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Peer Reviewed
See detailMolecular phylogeny of symbiotic pearlfishes
Lanterbcq, D; Parmentier, Eric ULg; Todesco, Maïté et al

Poster (2009)

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See detailMolecular phylogeny of the Cricetinae subfamily based on the mitochondrial cytochrome b and 12S rRNA genes and the nuclear vWF gene
Neumann, K.; Michaux, Johan ULg; Lebedev, V. et al

in Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution (2006), 39(1), 135-148

Despite some popularity of hamsters as pets and laboratory animals there is no reliable phylogeny of the subfamily Cricetinae available so far. Contradicting views exist not only about the actual number ... [more ▼]

Despite some popularity of hamsters as pets and laboratory animals there is no reliable phylogeny of the subfamily Cricetinae available so far. Contradicting views exist not only about the actual number of species but also concerning the validity of several genera. We used partial DNA sequences of two mitochondrial (cytochrome b, 12S rRNA) and one partial nuclear gene (von Willebrand Factor exon 28) to provide a first gene tree of the Cricetinae based on 15 taxa comprising six genera: According to our data, Palaearctic hamsters fall into three distinct phylogenetic groups: Phodopits, Mesocricetus, and Cricetus-related species which evolved during the late Miocene about 7-12 MY ago. Surprisingly, the genus Phodopus, which was previously thought to have appeared during the Pleistocene, forms the oldest clade. The largest number of extant hamster genera is found in a group of Cricetus-related hamsters. The genus Cricetulus itself proved to be not truly monophyletic with Cricetulus migratorius appearing more closely related to Tscherskia, Cricetus, and Allocricetulus. We propose to place the species within a new monotypic genus. Molecular clock calculations are not always in line with the dating of fossil records. DNA based divergence time estimates as well as taxonomic relationships demand a reevaluation of morphological characters previously used to identify fossils and extant hamsters. (c) 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailMolecular phylogeography of the common dormouse, Muscardinus avellanarius, in Europe
Mouton, Alice ULg; Grill, Andrea; Krystufek, Boris et al

Conference (2009, September)

The common dormouse, Muscardinus avellanarius is naturally rare in Europe. Recently, natural scarcity has been exacerbated by anthropogenic environmental damages. This specie is now regarded as rare or ... [more ▼]

The common dormouse, Muscardinus avellanarius is naturally rare in Europe. Recently, natural scarcity has been exacerbated by anthropogenic environmental damages. This specie is now regarded as rare or endangered, attracting conservation related research and active habitat management to assist its survival. Furthermore, obligatory thermophilous species are probably more affected by cold phases than cold-tolerant organisms. The evolutionary history of the common dormouse would therefore show significant differences compared to other species. To better understand the genetic variation and structure of this species, we developed a phylogeographic study based on sequences of 700 base pairs of the mitochondrial DNA cytochrome b gene from 102 specimens collected throughout its palearctic distribution. The obtained dataset was analysed using different phylogenetic reconstruction as well as other methods adapted to phylogeography. The analysis of the mtDNA reveals a number of surprises. The results show two major genetic lineages: the first corresponding to the Western and Italian populations; the second comprising the Balkan and the Northern populations. Furthermore, the analyses tend to propose a scenario of multiple refugia in the Italian peninsula. This pattern of ‘refugia within-refugia’ has important implications in interpreting the distribution patterns of genetic diversity within the southern peninsulas. The Calabria region and Sicily could be “hot spots” of intraspecific biodiversity of Muscardinus avellanarius. These regions would thus deserve attention when deciding Evolutionary Significant Units (“ESU) for conservation of this species. [less ▲]

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See detailMolecular Polymorphisms in Tunisian Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) as Revealed by RAPD Fingerprints
Hasnaoui, Nejib ULg; Mars, Messaoud; Chibani, Jemni et al

in Diversity (2010), 2(1), 107-114

The genetic diversity among Tunisian pomegranate cultivars has been investigated. Using universal primers, the random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) method was used to generate banding profiles from a ... [more ▼]

The genetic diversity among Tunisian pomegranate cultivars has been investigated. Using universal primers, the random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) method was used to generate banding profiles from a set of twelve cultivars. Data was then computed with appropriate programs to construct a dendrogram illustrating the relationships between the studied cultivars. Our data proved the efficiency of the designed method to examine the DNA polymorphism in this crop since the tested primers are characterized by a collective resolving power of 12.83. In addition, the cluster analysis has exhibited a parsimonious tree branching independent from the geographic origin of the cultivars. In spite of the relatively low number of primers and cultivars, RAPD constitutes an appropriate procedure to assess the genetic diversity and to survey the phylogenetic relationships in this crop. [less ▲]

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See detailMolecular profiling of 16K PRL treated tumours by an antibody-array approach
Cornet, Anne ULg; Nguyen, Ngoc-Quynh-Nhu ULg; Lion, Michelle ULg et al

Poster (2006, May)

Tumour development is often accompanied by the formation of new blood vessels from existing vasculature. This new intratumoral blood network is driven by the process of angiogenesis, providing the ... [more ▼]

Tumour development is often accompanied by the formation of new blood vessels from existing vasculature. This new intratumoral blood network is driven by the process of angiogenesis, providing the essential nutrients for growth, invasion and metastasis. At the present time, it is well established that inhibitors of angiogenesis prevent the growth and progression of tumours, offering a new therapeutic approach for treatment of cancer. Several studies have already showed that the N-terminal fragment of the human prolactin, 16k-Da PRL, has a potent anti-angiogenic activity. Recently, research groups have demonstrated that the 16k-Da PRL inhibits tumour development in animal models. Despite the fact that several studies leading to improve our knowledge of 16k-Da PRL action were performed, little is known about its role played to prevent tumour growth in vivo. In this study, we first tested the ability of the 16k-Da PRL to inhibit the growth of established HCT116 tumours in nude mice, using an adenovirus approach. As expected, we found that the tumour progression was tightly reduced by the expression of the 16k-Da PRL into the tumours. This antitumour activity was also associated with a slight tumour vascularization. To discover biomarkers that contribute in 16k-Da PRL tumour suppressive effects, we used one of the most powerful multiplexed detection techonologies: the antibody-microarray proposed by Eurogentec. These protein-chips allow to identify multiple proteins from small amounts of samples within a single experiment. Three independent sets of antibody array from samples of 16k-Da PRL treated tumours and controls were analysed. Experimental and analysis optimisations were applied to ensure the correct interpretation of the fluorescent signals from the antibody arrays. In addition, significant results were confirmed by Western blot analysis. Our study allowed to identify several proteins which could be implicated in the tumour dormancy induced by 16k-Da PRL treatment. Additional analysis will provide important biological information for discovering of the new cancer biomarkers and their relationship with the 16k-Da PRL effects on cancer development. [less ▲]

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See detailMolecular properties of cinchona alkaloids: a theoretical approach
Oleksyn, Barbara; Suszko-Purzycka, Alina; Dive, Georges ULg et al

in Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences (1992), 81(2), 122-127

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See detailMolecular Reclassification of Crohn's Disease by Cluster Analysis of Genetic Variants
Cleynen, Isabelle; Mahachie John, Jestinah ULg; Henckaerts, Liesbet et al

in PLoS ONE (2010), 5(9), 12952

<sec> <title>Background</title> <p>Crohn's Disease (CD) has a heterogeneous presentation, and is typically classified according to extent and location of disease. The genetic susceptibility to CD is well ... [more ▼]

<sec> <title>Background</title> <p>Crohn's Disease (CD) has a heterogeneous presentation, and is typically classified according to extent and location of disease. The genetic susceptibility to CD is well known and genome-wide association scans (GWAS) and meta-analysis thereof have identified over 30 susceptibility loci. Except for the association between ileal CD and <italic>NOD2</italic> mutations, efforts in trying to link CD genetics to clinical subphenotypes have not been very successful. We hypothesized that the large number of confirmed genetic variants enables (better) classification of CD patients.</p> </sec><sec> <title>Methodology/Principal Findings</title> <p>To look for genetic-based subgroups, genotyping results of 46 SNPs identified from CD GWAS were analyzed by Latent Class Analysis (LCA) in CD patients and in healthy controls. Six genetic-based subgroups were identified in CD patients, which were significantly different from the five subgroups found in healthy controls. The identified CD-specific clusters are therefore likely to contribute to disease behavior. We then looked at whether we could relate the genetic-based subgroups to the currently used clinical parameters. Although modest differences in prevalence of disease location and behavior could be observed among the CD clusters, Random Forest analysis showed that patients could not be allocated to one of the 6 genetic-based subgroups based on the typically used clinical parameters alone. This points to a poor relationship between the genetic-based subgroups and the used clinical subphenotypes.</p> </sec><sec> <title>Conclusions/Significance</title> <p>This approach serves as a first step to reclassify Crohn's disease. The used technique can be applied to other common complex diseases as well, and will help to complete patient characterization, in order to evolve towards personalized medicine.</p> </sec> [less ▲]

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See detailMolecular Reclassification of Crohn’s Disease by cluster analysis of genetic variants
Cleynen, I.; Mahachie John, Jestinah ULg; Henkaerts, L. et al

in Gut (2009)

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See detailMolecular Reclassification of Crohn’s Disease by cluster analysis of genetic variants.
Cleynen, I.; Mahachie John, Jestinah ULg; Henckaerts, Liesbet et al

in Acta Gastro-Enterologica Belgica (2010)

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See detailMolecular Reclassification of Crohn’s Disease by cluster analysis of genetic variants.
Cleynen, I.; Mahachie John, Jestinah ULg; Henckaerts, L. et al

in Gastroenterology (2010)

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See detailMolecular reclassification of Crohn's disease: a cautionary note on population stratification.
Maus, Barbel; Jung, Camille; Mahachie John, Jestinah ULg et al

in PloS one (2013), 8(10), 77720

Complex human diseases commonly differ in their phenotypic characteristics, e.g., Crohn's disease (CD) patients are heterogeneous with regard to disease location and disease extent. The genetic ... [more ▼]

Complex human diseases commonly differ in their phenotypic characteristics, e.g., Crohn's disease (CD) patients are heterogeneous with regard to disease location and disease extent. The genetic susceptibility to Crohn's disease is widely acknowledged and has been demonstrated by identification of over 100 CD associated genetic loci. However, relating CD subphenotypes to disease susceptible loci has proven to be a difficult task. In this paper we discuss the use of cluster analysis on genetic markers to identify genetic-based subgroups while taking into account possible confounding by population stratification. We show that it is highly relevant to consider the confounding nature of population stratification in order to avoid that detected clusters are strongly related to population groups instead of disease-specific groups. Therefore, we explain the use of principal components to correct for population stratification while clustering affected individuals into genetic-based subgroups. The principal components are obtained using 30 ancestry informative markers (AIM), and the first two PCs are determined to discriminate between continental origins of the affected individuals. Genotypes on 51 CD associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are used to perform latent class analysis, hierarchical and Partitioning Around Medoids (PAM) cluster analysis within a sample of affected individuals with and without the use of principal components to adjust for population stratification. It is seen that without correction for population stratification clusters seem to be influenced by population stratification while with correction clusters are unrelated to continental origin of individuals. [less ▲]

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See detailMolecular recognition force spectroscopy
Willet, Nicolas ULg; Lamprecht, Constanze; Rankl, Christian et al

in Duwez, Anne-Sophie; Willet, Nicolas (Eds.) Molecular manipulation with atomic force microscopy (2011)

This chapter describes the state of the art in molecular recognition force spectroscopy performed by AFM. The different aspects of the topic are discussed, as the appropriate techniques for the ... [more ▼]

This chapter describes the state of the art in molecular recognition force spectroscopy performed by AFM. The different aspects of the topic are discussed, as the appropriate techniques for the functionalization of cantilever tips and for the preparation of (biological) samples. The principles of single-molecule force spectroscopy are then explained, together with exciting and recent examples on synthetic and biological samples. Finally, the main techniques to map molecular recognition interactions are reviewed and discussed in terms of performances. Novel and interesting applications illustrate the use of these imaging methods. [less ▲]

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See detailMolecular requirements for ethanol differential allosteric modulation of glycine receptors based on selective Gbetagamma modulation.
Yevenes, Gonzalo E; Moraga-Cid, Gustavo; Avila, Ariel et al

in Journal of Biological Chemistry (2010), 285(39), 30203-13

It is now believed that the allosteric modulation produced by ethanol in glycine receptors (GlyRs) depends on alcohol binding to discrete sites within the protein structure. Thus, the differential ethanol ... [more ▼]

It is now believed that the allosteric modulation produced by ethanol in glycine receptors (GlyRs) depends on alcohol binding to discrete sites within the protein structure. Thus, the differential ethanol sensitivity of diverse GlyR isoforms and mutants was explained by the presence of specific residues in putative alcohol pockets. Here, we demonstrate that ethanol sensitivity in two ligand-gated ion receptor members, the GlyR adult alpha(1) and embryonic alpha(2) subunits, can be modified through selective mutations that rescued or impaired Gbetagamma modulation. Even though both isoforms were able to physically interact with Gbetagamma, only the alpha(1) GlyR was functionally modulated by Gbetagamma and pharmacological ethanol concentrations. Remarkably, the simultaneous switching of two transmembrane and a single extracellular residue in alpha(2) GlyRs was enough to generate GlyRs modulated by Gbetagamma and low ethanol concentrations. Interestingly, although we found that these TM residues were different to those in the alcohol binding site, the extracellular residue was recently implicated in conformational changes important to generate a pre-open-activated state that precedes ion channel gating. Thus, these results support the idea that the differential ethanol sensitivity of these two GlyR isoforms rests on conformational changes in transmembrane and extracellular residues within the ion channel structure rather than in differences in alcohol binding pockets. Our results describe the molecular basis for the differential ethanol sensitivity of two ligand-gated ion receptor members based on selective Gbetagamma modulation and provide a new mechanistic framework for allosteric modulations of abuse drugs. [less ▲]

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See detailMolecular sexing of Ursidae: application on extant and extinct brown bears
Pagès, Marie ULg; Maudet, Célia; Bellemain, Eva et al

Poster (2005, September)

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See detailMolecular size and symmetry of Pseudomonas aeruginosa catabolic ornithine carbamoyltransferase. An X-ray crystallography analysis.
Marcq, S.; Diaz-Ruano, A.; Charlier, Paulette ULg et al

in Journal of Molecular Biology (1991), 220(1), 9-12

The catabolic ornithine carbamoyltransferase (EC 2.1.3.3) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, that shows allosteric behaviour, and a mutant version of this enzyme has been crystallized in several different ... [more ▼]

The catabolic ornithine carbamoyltransferase (EC 2.1.3.3) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, that shows allosteric behaviour, and a mutant version of this enzyme has been crystallized in several different crystal forms. All of these have been characterized by X-ray diffraction methods. A 4.5 A resolution data set has been collected on a triclinic crystal. Analysis of the data using the self-rotation function shows that 12 monomers associate to form a particle with cubic 23 point group symmetry. [less ▲]

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See detailMolecular Spectra in Cosmic Sources
Swings, Polydore ULg

in Hynek, Joseph Allen (Ed.) Astrophysics; a topical symposium commemorating the fiftieth anniversary of the Yerkes Observatory and a half century of progress in astrophysics (1951)

Brief Introduction to Molecular Spectroscopy Identification of Molecules in Spectra Excitation and Ionization Phenomena in Molecular Spectra Suggested Astronomical Observations of Importance Suggested ... [more ▼]

Brief Introduction to Molecular Spectroscopy Identification of Molecules in Spectra Excitation and Ionization Phenomena in Molecular Spectra Suggested Astronomical Observations of Importance Suggested Laboratory and Theoretical Investigations Suggestions for Desirable Theoretical Astrophysical Investigations General Conclusion [less ▲]

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See detailMolecular Structure and Surface Order in Monolayers of Alkanethiols Evidenced by HREELS
Duwez, Anne-Sophie ULg; Yu, L.M.; Riga, J. et al

Conference (1997, August 24)

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See detailMolecular Structure and Surface Order in Monolayers of Alkanethiols Evidenced by HREELS
Duwez, Anne-Sophie ULg; Yu, Li-Ming; Riga, Joseph et al

in Thin Solid Films (1998), 327-329

Structural characteristics and order within n-alkanethiols, a,q-alkanedithiols and a-cycloalkyl-q-alkanethiols monolayers self-assembled on gold have been investigated using high resolution electron ... [more ▼]

Structural characteristics and order within n-alkanethiols, a,q-alkanedithiols and a-cycloalkyl-q-alkanethiols monolayers self-assembled on gold have been investigated using high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS). The coherent domain sizes have been estimated from the angular distribution of the elastic peak as a function of the nature of the alkane chain and of the immersion time in the thiol solutions. These data have revealed many defects in the organization of the monolayers on evaporated gold substrates. It has been shown that the domains are smaller on Au(100) than on Au(111). [less ▲]

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