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See detailIdentification of proteins discriminating inflammation induced dysplasia from simple inflammation in ulcerative colitis by laser capture microdissection and label free proteomics – a pilot study
Merli, Angela-Maria ULg; QUESADA-CALVO, Florence ULg; MASSOT, Charlotte ULg et al

Conference (2017, February 09)

Chronic colonic inflammation in ulcerative colitis (UC) may induce dysplasia, which can itself progress and transform into neoplasia. Diagnosis of dysplasia in UC remains difficult particularly when ... [more ▼]

Chronic colonic inflammation in ulcerative colitis (UC) may induce dysplasia, which can itself progress and transform into neoplasia. Diagnosis of dysplasia in UC remains difficult particularly when tissue inflammation is present. The aim of this retrospective pilot study was to highlight proteins specifically associated with inflammation induced dysplasia in UC. We performed a pilot experiment on 15 Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded (FFPE) samples isolated from 5 cases of UC patients with a Polypoïd Pedunculated dysplasia (UC-PP). We compared the proteomes of the UC-PP, the inflammatory (UC-I) and the normal (UC-NL) tissues of each patient. We performed Laser Capture Microdissection (LCM) in order to collect only epithelial cells, avoiding inflammatory infiltrating ones. Label free proteomic analysis using a 2D-nanoUPLC coupled with a hybrid Quadrupole-Orbitrap was applied, as well as differential analysis on the paired samples. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) characterisation of one of the selected proteins of interest was used for validation. Out of 985 quantified proteins, 7 were found significantly more abundant in UC-PP compared to UC-I tissues, with 6 being only detected in UC-PP using proteomics. One of these is Solute Carrier Family 12 member 2 (SLC12A2), also known as Na-K-2Cl co-transporter 1 (NKCC1), a protein involved in ionic balance, in T-cell migration promotion and in some features involved in cancer development like proliferation, migration or invasion. IHC results obtained were in correlation with proteomic results and showed that SLC12A2 was more abundant in UC-PP tissue than in UC-I and UC-NL tissues, with a signal clearly delimiting the dysplastic region from the surrounding inflammatory tissue. This pilot experiment shows a different proteomic profile in inflammation-associated dysplasia and simple inflammation. This should be replicated using other types of dysplasia in IBD. SLC12A2 could be a potential biomarker of inflammation-associated dysplasia. [less ▲]

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See detailIdentification of proteins from wild cardoon flowers (Cynara cardunculus L.) by a proteomic approach
Ben Amira, Amal; Bauwens, Julien ULg; De Pauw, Edwin ULg et al

in Journal of Chemical Biology (in press)

Proteomic approach was applied to identify total proteins, particularly the enzymatic content, from wild cardoon flowers. As the selection of an appropriate sample preparation method is the key for ... [more ▼]

Proteomic approach was applied to identify total proteins, particularly the enzymatic content, from wild cardoon flowers. As the selection of an appropriate sample preparation method is the key for getting reliable results, two different extraction/precipitation methods (trichloroacetic acid and phenol/ammonium acetate) were tested on fresh and lyophilized flowers. After two-dimensional electrophoresis (2D–E) separations, a better protein pattern was obtained after phenol extraction from lyophilized flowers. Only 46 % of the total analyzed spots resulted in a protein identification by mass spectrometry MALDI-TOF. Four proteases (cardosins A, E, G, and H), which have become a subject of great interest in dairy technology, were identified. They presented molecular weights and isoelectric points very close and high levels of homology between matched peptides sequences. The absence of the other cardosins (B, C, D, and F) could be an advantage, as it reduces the excessive proteolytic activity that causes bitter flavors and texture defects, during cheese making. [less ▲]

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See detailIdentification of Psf, the Polypyrimidine Tract-Binding Protein-Associated Splicing Factor, as a Developmentally Regulated Neuronal Protein
Chanas-Sacre, Grazyna; Mazy-Servais, Cécile; Wattiez, Ruddy et al

in Journal of Neuroscience Research (1999), 57(1), 62-73

The polypyrimidine tract-binding protein-associated splicing factor (PSF), which plays an essential role in mammalian spliceosomes, has been found to be expressed by differentiating neurons in developing ... [more ▼]

The polypyrimidine tract-binding protein-associated splicing factor (PSF), which plays an essential role in mammalian spliceosomes, has been found to be expressed by differentiating neurons in developing mouse brain. The sequence of a fragment of mouse PSF was found to be remarkably similar to that of human PSF. Both the expression of PSF mRNA in cortex and cerebellum and PSF immunoreactivity in all brain areas were high during embryonic and early postnatal life and almost disappeared in adult tissue, except in the hippocampus and olfactory bulb where various neuronal populations remained PSF-immunopositive. Double-labeling experiments with anti-PSF antibody and anti-neurofilaments or anti-glial fibrillary acidic protein antibodies on sections of cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum indicate that PSF is expressed by differentiating neurons but not by astrocytic cells. In vitro, mouse PSF was found to be expressed by differentiating cortical and cerebellar neurons. Radial glia or astrocyte nuclei were not immunopositive; however, oligodendrocytes differentiating in vitro were found to express PSF. The restricted expression of PSF suggests that this splicing factor could be involved in the control of neuronal-specific splicing events occurring at particular stages of neuronal differentiation and maturation. [less ▲]

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See detailIdentification of Pythium species inducing common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) root rot symptoms and development of backcrosses to improve the level of varietal resistance to this disease
Nzungize Rusagara, John ULg

Doctoral thesis (2012)

The common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is the most important food legume grown worldwide. It is a prioritary crop in various countries of East Africa and is grown mainly by small farmers for home ... [more ▼]

The common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is the most important food legume grown worldwide. It is a prioritary crop in various countries of East Africa and is grown mainly by small farmers for home consumption, the excess being sold in markets. Important yield losses of common bean induced by root rot diseases have been identified in several countries in East Africa including Rwanda. This is partly explained by the intensification of the cultivation of beans, the absence of rotations, the practice of continuous cultivation of this legume, and decline in soil fertility. Although bean root rot symptoms are caused by a number of soil borne pathogens depending on environmental conditions, Pythium spp. are the fungal pathogens most frequently associated with severe epidemics in eastern Africa. Studies on root rot have indicated that continuous cropping of beans, a common practice in eastern Africa, exacerbates the problem. This work was undertaken to improve the varietal resistance of common bean to limit the damages caused by Pythium in Rwanda. An analysis of the diversity of Pythium species associated with root rot was conducted through collect of samples of common bean plants throughout the country and through the characterization of the Pythium species causing root rot. The collected samples were used to isolate 96 typical Pythium colonies which were classified into 16 Pythium species according to their respective molecular sequences of the ribosomal ITS fragments. Molecular characterization using the ITS-DNA sequences was also carried out on samples isolated on infected beans roots. The study of the distribution of each species identified within the samples analyzed, revealed that Pythium vexans is the most widespread taxon in the different common bean producing areas in Rwanda. Pathogenicity tests of the 16 identified Pythium species were performed on a set of 10 common bean varieties. The results showed that all identified Pythium species were pathogenic to common bean: they all induce symptoms of root rot under controlled conditions. However, the common bean varieties used in this investigation showed differences in their reaction to inoculation with the 16 Pythium species. At the end of this work of the characterization of Pythium species isolated in Rwanda, a scheme for improving varietal resistance has been implemented. It is based on a backcross protocol assisted by molecular marker (PYAA 19800). Recurrent parents are composed of three common bean varieties traditionally grown in Rwanda while the two donor parents are a resistant variety of the Mesoamerican gene pool and a resistant variety of Andean pool. The progeny obtained after the backcrossing program was subjected to the pathogenicity trials by inoculating with a strain of Pythium ultimum in controlled conditions in order to verify the effectiveness of this improvement protocol. These trials have shown that in the offspring all the individuals showing the presence of the marker gene were also resistant to Pythium with very low levels of severity at the end of inoculation tests. [less ▲]

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See detailIdentification of radial glial cells within the developing murine central nervous system using a new immunohistochemical marker
Misson, Jean-Paul ULg; Yamamoto, M.; Edwards, M. A. et al

in Neuroscience (1988)

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See detailIdentification of radial glial cells within the developing murine central nervous system:studies based upon a new immunohistochemical marker
Misson, Jean-Paul ULg; Edwards, Michael; Yamamoto, Miyuki et al

in Developmental Brain Research (1988), 44

Detailed reference viewed: 30 (2 ULg)
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See detailIdentification of radial glial growth cones
Misson, Jean-Paul ULg; Evrard, P.; Gadisseux, J.-F. et al

in Neuroscience (1988)

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See detailIdentification of residues within human glycoprotein VI involved in the binding to collagen: evidence for the existence of distinct binding sites.
Lecut, Christelle ULg; Arocas, Veronique; Ulrichts, Hans et al

in Journal of Biological Chemistry (2004), 279(50), 52293-9

Glycoprotein VI (GPVI) has a crucial role in platelet responses to collagen. Still, little is known about its interaction with its ligands. In binding assays using soluble or cell-expressed human GPVI, we ... [more ▼]

Glycoprotein VI (GPVI) has a crucial role in platelet responses to collagen. Still, little is known about its interaction with its ligands. In binding assays using soluble or cell-expressed human GPVI, we observed that (i) collagen, and the GPVI-specific ligands collagen-related peptides (CRP) and convulxin, competed with one another for the binding to GPVI and (ii) monoclonal antibodies directed against the extracellular part of the human receptor displayed selective inhibitory properties on GPVI interaction with its ligands. Monoclonal antibody 9E18 strongly reduced the binding of GPVI to collagen/CRP, 3F8 inhibited its interaction with convulxin, whereas 9O12 prevented all three interactions. These observations suggest that ligand-binding sites are distinct, exhibiting specific features but at the same time also sharing some common residues participating in the recognition of these ligands. The epitope of 9O12 was mapped by phage display, along with molecular modeling of human GPVI, which allowed the identification of residues within GPVI potentially involved in ligand recognition. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed that valine 34 and leucine 36 are critical for GPVI interaction with collagen and CRP. The loop might thus be part of a collagen/CRP-binding site. [less ▲]

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See detailIdentification of responders to teriparatide therapy by procollagen Type I N-Propeptide (P1NP) using the least significant change approach
Eastell, R.; Chen, P.; Krege, J. H. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2005, March), 16(Suppl.3), 5

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See detailIdentification of Retinoic Acid Receptors target genes in MEFs
Delacroix, Laurence ULg; Moutier, Emmanuel; Davidson, Irwin

Poster (2008)

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See detailIdentification of Ritual Blood in African Artifacts Using TOF-SIMS and Synchrotron Radiation Microspectroscopies
Mazel, Vincent; Debois, Delphine ULg; Touboul, David et al

in Analytical Chemistry (2007), 79(24), 9253-9260

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See detailIdentification of several environmental odours with tin oxide sensor array : three years later
Romain, Anne-Claude ULg; Nicolas, Jacques ULg; Maternova, J.

Poster (2001)

The paper discusses the ability of recognition models to classify malodours in the environment three years after their calibration, with the same sources releasing odours. Two methodologies applicable ... [more ▼]

The paper discusses the ability of recognition models to classify malodours in the environment three years after their calibration, with the same sources releasing odours. Two methodologies applicable either in the lab or in the field are used. The effect of the long term drift of the sensors is highlighted on the results of principal component analysis and of discriminant function analysis. The paper examines also the applicability of some drift counteraction methods proposed in the literature. Handled with some care, a correction based on the drift direction in the principal components subspace should be applicable to the classification of real odorous sources in the field. [less ▲]

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See detailIdentification of Shiga toxin-producing (STEC) and enteropathogenic (EPEC) Escherichia coli in diarrhoeic calves and comparative genomics of O5 bovine and human STEC
Fakih, Ibrahim; Thiry, Damien ULg; Duprez, Jean-Noël ULg et al

in Veterinary Microbiology (2016)

Escherichia coli producing Shiga toxins (Stx) and the attaching-effacing (AE) lesion (AE-STEC) are responsible for (bloody) diarrhoea in humans and calves while the enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC ... [more ▼]

Escherichia coli producing Shiga toxins (Stx) and the attaching-effacing (AE) lesion (AE-STEC) are responsible for (bloody) diarrhoea in humans and calves while the enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) producing the AE lesion only cause non-bloody diarrhoea in all mammals. The purpose of this study was (i) to identify the pathotypes of enterohaemolysin-producing E. coli isolated between 2009 and 2013 on EHLY agar from less than 2 month-old diarrhoeic calves with a triplex PCR targeting the stx1, stx2, eae virulence genes; (ii) to serotype the positive isolates with PCR targeting the genes coding for ten most frequent and pathogenic human and calf STEC O serogroups; and (iii) to compare the MLSTypes and virulotypes of calf and human O5 AE-STEC after Whole Genome Sequencing using two server databases (www.genomicepidemiology.org). Of 233 isolates, 206 were triplex PCR-positive: 119 AE-STEC (58%), 78 EPEC (38%) and 9 STEC (4%); and the stx1+eae+ AE-STEC (49.5%) were the most frequent. Of them, 120 isolates (84% of AE-STEC, 23% of EPEC, 22% of STEC) tested positive with one O serogroup PCR: 57 for O26 (47.5%), 36 for O111 (30%), 10 for O103 (8%) and 8 for O5 (7%) serogroups. The analysis of the draft sequences of 15 O5 AE-STEC could not identify any difference correlated to the host. As a conclusion, (i) the AE-STEC associated with diarrhoea in young calves still belong to the same serogroups as previously (O5, O26, O111) but the O103 serogroup may be emerging, (ii) the O5 AE-STEC from calves and humans are genetically similar [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 38 (10 ULg)