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See detailL'architecture et la sculpture gothiques. Des clefs pour comprendre
Van den Bossche, Benoît ULg

in Staquet, Anne (Ed.) Au temps des cathédrales... (2009)

Detailed reference viewed: 110 (11 ULg)
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See detailArchitecture et logement social. Un héritage en perspective
Frankignoulle, Pierre ULg

in Architectures, Wallonie-Bruxelles. Inventaires-Inventories 2005-2010 (2010)

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See detailArchitecture et minimum : quel degré zéro ?
Dawans, Stéphane ULg

in Intervalles (2004), 1

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See detailAn architecture for an anonymity network
Rennhard, M.; Rafaeli, S.; Mathy, Laurent ULg et al

in Enabling Technologies: Infrastructure for Collaborative Enterprises, 2001. WET ICE 2001. Proceedings. Tenth IEEE International Workshops on (2001)

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See detailAn architecture for pseudonymous e-commerce
Rafaeli, S.; Rennhard, M.; Mathy, Laurent ULg et al

in Proceedings of AISB 2001 (2001)

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See detailArchitecture française du Grand Siècle : entre théorie et pratique
Gilles, Isabelle ULg

Scientific conference (2011, November 08)

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See detailL’architecture générale et les grands axes du code pénal social
Kefer, Fabienne ULg

in Kefer, Fabienne (Ed.) La fraude sociale, une priorité de politique criminelle? (2009, September)

Detailed reference viewed: 39 (11 ULg)
See detailL’architecture gothique au-delà du Moyen Age : les cas du comté de Hainaut et du diocèse de Liège
Joly, Emmanuel ULg

Conference (2013, May 03)

Emblématique du bas Moyen Age, le style gothique reste souvent cantonné dans les limites traditionnelles que l’on accorde à cette période historique. Lorsque l’art gothique, et plus spécifiquement ses ... [more ▼]

Emblématique du bas Moyen Age, le style gothique reste souvent cantonné dans les limites traditionnelles que l’on accorde à cette période historique. Lorsque l’art gothique, et plus spécifiquement ses expressions architecturales, déborde sur l’époque moderne, il est largement ignoré de la littérature ou, au mieux, taxé de survivance archaïque. A travers l’espace du comté de Hainaut et du diocèse de Liège, nous verrons comment l’architecture tardo-gothique (XVIe-XVIIIe siècle) a été traitée par la littérature. Nous essaierons également d’évaluer l’ampleur du phénomène au sein de ces deux espaces et de formuler les questions que celui-ci pose à la recherche en histoire de l’architecture. [less ▲]

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See detailL'architecture l'exposition internationale de Liège en 1939
Charlier, Sébastien ULg

in Duchesne, Jean-Patrick; Micha, Edith (Eds.) L'art dégénéré dans les collections de l'ULg, Chagall, Ensor, Laurencin, Matisse, Vlaminck (2014)

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See detailL’architecture moderne à Liège dans les années 1930
Charlier, Sébastien ULg

in Duchesne, Jean-Patrick (Ed.) L'art dégénéré selon Hitler. La vente de Lucerne, 1939 (2014)

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See detailArchitecture of a Grid-Enabled Lattice-Boltzmann Middleware
Dethier, Gérard ULg; Marchot, Pierre ULg; de Marneffe, Pierre-Arnoul ULg

Poster (2008, May)

Lattice-Boltzmann (LB) simulation methods constitute a family of computational fluid dynamics methods that can deal with complex multiphysics models and are easily parallelizable. They are based on ... [more ▼]

Lattice-Boltzmann (LB) simulation methods constitute a family of computational fluid dynamics methods that can deal with complex multiphysics models and are easily parallelizable. They are based on modified lattice-gas automata. The algorithm of LB simulations is quite simple. Space is discretized into a lattice. Each node of this lattice has a state. This state indicates the proportion of particules moving along fixed directions (these proportions are generally called “fields”). At each time step, the state of all lattice nodes is updated. Each node first receives fields coming from its neighbors and then “collides” them by applying a collision operator which generates the new state. Grid computing can be defined as “coordinated resource sharing and problem solving in dynamic, multi-institutional collaborations”. In practice, a Grid user (which can be a software component) submits a job composed of tasks to the Grid. The tasks are automatically run on available computational resources across organizational boundaries (i.e. clusters of multiple departments). LaBoGrid is an application combining the concepts of LB modelling and Grid computing. It is able to run LB simulations on an arbitrary number of computational resources from a Grid. It deals with operating system and hardware performance heterogeneity. The former because LaBoGrid is written in Java. The latter thanks to load-balancing. This is essential because all LaBoGrid tasks are inter- connected and depend on information from one another. A slow LaBoGrid task will slow down the overall process. LaBoGrid is based on asynchronous agents exchanging messages. The two main agents are the Controller agent (CA) and the distributed agent (DA). In a deployed LaBoGrid system, the CA exists in only one instance. It keeps track of the DAs and their topology. A task agent running some arbitrary code can be attached to the CA (CAT) and the DAs (DAT). In LaBoGrid, LB-specialized task agents are used (this system could be adapted to other problems). A configuration file parsed by the LB CAT gives the parameters of an LB simulation. The LB CAT configures automatically the LB DATs which handle the simulation code. Currently, LB simulations are done on 3D fluids with 19 fields per state. However, the code can be adapted very easily to other fluid dimensions and different state definitions, storage and computation precisions and collision types. [less ▲]

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See detailL’architecture patricienne à Liège au XVIIIe siècle
Gilles, Isabelle ULg

Scientific conference (2013, January 29)

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See detailL'architecture postmoderniste dans la tourmente de l'idéologie du progrès
Steinmetz, Rudy ULg

in André Valérie, Contzen Jean-Pierre (Ed.) L'idéologie du progrès dans la tourmente du postmodernisme (2012, February 10)

Detailed reference viewed: 24 (9 ULg)
See detailL’architecture religieuse du doyenné de Visé (églises et chapelles)
Paquet, Pierre ULg; CLOSON-REMY, Marie-Ange; de LAMOTTE-REGINSTER, Nadine

in Trésors d’art religieux au pays de Visé et de Saint-Hadelin (1988)

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See detailL'architecture religieuse rurale à la fin du Moyen Age et au début des Temps modernes : réflexions méthodologiques
Joly, Emmanuel ULg

Conference (2014, January 31)

The end of the medieval era and the beginning of modern times are marked by the increasing importance of urban centres. But this period of time is also crucial for the reconstruction of religious ... [more ▼]

The end of the medieval era and the beginning of modern times are marked by the increasing importance of urban centres. But this period of time is also crucial for the reconstruction of religious buildings in rural areas. As a few scholars like Luc-Francis Génicot have already pointed out, a large quantity of church works were going on during the 15th and 16th century in villages throughout Europe. Although architectural historians often ignore these « marginal » buildings, these are nonetheless products of human activity and must therefore find a place within the scientific study of architecture. This lecture will then present the way the researcher, using the most recent approaches in architectural history, can reintegrate these buildings into the discipline. To study these parish churches, the architectural historian is confronted with an important amount of items. He has to understand the reasons for such abundance of constructions as well as their distribution in time and space. While dealing with formal and stylistic questions, the researcher should avoid any normative attitude leading to consider these churches simply as places of stylistical conservatism. Finally, for these low documented buildings, the architectural historian should try to answer questions as to planning, financing and implementation of church works. As a consequence, he also has to identify the various interveners in the building process. [less ▲]

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