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See detailNon-aqueous capillary electrophoretic enantioseparation of N-derivatized amino acids using cinchona alkaloids and derivatives as chiral counter-ions.
Piette, Véronique; Fillet, Marianne ULg; Lindner, W. et al

in Journal of Chromatography. A (2000), 875(1-2), 353-60

A non-aqueous capillary electrophoretic method developed with quinine and tert.-butyl carbamoylated quinine as chiral selectors for the enantioseparation of N-protected amino acids was applied to the ... [more ▼]

A non-aqueous capillary electrophoretic method developed with quinine and tert.-butyl carbamoylated quinine as chiral selectors for the enantioseparation of N-protected amino acids was applied to the investigation of other quinine derivatives as chiral additives. The optimum composition of the background electrolyte was found to be 12.5 mM ammonia, 100 mM octanoic acid and 10 mM chiral selector in an ethanol-methanol (60:40, v/v) mixture. Under these conditions, a series of chiral acids, as various benzoyl, 3,5-dinitrobenzoyl and 3,5-dinitrobenzyloxycarbonyl amino acid derivatives were investigated with regards to selectand-selector relationships and enantioselectivity employing quinine, quinidine, cinchonine, cinchonidine, tert.-butyl carbamoylated quinine, tert.-butyl carbamoylated quinidine, dinitrophenyl carbamoylated quinine and cyclohexyl carbamoylated quinine as chiral selector. [less ▲]

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See detailA non-canonical caleosin from Arabidopsis efficiently epoxidizes physiological unsaturated fatty acids with complete stereoselectivity
Bléé, Elizabeth; Flenet, Martine; Boachon, Benoit et al

in FEBS Journal (2012), 279

Detailed reference viewed: 12 (3 ULg)
See detailNon-classical Radiation from Two Atoms and Quantum Search Algorithms
Agarwal, G. S.; von Zanthier, J.; Bastin, Thierry ULg

Conference (2005)

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See detailA Non-Cofactor Role of Thiamine Derivatives in Excitable Cells?
Bettendorff, Lucien ULg

in Archives of Physiology & Biochemistry (1996), 104(6), 745-751

Thiamine diphosphate (TDP) is an important cofactor of pyruvate (PDH) and alpha-ketoglutarate (KGDH) dehydrogenases and transketolase. Thiamine deficiency leads to reversible and irreversible brain ... [more ▼]

Thiamine diphosphate (TDP) is an important cofactor of pyruvate (PDH) and alpha-ketoglutarate (KGDH) dehydrogenases and transketolase. Thiamine deficiency leads to reversible and irreversible brain lesions due to impaired oxidative metabolism. A specific non-cofactor role for thiamine has also been proposed in excitable cells and thiamine triphosphate (TTP) might be involved in the regulation of ion channels. Thiamine is taken up by neuroblastoma cells through a high affinity transporter. Inside the cells, it is rapidly phosphorylated to TDP. This high turnover TDP pool is the precursor for TTP. Most of the TDP however has a low turnover and is associated with PDH and KGDH in mitochondria. In excised inside-out patches from neuroblastoma cells, TTP, at a concentration of 1 microM, activates chloride channels of large unitary conductance, the so-called maxi-Cl- channels. These channels are inhibited by oxythiamine from the outide. In addition to the role of TTP in the regulation of chloride channels, thiamine itself, or a presently unknown analog, may have trophic effects on neuronal cells. [less ▲]

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See detailNon-competition concerns under the ECMR - An overview
Petit, Nicolas ULg

in Concurrences : Revue des Droits de la Concurrence (2008), 4-2008

This article lists the EC merger cases where noncompetition concerns were raised (industrial policy, social concerns, personal data protection etc.). It summarizes the issues raised by non-competition ... [more ▼]

This article lists the EC merger cases where noncompetition concerns were raised (industrial policy, social concerns, personal data protection etc.). It summarizes the issues raised by non-competition concerns in the ECMR. [less ▲]

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See detailNon-conforming element for accurate modelling of MEMS
Rochus, Véronique ULg; Rixen, Daniel J.; Golinval, Jean-Claude ULg

in Finite Elements in Analysis & Design (2007), 43(10), 749-756

In this work different modelling techniques are investigated to simulate the dynamic behaviour of slender structures on which electrostatic forces are acting. In particular, non-conforming elements are ... [more ▼]

In this work different modelling techniques are investigated to simulate the dynamic behaviour of slender structures on which electrostatic forces are acting. In particular, non-conforming elements are tested to model micro- mechanical devices (or MEMS) having a very large aspect ratio. These elements are constructed on linear shape functions enriched by internal second-order polynomials. As a consequence the element compatibility is not exactly satisfied, but such elements can efficiently model beam- or shell-like structures with a small number of degrees of freedom. The advantage of non-conforming elements compared to shell or beam elements is that they are volume elements and can therefore easily be combined with other volume finite elements. For micro-mechanical systems the structure must be coupled to the electrostatic domain with the so-called electro-mechanical elements that solve for the electrostatic potential and generate the electrostatic forces. This paper shows that constructing coupled electro-mechanical models for high aspect ratio systems is then greatly simplified when non-conforming finite elements are used. The theory is presented for small deformations and also for large displacements where geometric non-linearities must be accounted for. The elements proposed in this paper are based on non-conforming formulations published earlier. The efficiency of the non-conforming approach combined with specific electro-mechanical elements is highlighted in the analysis of two simple MEMS for which the pull-in voltage is computed. (C) 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailNon-conventional Political Participation as an outcome of Discrimination Feeling
Gavray, Claire ULg; Born, Michel ULg

Scientific conference (2012, April 17)

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See detailNon-conventional.illegal political participation of male and female youths
Gavray, Claire ULg; Fournier; Born, Michel ULg

in Human Affairs (2012), 22

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See detailNon-confined jet-slot-cavity oscillator: flow-acoustic interaction modeling
Glesser, Martin; Billon, Alexis ULg; Valeau, Vincent et al

Conference (2006, May)

Disturbing whistling due to self-sustained oscillations can be produced in a wide variety of geometries where a sheared subsonic flow impinges on a downstream obstacle. When those self-sustained ... [more ▼]

Disturbing whistling due to self-sustained oscillations can be produced in a wide variety of geometries where a sheared subsonic flow impinges on a downstream obstacle. When those self-sustained oscillations are coupled with an acoustic resonator, the acoustic production can reach dramatically high levels. The configuration known as jet-slot oscillator is studied in the particular case where the resonator is the flow-supply duct and the source region is unconfined. This sound production is due to flow-acoustic interactions and can be modeled by using the vortex-sound theory. It allows one to express the acoustic power generated by the interaction between the acoustic, velocity, and vorticity fields. They are obtained separately by using rather simple models together with experimental input data. The vorticity field is modeled with the assumption that the shear layer is rectilinear and the vorticity is only concentrated on discrete vortex-points convected at constant velocity. The vorticity being non null only in the shear layer, the velocity field is calculated only in this region where it is equal to the vortices convection speed. The source region dimensions being small compared to the acoustic wavelength, this field is considered, in harmonic regime, as a sinusoidal temporal fluctuation of a potential field. This field can be taken as resulting from the flow produced by the radiation of the flow supply duct's acoustic resonance. It is obtained by solving the Poisson equation in a simplified geometry obtained by Schwarz-Christoffel mapping. The configuration studied here presents some specific problems which must be addressed to correctly model its sound production. Experimentations are used to specify the missing parameters. The major one is the synchronisation between the vorticity field and the acoustic field which governs the way that the vortices interact with the resonant acoustic field. At last, comparison between experimental data and modeling results permits to validate the study, in terms of emitted frequency. Further developments of the model will allow to predict the emitted sound level. [less ▲]

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See detailThe non-core regions of human lysozyme amyloid fibrils influence cytotoxicity.
Mossuto, Maria F; Dhulesia, Anne; Devlin, Glyn et al

in Journal of Molecular Biology (2010), 402(5), 783-96

Identifying the cause of the cytotoxicity of species populated during amyloid formation is crucial to understand the molecular basis of protein deposition diseases. We have examined different types of ... [more ▼]

Identifying the cause of the cytotoxicity of species populated during amyloid formation is crucial to understand the molecular basis of protein deposition diseases. We have examined different types of aggregates formed by lysozyme, a protein found as fibrillar deposits in patients with familial systemic amyloidosis, by infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and depolymerization experiments, and analyzed how they affect cell viability. We have characterized two types of human lysozyme amyloid structures formed in vitro that differ in morphology, molecular structure, stability, and size of the cross-beta core. Of particular interest is that the fibrils with a smaller core generate a significant cytotoxic effect. These findings indicate that protein aggregation can give rise to species with different degree of cytotoxicity due to intrinsic differences in their physicochemical properties. [less ▲]

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See detailA non-cytosolic protein of Trypanosoma evansi induces CD45-dependent lymphocyte death.
Antoine-Moussiaux, Nicolas ULg; Cornet, Anne ULg; Cornet, François ULg et al

in PLoS ONE (2009), 4(5), 5728

In a recent study dealing with a mouse model of Trypanosoma evansi-associated disease, a remarkable synchrony between the parasitaemia peak and the white-blood-cell count nadir was noticed. The present ... [more ▼]

In a recent study dealing with a mouse model of Trypanosoma evansi-associated disease, a remarkable synchrony between the parasitaemia peak and the white-blood-cell count nadir was noticed. The present study was designed to establish whether there is a direct causal link between the parasite load during its exponential phase of growth and the disappearance of peripheral blood leukocytes. In vitro experiments performed with trypanosomes and purified peripheral blood mononucleated cells revealed the existence of a lymphotoxin embedded in the T. evansi membrane: a protein sensitive to serine proteases, with a molecular mass of less than 30 kDa. Lymphocytes death induced by this protein was found to depend on the intervention of a lymphocytic protein tyrosine phosphatase. When lymphocytes were exposed to increasing quantities of a monoclonal antibody raised against the extracellular portion of CD45, a transmembrane protein tyrosine phosphatase covering over 10% of the lymphocyte surface, T. evansi membrane extracts showed a dose-dependent decrease in cytotoxicity. As the regulatory functions of CD45 concern not only the fate of lymphocytes but also the activation threshold of the TCR-dependent signal and the amplitude and nature of cytokinic effects, this demonstration of its involvement in T. evansi-dependent lymphotoxicity suggests that T. evansi might manipulate, via CD45, the host's cytokinic and adaptive responses. [less ▲]

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See detailNon-destructive characterization of deer (Cervus Elaphus) antlers by X-ray microtomography coupled with image analysis
Léonard, A.; Guiot, L. P.; Pirard, J. P. et al

in Journal of Microscopy (2007), 225(3), 258-263

X-ray microtomography coupled with image analysis was tested as a non-destructive alternative method for the textural characterization of the trabecular part of deer antlers (Cervus Elaphus). As gas ... [more ▼]

X-ray microtomography coupled with image analysis was tested as a non-destructive alternative method for the textural characterization of the trabecular part of deer antlers (Cervus Elaphus). As gas adsorption and mercury intrusion cannot be applied on this soft and spongy material, its pore texture was, up to now, determined from histological sections that give only two-dimensional information. In this work, X-ray microtomography is used to scan entire or half pieces of antlers and three-dimensional image analysis is performed in order to assess the differences between samples collected at various antler locations. Results clearly show a porosity profile along the sample diameter. The pore size distribution is showed to be dependent on the sample original site. [less ▲]

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See detailNon-destructive characterization of deer (Cervus Elaphus) antlers by X-ray microtomography coupled with image analysis
Léonard, Angélique ULg; Guiot, L. P.; Pirard, Jean-Paul ULg et al

in Journal of Microscopy-Oxford (2007), 225(Pt 3), 258-263

X-ray microtomography coupled with image analysis was tested as a non-destructive alternative method for the textural characterization of the trabecular part of deer antlers (Cervus Elaphus). As gas ... [more ▼]

X-ray microtomography coupled with image analysis was tested as a non-destructive alternative method for the textural characterization of the trabecular part of deer antlers (Cervus Elaphus). As gas adsorption and mercury intrusion cannot be applied on this soft and spongy material, its pore texture was, up to now, determined from histological sections that give only two-dimensional information. In this work, X-ray microtomography is used to scan entire or half pieces of antlers and three-dimensional image analysis is performed in order to assess the differences between samples collected at various antler locations. Results clearly show a porosity profile along the sample diameter. The pore size distribution is showed to be dependent on the sample original site. [less ▲]

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See detailNon-destructive characterization of the Nizet Manuscript (XVIIIth century) : first results
Machowski, Mélanie ULg; Calvo Del Castillo, Helena ULg; Hocquet, François-Philippe et al

Poster (2012, June)

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See detailNon-destructive extraction of junction depths of active doping profiles from photomodulated optical reflectance offset curves
Bogdanowicz, Janusz; Dortu, Fabian; Clarysse, Trudo et al

in Journal of Vacuum Science & Technology : Part B (2010), 28(1), 11

The ITRS Roadmap highlights the electrical characterization of the source and drain extension regions as a key challenge for future complimentary-metal-oxide-semiconductor technology. Presently, an ... [more ▼]

The ITRS Roadmap highlights the electrical characterization of the source and drain extension regions as a key challenge for future complimentary-metal-oxide-semiconductor technology. Presently, an accurate determination of the depth of ultrashallow junctions can routinely only be performed by time-consuming and destructive techniques such as secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). In this work, the authors propose to use the fast and nondestructive photomodulated optical reflectance (PMOR) technique , as implemented in the Therma-Probe\textregistered (TP) dopant metrology system, for these purposes. PMOR is a pump-probe technique based on the measurement of the pump-induced modulated change in probe reflectance, i.e., the so-called (photo) modulated reflectance. In this article, the authors demonstrate that the absolute junction depths of boxlike active dopant structures can be extracted in a very simple and straightforward way from the TP offset curves, which represent the behavior of the modulated reflectance as a function of the pump-probe beam spacing. Although the procedure is based on the insights into the physical behavior of the offset curves, no modeling is involved in the actual extraction process itself. The extracted junction depths are in good correlation with the corresponding junction depths as measured by means of SIMS. The technique has a subnanometer depth sensitivity for depths ranging from 10 to 35 nm with the present Therma-Probe\textregistered 630XP system. The extension of the proposed procedure to the general ultrashallow profiles is also explored and discussed [less ▲]

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See detailNon-destructive measurement of volume magnetic properties of large, bulk superconductors
Vanderbemden, Philippe ULg; Dennis, T.; Shi, Y. H. et al

Conference (2012, December 07)

The development of large, single grain bulk superconductors by melt processing techniques has generated a need to characterize samples magnetically over large dimensions, exceeding typically 20 mm in ... [more ▼]

The development of large, single grain bulk superconductors by melt processing techniques has generated a need to characterize samples magnetically over large dimensions, exceeding typically 20 mm in diameter. The usual magnetic characterization gives relies on miniature Hall probe mapping and gives information about the field distribution above the sample surface. If volume properties are required (e.g. magnetization hysteresis loops), the sample needs to be cut in smaller pieces, since the DC magnetic characterization systems for measurements at cryogenic temperatures generally accommodate samples of relatively small size (typically < 5-10 mm diameter). In this work we describe how the hysteresis B(H) loops of large bulk superconducting samples exceeding 10 mm diameter can be determined using home-made sensing coils, either in liquid nitrogen or within the experimental chamber of a Quantum Design Physical Property Measurement System (PPMS). Magnetic properties are measured and compared to those given by several Hall probes attached to both faces of sample. The system is used successfully to measure the DC hysteresis loops of entire (RE)BCO bulk superconducting domains. A careful data acquisition and numerical integration of pick-up coil voltage enables the sweep rate of the magnetic field to be varied from 0.5 to 10 mT/s while keeping an excellent signal/noise ratio. A simple model based on demagnetizing field approach is used to emphasize how the hysteresis loops determined by this technique differ from “true” magnetization loops derived from classical magnetic moment measurements (e.g. SQUID or VSM). These differences are supported with numerical modelling of the average magnetization of the bulk sample using the Brandt method. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 70 (14 ULg)