step ca- dence (r50.87; p<0.001) but not in step length (r50.11). ISRs meas- ured during fMRI and their real counterparts measured offline strongly correlated in patients (r50.88; p<0.001) and controls (r50.59; p50.02). Between-group comparison (p<0.001, uncorrected) of fMRI data showed that increasing imagined gait speed was strongly associated with increased activity of the left posterior parietal cortex in controls and with decreased activity of this region in patients. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that hypokinetic gait in PD is related to the impaired functioning of the left posterior parietal cortex. This area may represent a target for therapeutic interventions aimed at alleviating gait disturbances in PD. [less ▲]

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See detailNeural Correlates of Ongoing Conscious Experience: Both Task-Unrelatedness and Stimulus-Independence Are Related to Default Network Activity
Stawarczyk, David ULg; Majerus, Steve ULg; Maquet, Pierre ULg et al

in PLoS ONE (2011), 6(2), 16997

The default mode network (DMN) is a set of brain regions that consistently shows higher activity at rest compared to tasks requiring sustained focused attention toward externally presented stimuli. The ... [more ▼]

The default mode network (DMN) is a set of brain regions that consistently shows higher activity at rest compared to tasks requiring sustained focused attention toward externally presented stimuli. The cognitive processes that the DMN possibly underlies remain a matter of debate. It has alternately been proposed that DMN activity reflects unfocused attention toward external stimuli or the occurrence of internally generated thoughts. The present study aimed at clarifying this issue by investigating the neural correlates of the various kinds of conscious experiences that can occur during task performance. Four classes of conscious experiences (i.e., being fully focused on the task, distractions by irrelevant sensations/perceptions, interfering thoughts related to the appraisal of the task, and mind-wandering) that varied along two dimensions (“task-relatedness” and “stimulus-dependency”) were sampled using thought-probes while the participants performed a go/no-go task. Analyses performed on the intervals preceding each probe according to the reported subjective experience revealed that both dimensions are relevant to explain activity in several regions of the DMN, namely the medial prefrontal cortex, posterior cingulate cortex/precuneus, and posterior inferior parietal lobe. Notably, an additive effect of the two dimensions was demonstrated for midline DMN regions. On the other hand, lateral temporal regions (also part of the DMN) were specifically related to stimulus-independent reports. These results suggest that midline DMN regions underlie cognitive processes that are active during both internal thoughts and external unfocused attention. They also strengthen the view that the DMN can be fractionated into different subcomponents and reveal the necessity to consider both the stimulus-dependent and the task-related dimensions of conscious experiences when studying the possible functional roles of the DMN. [less ▲]

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See detailNeural Correlates of Performance Variabilty during Motor Sequence Acquisition
Albouy, Geneviève ULg; Sterpenich, V.; Vandewalle, Gilles ULg et al

in NeuroImage (2012), 60(1), 324-331

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See detailNeural correlates of personal goal processing when envisioning future events
D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg

Conference (2009, December 10)

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See detailThe Neural Correlates of Re-cancellation Behaviors in Unilateral Neglect: A Neuropsychological Approach
Wansard, Murielle ULg; Bastin, Christine ULg; Meulemans, Thierry ULg

Poster (2014, April)

The present study focused on re-cancellation behaviors in unilateral neglect (i.e., the tendency to search repeatedly items located on the right side in visual search tasks), and used a neuropsychological ... [more ▼]

The present study focused on re-cancellation behaviors in unilateral neglect (i.e., the tendency to search repeatedly items located on the right side in visual search tasks), and used a neuropsychological approach to identify the cerebral correlates of this deficit. Fourteen patients suffering from left neglect and 14 elderly age-matched controls performed a cancellation task without visual feedback. Neglect patients cancelled fewer targets than controls, and re-cancelled an abnormally high number of targets. Lesion maps were used to compare the location of brain damage in neglect patients with the highest versus the lowest percentage of re-cancellations. Anatomical data revealed that the right insula is commonly damaged in 5 out of 6 patients with the highest re-cancellation percentage, but is spared in the subgroup of patients with the lowest re-cancellation percentage. These results suggest that damage to the right insula may contribute to pathological visual search in spatial neglect, possibly by reducing interaction between the ventral and dorsal attention network (the latter being more directly involved in spatial processes). [less ▲]

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See detailThe neural correlates of recollection and familiarity during aging
Angel, Lucie; Bastin, Christine ULg; Genon, Sarah ULg et al

in Journal of Psychophysiology (2013), 27(Suppl 1), 48

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See detailThe neural correlates of recollection and familiarity during aging
Angel, Lucie; Bastin, Christine ULg; Genon, Sarah ULg et al

Poster (2013)

Detailed reference viewed: 31 (6 ULg)