Browsing
     by title


0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

or enter first few letters:   
OK
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHet Nederlandse literatuuronderwijs in de Waalse provincies als prescriptieve Landeskunde (1817-1900)
Steyaert, Kris ULg

in Konst, Jan; Hüning, Matthias; Holzhey, Tanja (Eds.) Neerlandistiek in Europa: Bijdragen tot de geschiedenis van de universitaire neerlandistiek buiten Nederland en Vlaanderen (2010)

This article focuses on three nineteenth-century literary histories written for French-speaking students of Dutch. The histories illustrate a concern on the part of the authors (J.F.X. Würth, F.A ... [more ▼]

This article focuses on three nineteenth-century literary histories written for French-speaking students of Dutch. The histories illustrate a concern on the part of the authors (J.F.X. Würth, F.A. Snellaert, and J. Stecher) not only with the teaching of Dutch literature and the development of a solid Dutch literary tradition but also with the presentation of their material in keeping with an underlying ideological framework. In each case their presentation was designed to reinforce a particular view of country and culture and of the respective roles of the Dutch, Flemish and Walloon peoples in the creation of a one-nation state. The differences between them reflect a change in the significance of Dutch literature as a result of political developments, leading in turn to a paradigm shift in the teaching of the subject at university. An analysis of the didactic aims and principles underlying the literary histories written by Würth, Snellaert and Stecher reveals the extent to which political allegiances and nationalist considerations determined their selection criteria and the organisation of their subject matter. Not surprisingly, the contemporary critical response to these study books shows a similar ideological bias. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 89 (10 ULg)
See detailNederlandse teksten I
Vromans, Joseph ULg; Theissen, Siegfried ULg

Book published by De Sikkel (1978)

Anthologie de textes non littéraires destinée aux classes supérieures de l'enseignement secondaire.

Detailed reference viewed: 10 (2 ULg)
See detailNederlandse teksten II
Vromans, Joseph ULg; Theissen, Siegfried ULg

Book published by De Sikkel (1978)

Anthologie de textes non littéraires destinée à l'enseignement universitaire

Detailed reference viewed: 22 (0 ULg)
See detailNederlandse uitspraakleer voor Franstaligen
Hiligsmann, Philippe; Rasier, Laurent ULg

Book published by Wolters-Plantyn (2006)

Detailed reference viewed: 46 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEen Nederlandstalige Shelley op de planken. De reconstructie van een vergeten schandaal
Steyaert, Kris ULg

in Neerlandica Extra Muros (2002), 40(3), 13-25

Detailed reference viewed: 10 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe need for a consensus in the use of assessment tools for Alzheimer's disease: The Feasibility Study (assessment tools for dementia in Alzheimer Centres across Europe), a European Alzheimer's Disease Consortium's (EADC) survey
Diaz, S. P. R.; Gregorio, P. G.; Casado, J. M. R. et al

in International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2005), 20(8), 744-748

Aims To ensure that all Alzheimer centres across Europe are capable of using a similar method of data collection. Information about the patient assessment tools used by each participating centre was ... [more ▼]

Aims To ensure that all Alzheimer centres across Europe are capable of using a similar method of data collection. Information about the patient assessment tools used by each participating centre was obtained and normal clinical practice in each EADC centre was documented by collecting data from routine new patient consultation. Methods Twenty new consecutive patients with objective memory impairment were recruited in each Alzheimer centre over 6 months. Each patient consultation was carried out according to routine clinical practice. Patient data were recorded using the anonymous patient protocol (demographic, diagnosis, MMSE score, patient assessment scales, and most prominent behavioural problem). Information about neuropsychological assessment tools used in each centre was take to account to harmonise research practice for future multicentre collaboration. Results Seven hundred and four patients from 36 memory clinics in 13 countries across Europe participated in the study. [M:F ratio 0.67. Mean age 75.4 SD 9.3 (51-102) Mean MMSE 21 SD 6 (0-30)] Five hundred and fifty-five patients had a clinical diagnosis of dementia [Alzheimer's disease (68.5%), vascular dementia (10.3%), frontal lobe dementia (5.6%), Lewy body dementia (4.1%), mixed dementia (5.6%)]. Duration of symptoms: 0-6 months 6.5%; 6-12 months 16.1%; 1-2 years 30.5%; 2-5 years 46.9%. Assessment scales used: Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) 48.9%, Reisberg's Global Deterioration Scale (GDS) 38.6%, ADL/IADL (Lawton and Brody, 1969) 37.5%, Neuropsychological Inventory (NPI) 28.6%, Geriatric Depression Scale 22%, ADL (Katz et al., 1963) 19.2%, ADAS-Cog 14.9%, Cornell Scale for Depression 12.9%, Grober and Bushke Selective Reminding Test 11.5%, ADCS/ADL 7.7%. 64.8% of the patients experienced behavioural symptoms: apathy 13.6%; anxiety 12.8%; dysphoria 9.9%; irritability 7.8%; agitation 5.5%; hallucinations 3.6%; delusions 3.6%, sleep disorder 2.4%; desinhibition 2%. Conclusions The most common type of cognitive decline was Alzheimer's disease followed by mild cognitive impairment and vascular dementia. CDR, GDS Reisberg, and ADL/IADL were used widely (40-50%). The NPI, geriatric depression scale and ADL (Katz, 1963) were only used in 20% of the centres. We verified large differences in the tools use in the EADC centres to evaluate patients with dementia across Europe. There is a need for a consensus in the use of assessment tools for dementia in Alzheimer's centres in Europe. Copyright (c) 2005 John Wiley [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 23 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe need for a transparent, ethical, and successful relationship between academic scientists and the pharmaceutical industry: a view of the Group for the Respect of Ethics and Excellence in Science (GREES).
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Kanis, J. A.; Ibar-Abadie, M*-E et al

in Osteoporosis International (2010), 21(5), 713-22

This paper provides recommendations for fair and unbiased relationship between academic scientists and the pharmaceutical industry. INTRODUCTION: Real or perceived problems in the relationship between ... [more ▼]

This paper provides recommendations for fair and unbiased relationship between academic scientists and the pharmaceutical industry. INTRODUCTION: Real or perceived problems in the relationship between academics and the industry have been the subject of much recent debate. It has been suggested that academic clinicians should sever all links with the industry-a view that is rarely challenged. METHODS: Academic experts and members of the pharmaceutical industry were invited to an expert consensus meeting to debate this topic. This meeting was organized by the Group for the Respect of Ethics and Excellence in Science. Conflict of interest, competing interest, right and duties of academic scientist, authorship, and staff and student education were discussed. RESULTS: Guidelines for a transparent, ethical, strong, and successful partnership between the academic scientist and the pharmaceutical industry have been provided. CONCLUSIONS: The Group support interactions between the industry and clinicians provided that it is transparent and ethical. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 24 (9 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe need for clinical guidance in the use of calcium and vitamin D in the management of osteoporosis: a consensus report
Boonen, S.; Rizzoli, R.; Meunier, P. J. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2004), 15(7), 511-519

A European Union (EU) directive on vitamins and minerals used as ingredients of food supplements with a nutritional or physiological effect (2002/46/EC) was introduced in 2003. Its implications for the ... [more ▼]

A European Union (EU) directive on vitamins and minerals used as ingredients of food supplements with a nutritional or physiological effect (2002/46/EC) was introduced in 2003. Its implications for the use of oral supplements of calcium and vitamin D in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis were discussed at a meeting organized with the help of the World Health Organization ( WHO) Collaborating Center for Public Health Aspects of Rheumatic Diseases (Liege, Belgium) and the support of the WHO Collaborating Center for Osteoporosis Prevention (Geneva, Switzerland). The following issues were addressed: Is osteoporosis a physiological or a medical condition? What is the evidence for the efficacy of calcium and vitamin D in the management of postmenopausal osteoporosis? What are the risks of self-management by patients in osteoporosis? From their discussions, the panel concluded that: (1) osteoporosis is a disease that requires continuing medical attention to ensure optimal therapeutic benefits; (2) when given in appropriate doses, calcium and vitamin D have been shown to be pharmacologically active (particularly in patients with dietary deficiencies), safe, and effective for the prevention and treatment of osteoporotic fractures; (3) calcium and vitamin D are an essential, but not sufficient, component of an integrated management strategy for the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis in patients with dietary insufficiencies, although maximal benefit in terms of fracture prevention requires the addition of antiresorptive therapy; (4) calcium and vitamin D are a cost-effective medication in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis; (5) it is apparent that awareness of the efficacy of calcium and vitamin D in osteoporosis is still low and further work needs to be done to increase awareness among physicians, patients, and women at risk; and (6) in order that calcium and vitamin D continues to be manufactured to Good Manufacturing Practice standards and physicians and other health care professionals continue to provide guidance for the optimal use of these agents, they should continue to be classified as medicinal products. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 11 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe need for economic evaluation in osteoarthritis
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg

in Aging Health (2009), 5(5), 591-594

Detailed reference viewed: 37 (7 ULg)
Full Text
See detailThe need for harmonized estimates of forest biodiversity indicators
Winter, Susanne; McRoberts, Ronald E.; Chirici, Gherardo et al

in Chirici, Gherardo; Winter, Susanne; McRoberts, Ronald E. (Eds.) National Forest Inventories - contributions to Forest Biodiversity Assessments (2011)

The investigations of Working Group 3 of COST Action E43 focused on assessing the ability of NFI's to report harmonized estimates of forest biodiversity indicators using NFI data. Four related factors ... [more ▼]

The investigations of Working Group 3 of COST Action E43 focused on assessing the ability of NFI's to report harmonized estimates of forest biodiversity indicators using NFI data. Four related factors motivated the investigations. Firstly, the importance of forest biodiversity for the economic, environmental, and social well-being of earth's civilizations is gaining wide international acceptance. Secondly, this acceptance has led to numerous international forest sustainability and biodiversity agreements that require periodic reports of estimates of indicators. Thirdly, the ability to report comparable estimates is impeded by the variety of sampling designs, plot configurations, selected variables, and measurement protocols used by the NFIs of different countries. Fourthly, the features of individual NFIs have evolved in response to unique ecological, economic, topographic, and climatic characteristics, and desire of the individual countries to retain the features. The general conclusion of these motivating factors is that apart from substantial standardization of NFIs, the best method for facilitating comparable reporting is to develop harmonization methods. Working Group 3 undertook a four-phase approach to developing methods for harmonizing estimates of biodiversity indicators using NFI data. The first phase entailed evaluating the importance of biodiversity variables and the feasibility of assessing them using NFI data. The conclusion of this phase was the selection of 17 biodiversity variables that were both important and feasible, grouping of them into seven essential features, and construction of common reference definitions for the variables. The second phase entailed evaluation of the agreement among NFIs with respect to the common definitions and measurement practices. The third phase entailed development of bridges (Stahl et al submitted) for converting estimates of forest biodiversity indicators obtained using national definitions to estimates consistent with the reference definitions. The fourth phase entailed construction of a common database of NFI data contributed by NFIs participating in COST Action E43 and testing of reference definitions and bridges developed by Working Group 3. The following chapters provide details and specific results for the four phases. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 46 (8 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailNeed for high-standard translation methodology for the dissemination of guidelines.
Henrotin, Yves ULg

in Osteoarthritis and Cartilage (2009), 17(12), 1536-8

Detailed reference viewed: 21 (4 ULg)
See detailThe need of a QC/QA system in waste landfills projects
Courard, Luc ULg

in Encyclopedia of Environmental Control Technology. Volume IX (1995)

Detailed reference viewed: 29 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLe neem et la lutte integree.
Schiffers, Bruno ULg

in Echos du COTA (1999), 84

L'agriculture est prise dans un cycle toujours plus contraignant d'intensification qui se fait au détriment de la qualité des produits et de l'environnement. Une solution partielle à ces dérives: utiliser ... [more ▼]

L'agriculture est prise dans un cycle toujours plus contraignant d'intensification qui se fait au détriment de la qualité des produits et de l'environnement. Une solution partielle à ces dérives: utiliser des plantes pour la protection des cultures. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 20 (9 ULg)
See detailNéerlandais / Presse radio
Yans, Baudoin ULg; Engelen, Nicole ULg; Nachtergaele, Lutgarde

Book published by De Boeck Université (2010)

Detailed reference viewed: 33 (1 ULg)
See detailNéerlandais intermédiaire et avancé - presse écrite
Hiligsmann, Philippe; Neven, Anneke; Rasier, Laurent ULg et al

Book published by De Boeck (2010)

Detailed reference viewed: 45 (0 ULg)
See detailNéerlandais Presse Radio
Nachtergaele, Lutgarde ULg; Yans, Baudoin ULg; Engelen, Nicole ULg

Book published by De Boeck Université (2010)

method to improve the listening comprehension for the Dutch language (advanced level) - methode om de luistervaardigheid te verbeteren (de methode is gebaseerd op uitzendingen van de Vlaamse en ... [more ▼]

method to improve the listening comprehension for the Dutch language (advanced level) - methode om de luistervaardigheid te verbeteren (de methode is gebaseerd op uitzendingen van de Vlaamse en Nederlandse radio) [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 42 (12 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailLa négation bn ... iwnA en néo-égyptien
Winand, Jean ULg

in Lingua Aegyptia [= LingAeg] (1996), 5

Detailed reference viewed: 32 (6 ULg)