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Peer Reviewed
See detailInvestigation of germinal centres in vivo and in vitro in the context of prion disease
Demonceau, C.; Defaweux, Valérie ULg; Flandroy, S. et al

Poster (2005, April)

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See detailInvestigation of height-resolved information in ground-based high-resolution Fourier infrared solar spectra above the Jungfraujoch
Barret, Brice; De Mazière, Martine; Demoulin, Philippe ULg et al

in Proceedings of the Quadriennal ozone symposium - Sapporo 2000 (2000)

Vertical profiles of HF, O3, and HNO3 have been retrieved from high-resolution solar spectra recorded at the Jungfraujoch observatory (Swiss Alps, 46.5°N latitude, 8.0°E longitude, 3.58 km altitude). Two ... [more ▼]

Vertical profiles of HF, O3, and HNO3 have been retrieved from high-resolution solar spectra recorded at the Jungfraujoch observatory (Swiss Alps, 46.5°N latitude, 8.0°E longitude, 3.58 km altitude). Two algorithms for the retrieval of vertical concentration profiles based on the Optimal Estimation Method have been used. The results of the vertical profile retrievals are compared to the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) profiles, to the Cryogenic Infrared Spectrometers and Telescope (CRISTA2) second mission (August 1997) profiles for HNO3 and O3 and also to nearby ozone sondes and lidar profile for O3. [less ▲]

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See detailInvestigation of human JC and BK polyomaviruses in breast carcinomas
Hachana, Mohamed Ridha ULg; Amara, Khaled; Ziadi, Sonia et al

in Breast Cancer Research and Treatment (2011)

We have previously showed the presence of the simian virus 40 (SV40) and the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV)-like in a significant proportions of Tunisian breast carcinomas. However, to date there are no ... [more ▼]

We have previously showed the presence of the simian virus 40 (SV40) and the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV)-like in a significant proportions of Tunisian breast carcinomas. However, to date there are no published studies concerning evaluation of the possible implication of the human polyomaviruses JC (JCV) and BK (BKV) in breast carcinomas. The presence of JCV and BKV DNA was investigated by PCR in a 123 primary breast carcinomas and matched adjacent non-tumor breast tissues. The results were correlated to clinicopathological and virological parameters. JCV T-antigen DNA was detected in 23% of breast carcinoma cases; however, all cases were negative for BKV. JCV T antigen PCR products were further confirmed as authentic JCV genome by direct sequencing. JCV was found in invasive ductal carcinomas (28/112 cases) but not in invasive lobular carcinomas (0/5) or medullary carcinomas (0/6). JCV DNA presence correlates inversely with the expression of estrogen (P = 0.022) and progesterone (P = 0.008) receptors. JCV DNA presence correlates also with "triple negative" phenotype (P = 0.021). With regard to virological data, a trend toward an inverse correlation was noted between the presence of JCV and SV40 (P = 0.06). Moreover, significant correlation was found between multiple viral infection (JCV, and/or SV40, and/or MMTV-like in the same tumor) and "triple negative" phenotype (P = 0.001) and also with p53 accumulation (P = 0.028). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating the presence of JCV in a subset of breast carcinomas. Also our results suggest that "triple negative" breast carcinomas are viral-related tumors. [less ▲]

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See detailInvestigation of human papillomavirus (HPV) in breast cancer among women from Tunisia
Trimeche, Mounir; Hachana, Mohamed Ridha ULg; Ziadi, Sonia et al

in Virchows Archiv : An International Journal of Pathology (2007)

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See detailInvestigation of human papillomavirus in bladder cancer in a series of Tunisian patients
Ben Selma, Walid; Ziadi, Sonia; Ben Gacem, Riadh et al

in Pathology - Research & Practice (2010), 206(11), 740-743

Background: Association between human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and the development of bladder cancer is variable. Furthermore, the prevalence of HPV DNA in bladder carcinoma subtypes varies from ... [more ▼]

Background: Association between human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and the development of bladder cancer is variable. Furthermore, the prevalence of HPV DNA in bladder carcinoma subtypes varies from study to study. To clarify the impact of HPV infection on the development of bladder carcinoma, we performed a retrospective study on Tunisian patients for the status of HPV infection in urothelial carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma. Methods: A total of 125 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded archival tissue of bladder carcinoma were reviewed and classified according to the World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumors (119 urothelial carcinomas, five squamous carcinomas and one adenocarcinoma). Anogenital HPV DNA detection was performed with three different polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques. The first one, using primers pU-2R/pU-1M specific to high-risk oncogenic HPV. The second one, using primers PU-2R/PU-31B specific to low-risk oncogenic HPV and the third one, employing consensus primers (E1-547R/E1-350L). Results: No evidence of HPV infection was detected by morphological examination and PCR in any case of bladder carcinoma. Conclusion: Our study shows that anogenital HPV investigated are not associated with the pathogenesis of bladder cancer in Tunisia, however, the possibility that other subtypes of HPV contribute to bladder carcinogenesis remains to be clarified. [less ▲]

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See detailInvestigation of interactions between phospholipids, cholesterol and surfactin by atomic force microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry
Eeman, Marc; Nylander, Tommy; Dufrêne, Yves et al

Poster (2006)

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See detailInvestigation of intravalence, core-valence and core-core electron correlation effects in polonium atomic structure calculations
Quinet, Pascal ULg

in Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy & Radiative Transfer (2014), 145

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See detailInvestigation of Ion Mobility coupled with mass spectrometry (IMMS) for the screening of pesticide residues in food
Goscinny, Séverine ULg; Touilloux, Romain; Joly, Laure et al

Conference (2011, June)

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See detailInvestigation of liquid flow morphology inside a structured packing using X-ray tomography
Janzen, Anna; Steube, Julia; Aferka, Saïd et al

in Chemical Engineering Science (2013), 12

In this work X-ray tomography is used to analyse the influence of liquid viscosity on liquid flow in a column filled with Mellapak Plus 752Y structured packing. Tomographic measurements are performed at ... [more ▼]

In this work X-ray tomography is used to analyse the influence of liquid viscosity on liquid flow in a column filled with Mellapak Plus 752Y structured packing. Tomographic measurements are performed at various column heights for different liquid flow rates. Water and glycerine aqueous solutions are successively used as working liquids in order to quantify the influence of liquid viscosity on hydrodynamic quantities such as liquid hold-up and gas-liquid interfacial area. As expected, both liquid hold-up and gas-liquid interfacial area increase with liquid flow rate. An increase of liquid viscosity has also a positive impact on liquid hold-up and on gas-liquid interfacial area. In all cases, the measured quantities are not constant along the bed height, leading to fluctuating axial profiles. Furthermore, tomographic images are used to identify different liquid flow patterns (films, contact-point liquid, flooded regions) in the irrigated cross section images. A method based on morphological techniques is proposed to quantify the fraction of liquid flow within each flow pattern depending on flow rate and liquid viscosity. [less ▲]

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See detailInvestigation of liquid flow pattern inside a structured packing using X-ray tomography
Aferka, Saïd ULg; Steube, Julia; Janzen, Anna et al

in Proceedings of the 6th International Symposium on Process Tomography, Cape Town, South Africa (2012)

This work focuses on the analysis of X-ray tomographic images of liquid flow distribution within a 1 m high packed column of 10 cm diameter, filled with four Mellapak Plus 752Y elements. Tomographic ... [more ▼]

This work focuses on the analysis of X-ray tomographic images of liquid flow distribution within a 1 m high packed column of 10 cm diameter, filled with four Mellapak Plus 752Y elements. Tomographic measurements are performed at various column heights for different liquid flowrates. Water and aqueous glycerine solutions are successively used as working liquids in order to quantify the influence of liquid viscosity on the spatial distribution of hydrodynamic quantities such as liquid holdup and gas-liquid interfacial area. Logically, both liquid holdup and gas-liquid interfacial area increase with liquid flow rate. An increase of liquid viscosity has also a positive impact on liquid holdup and on gas-liquid interfacial area. In all cases, the measured quantities are not constant along the bed height, leading to fluctuating axial profiles. Depending on the liquid viscosity and flowrate, different liquid flow patterns (films, rivulets, flooded channels) are observed in the irrigated cross section images. A method based on morphological techniques is proposed to quantify the fraction of liquid flow which belongs to each flow pattern. [less ▲]

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See detailInvestigation of Mass Transfer on Single Droplets for the Reactive Extraction of Zinc with D2EHPA
Altunok, Mehmet Yücel; Kalem, Murat; Pfennig, Andreas ULg

in AIChE Journal (2012), 58(5), 1346-1355

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See detailInvestigation of mechanochemical processes by single-molecule AFM
Willet, Nicolas ULg

Scientific conference (2012, March 23)

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See detailInvestigation of methane production in Tunisian MSW landfills
Hiligsmann, Serge ULg; Mhiri, F.; Belaid, S. et al

Poster (2008, May)

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See detailInvestigation of methyl methacrylate and vinyl acetate polymerization promoted by Al(iBu)3/2,2'-bipyridine and Al(iBu)3/2,2'-bipyridine/TEMPO complexes
Granel, Claude; Jérôme, Robert ULg; Teyssié, Philippe et al

in Macromolecules (1998), 31(21), 7133-7141

Results of methyl methacrylate (MMA) and vinyl acetate (VOAc) polymerization using the Al(iBu)3/2,2‘-bipyridine/TEMPO initiating system at room temperature failed to confirm the “living” radical mechanism ... [more ▼]

Results of methyl methacrylate (MMA) and vinyl acetate (VOAc) polymerization using the Al(iBu)3/2,2‘-bipyridine/TEMPO initiating system at room temperature failed to confirm the “living” radical mechanism reported earlier. Several species apparently propagate without control in a normal free radical process and only above a critical initiator concentration. No evidence was found for the penta- and hexacoordinated aluminum species previously suggested, but high conversion to an alkoxyamine was observed. Additionally, mixing Al(iBu)3 and BIPY promotes a variety of reactions involving alkyl and hydride transfers to the aromatic rings forming reduced BIPY products, along with a persistent organoaluminum radical. All these results illustrate that the process is considerably more complicated than postulated before. Conversely, at −78 °C, a single active species excluding the participation of TEMPO has been put in evidence, displaying some “living” characteristics. Several experiments support its anionic nature, as previously suggested by Ikeda. [less ▲]

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See detailInvestigation of mevalonate pathway in aphids
Vandermoten, Sophie ULg; Yu, Wenjuan; Chen, Julian et al

Poster (2011, October)

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See detailInvestigation of Microcystin Congener–Dependent Uptake into Primary Murine Neurons
Feurstein, Daniel; Kleinteich, Julia ULg; Heussner, Alexandra H. A. H. et al

in Environmental health perspectives (2010), 118(10), 1370

Contamination of natural waters by toxic cyanobacteria is a growing problem worldwide, resulting in serious water pollution and human health hazards. Microcystins (MCs) represent a group of > 80 cyclic ... [more ▼]

Contamination of natural waters by toxic cyanobacteria is a growing problem worldwide, resulting in serious water pollution and human health hazards. Microcystins (MCs) represent a group of > 80 cyclic heptapeptides, mediating cytotoxicity via specific protein phosphatase (PP) inhibition at equimolar concentrations (comparable toxicodynamics). Because of the structure and size of MCs, active uptake into cells occurs via organic anion-transporting polypeptides (OATP/Oatp), as confirmed for liver-specific human OATP1B1 and OATP1B3, mouse Oatp1b2 (mOatp1b2), skate Oatp1d1, and the more widely distributed OATP1A2 expressed, for example, at the blood-brain barrier. Tissue-specific and cell-type-specific expression of OATP/Oatp transporters and specific transport of MC congeners (toxicokinetics) therefore appear prerequisite for the reported toxic effects in humans and other species upon MC exposure. Beyond hepatotoxicity induced by the MC-LR congener, the effects of other MC congeners, especially neuronal uptake and toxicity, are unknown. [less ▲]

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See detailInvestigation of nanoparticles as potential activators for the optimization of PAH biodegradation
Masy, Thibaut ULg; Wannoussa, Wissal ULg; Lambert, Stéphanie ULg et al

Poster (2012, April 10)

These last decades, through the industrial development and its imperfect waste management, the contamination by hydrocarbons in water and soils has led to a progressive deterioration of environmental ... [more ▼]

These last decades, through the industrial development and its imperfect waste management, the contamination by hydrocarbons in water and soils has led to a progressive deterioration of environmental quality, which is more and more considered nowadays. Amongst all the existing cleaning-up techniques, the bioremediation appears as the best compromise between treatment costs and effectiveness. However, this bioprocess remains time-consuming, especially for persistent pollutants as PAHs (Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons). A first way to improve the biodegradation consists in adding a consortium of efficient microorganisms in the polluted area (bioaugmentation). A further way to improve the bioremediation rate is based on the use of nutrients to assist the microbial metabolism (biostimulation). Our project gathers these two methods, specifically for the PAH biodegradation of polluted soils. Firstly, different suitable strains from our lab will be compared together in terms of PAH-degrading rate, in order to select the best microorganisms. As all these strains were selected from a long-term oil-polluted dried soil, they should be able to compete against the endogenous microflora, even if they are injected in the soil in a powdered starter. Secondly, trace elements in the nanoparticulate form, with concentrations of about 10-5M, will be added to catalyze the bacterial metabolism. First results already showed a sharp increase (2 to 3 fold) in the biodegradation kinetics, which is promising for the further scaling-up stages. In addition, this PhD project attempts to understand the mechanism of interaction between bacteria and nanoparticulate catalysts. [less ▲]

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