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See detailIn vitro reconstruction of epidermis from primary Darier's disease keratinocytes replicates the histopathological phenotype
LAMBERT DE ROUVROIT, CATHERINE; CHARLIER, CELINE; LEDERER, DAMIEN et al

in Journal of Dermatological Science (2013)

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See detailIn vitro recovery of ATP-sensitive potassium channels in Beta-cells from patients with hyperinsulinism in infancy; effects of low temperature and BPDZ 154
Cosgrove, K. E.; Gonzalez, A. M.; Lee, A. T. et al

in Journal of Physiology (2002), 544

Detailed reference viewed: 28 (16 ULg)
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See detailIn vitro release of salbutamol acetonide from solid lipid nanoparticles
Jaspart, Séverine ULg; Bodson, Cédric; Bertholet, Pascal et al

in Proceedings of 1st Pharmaceutical Sciences Fair and Exhibition (2005)

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See detailIn vitro root cultures of Panax ginseng and P-quinquefolium
Kevers, Claire ULg; Jacques, Philippe ULg; Thonart, Philippe ULg et al

in Plant Growth Regulation (1999), 27(3), 173-178

The paper describes a procedure for the initiation, subculture and continued proliferation of adventitious roots of Panax ginseng and Panax quinquefolium, which resemble hairy roots. The technique took ... [more ▼]

The paper describes a procedure for the initiation, subculture and continued proliferation of adventitious roots of Panax ginseng and Panax quinquefolium, which resemble hairy roots. The technique took advantage of the high powerful activity of a new synthetic auxin: benzo[b]selenienyl acetic acid (BSAA). Such initiation from root explants was dependent upon the season, the type and concentration of auxin. The hairy-like roots of ginseng could be subcultured by transfer every 4 weeks to fresh liquid medium either in agitated Erlenmeyer flasks or in bioreactors. Optimal conditions for a continued multiplication (up to 14 per month) were determined. The only practical problem was the limitation of the fresh mass as inoculum: the multiplication rate decreased with the increased quantity of roots. It is postulated that a root growth inhibiting substance was released into the media by the proliferating ginseng hairy roots. [less ▲]

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See detailIn vitro safety assessment of inhaled products using respiratory epithelial cells
Forbes, Ben; Cao Minh, Quin An; Evrard, Brigitte ULg et al

Poster (2010)

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See detailIn vitro screening of mare's milk antimicrobial effect and antiproliverative activity.
Guri, Anilda; Paligot, Michèle; Crevecoeur, Sébastien ULg et al

in FEMS Microbiology Letters (2016), 363(2), 1-7

The aims of this study were to examine the effect of mare's milk on virulence gene expression of Salmonella Typhimurium and observe its potential activity on proliferation of adenocarcinoma Caco-2 cells ... [more ▼]

The aims of this study were to examine the effect of mare's milk on virulence gene expression of Salmonella Typhimurium and observe its potential activity on proliferation of adenocarcinoma Caco-2 cells. Different supernatants of mare's milk, raw or heat-treated at 65°C for 15 s or 30 min, were studied. The changes in hilA gene expression of Salmonella Typhimurium in presence of mare's milk supernatants were assessed using a reporter luminescent strain. A significant decrease in hilA gene expression was observed with all tested supernatants. Virulence gene expression was then assessed using qPCR on a wild-type strain of Salmonella Typhimurium. A significant decrease of hilA and ssrB2 gene expression was observed with raw milk supernatants but not with heat-treated supernatants. The same supernatants were administered to Caco-2 cells to measure their proliferation rate. A significant reduction of proliferative effect was observed only with raw milk supernatants. This study reports that raw mare's milk was able to modulate virulence gene expression of Salmonella Typhimurium and exerts antiproliferative effects on Caco-2 cells. These results may offer new approaches for promoting gastrointestinal health. [less ▲]

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See detailIn vitro screening of some Strychnos species for antiplasmodial activity
Philippe, Geneviève ULg; Angenot, Luc ULg; De Mol, Patrick ULg et al

in Journal of Ethnopharmacology (2005), 97(3), 535-539

The antiplasmodial activity of crude extracts of 19 species of Strychnos (Loganiaceae) was assessed in vitro against a chloroquine-susceptible strain of Plasmodium falciparum. For each species, ethyl ... [more ▼]

The antiplasmodial activity of crude extracts of 19 species of Strychnos (Loganiaceae) was assessed in vitro against a chloroquine-susceptible strain of Plasmodium falciparum. For each species, ethyl acetate (EtOAc) extracts were analysed and, for the most active species, methanolic (MeOH) extracts were also tested. Among them, Strychnos variabilis De Wild. seemed to be very promising (inhibitory concentration 50% (IC50) < 5 microg/ml) whereas two other species, Strychnos gossweileri Exell and Strychnos mellodora S. Moore, could be interesting (IC50 < 15 microg/ml) in further antimalarial studies. [less ▲]

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See detailIn vitro selection and characterization of DNA aptamers recognizing chloramphenicol
Mehta, Jaytry; Van Dorst, Bieke; Rouah-Martin, Elsa et al

in Journal of Biotechnology (2011), 155

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See detailIn vitro selection of Phytophthora citrophthora isolates resistant to phosphorous acid and fosetyl-Al.
Ali, M. K.; Lepoivre, Philippe ULg; Semal, J.

in Mededelingen van de Faculteit Landbouwwetenschappen (Rijksuniversiteit te Gent) (1988), 53(2b),

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See detailIn vitro simulation of oxic/suboxic diagenesis in an estuarine fluid mud subjected to redox oscillations
Abril, Gwenael; Commarieu, Marc-Vincent ULg; Etcheber, Henri et al

in Estuarine Coastal And Shelf Science (2010), 88(2), 279-291

Estuarine turbidity maxima (ETMs) are sites of intense mineralisation of land-derived particulate organic matter (OM), which occurs under oxic/suboxic oscillating conditions owing to repetitive ... [more ▼]

Estuarine turbidity maxima (ETMs) are sites of intense mineralisation of land-derived particulate organic matter (OM), which occurs under oxic/suboxic oscillating conditions owing to repetitive sedimentation and resuspension cycles at tidal and neap-spring time scales. To investigate the biogeochemical processes involved in OM mineralisation in ETMs, an experimental set up was developed to simulate in vitro oxic/anoxic oscillations in turbid waters and to follow the short timescale changes in oxygen, carbon, nitrogen, and manganese concentration and speciation. We present here the results of a 27-day experiment (three oxic periods and two anoxic periods) with an estuarine fluid mud from the Gironde estuary. Time courses of chemical species throughout the experiment evidenced the occurrence of four distinct characteristic periods with very different properties. Steady oxic conditions were characterised by oxygen consumption rates between 10 and 40 mu mol L-1 h(-1), dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) production of 9-12 mu mol L-1 h(-1), very low NE4+ and Mn2+ concentrations, and constant NO3 production rates (0.4 - 0.7 mu mol L-1 h(-1)) due to coupled ammonification and nitrification. The beginning of anoxic periods (24 h following oxic to anoxic switches) showed DIC production rates of 2.5-8.6 mu mol L-1 h(-1) and very fast NO consumption (5.6-6.3 mu mol L-1 h(-1)) and NH4+ production (1.4-1.5 mu mol L-1 h(-1)). The latter rates were positively correlated to NO concentration and were apparently caused by the predominance of denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonia. Steady anoxic periods were characterised by constant and low NO3- concentrations and DIG and NH4+ productions of less than 1.3 and 0.1 mu mol L-1 h(-1), respectively. Mn2+ and CH4 were produced at constant rates (respectively 0.3 and 0.015 mu mol L-1 h(-1)) throughout the whole anoxic periods and in the presence of nitrate. Finally, reoxidation periods (24-36 h following anoxic to oxic switches) showed rapid NH4+ and Mn2+ decreases to zero (1.6 and 0.8-2 mu mol L-1 h(-1), respectively) and very fast NO production (3 mu mol L-1 h(-1)). This NO3- production, together with marked transient peaks of dissolved organic carbon a few hours after anoxic to oxic switches, suggested that particulate OM mineralisation was enhanced during these transient reoxidation periods. An analysis based on C and N mass balance suggested that redox oscillation on short time scales (day to week) enhanced OM mineralisation relative to both steady oxic and steady anoxic conditions, making ETMs efficient biogeochemical reactors for the mineralisation of refractory terrestrial OM at the land-sea interface. (C) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailIn vitro stability and immunoreactivity of the native and recombinant plant food 2S albumins Ber e 1 and SFA-8
Murtagh, M.; Archer, D.; Dumoulin, Mireille ULg et al

in Clinical & Experimental Allergy : Journal of the British Society for Allergy & Clinical Immunology (2003), 8

Background The ability of an intact protein to reach the circulatory system may be a prerequisite to allergenicity and many allergens, particularly those from plant foods, have been found to be ... [more ▼]

Background The ability of an intact protein to reach the circulatory system may be a prerequisite to allergenicity and many allergens, particularly those from plant foods, have been found to be consistently more resistant to digestion by pepsin than other proteins. Objective This study assessed the pepsinolytic stability of native 2S albumins from Brazil nut and sunflower seed and their recombinant versions produced in Pichia pastoris. The physicochemical stability of native and recombinant Brazil nut 2S albumins and recombinant sunflower seed 2S albumin was also assessed. The immunoreactivity of native Brazil nut 2S albumin and recombinant 2S albumins was compared using serum from patients allergic to Brazil nuts and animals immunized with native 2S albumins. Methods Digestibility was measured in simulated gastric fluid followed by SDS-PAGE. Circular dichroism spectra were used to analyse unfolding, as proteins were denatured by temperature, pH and guanidinium chloride. Immunoreactivity was assessed by immunoblot, RAST and ELISA. Results Brazil nut 2S albumin was significantly more resistant to proteolytic digestion than other Brazil nut proteins. It was also resistant to thermally and chemically induced denaturation. Equally high resistance to proteolytic digestion was observed with sunflower seed 2S albumin. The recombinant albumins mirrored their native counterparts in stability and immunoreactivity. Conclusion The important food allergen Brazil nut 2S albumin is as stable to digestion as is sunflower seed 2S albumin, whose allergenicity has yet to be determined. The 2S albumins and their recombinant counterparts could not be easily denatured by physicochemical treatments. The results suggest that 2S albumin is the only Brazil nut protein to reach the gut immune system intact. The production of properly folded recombinant proteins will facilitate mechanistic studies as well as diagnostic testing and antigen-based therapies. [less ▲]

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See detailIn vitro stimulation of human gingival epithelial cell attachment to dentin by surface conditioning.
Van Heusden, Alain ULg; Goffinet, Gerhard ULg; Zahedi, Sharham et al

in Journal of Periodontology (1999), 70(6), 594-603

BACKGROUND: Chemical root conditioning is widely used to improve the outcome of regenerative periodontal therapies by favoring the attachment of the regenerated periodontal structures. Although the effect ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Chemical root conditioning is widely used to improve the outcome of regenerative periodontal therapies by favoring the attachment of the regenerated periodontal structures. Although the effect of root conditioning on periodontal mesenchymal cells is well documented, very little is known about its potential effect on the re-formation of the junctional epithelium, a crucial event for the protection of the wound. The goal of the present study was to test in vitro the consequences of dentin conditioning with citric acid or minocycline on the attachment kinetics and morphology of human gingival keratinocytes (HGK). METHODS: The attachment kinetics of HGK to samples of powdered human dentin (particle size 44 to 76 microm) were examined by use of 3H-labeled cells. The morphology of attached epithelial cells was then determined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). RESULTS: When the initial adhesion kinetics of cells on untreated dentin were tested, the percentage of attached HGK proved to be dependent on the number of plated cells and the time of incubation (from 0 to 12 hours). Conditioning the dentin by 3% citric acid or by minocycline-HCl (at 0.01, 0.1, or 2.5%) significantly increased (P <0.005) keratinocyte attachment beyond 6 hours, without notable differences between the 2 substances at any concentration. The attachment kinetics of HGK preincubated for 24 hours by 10 microg/ml minocyline-HCl on untreated dentin was found to be similar to that observed for non-preincubated cells. These results are in agreement with the SEM observations: indeed, the surface conditioning of dentin significantly modified the morphology of attached HGK, whereas the preincubation of these cells with minocyline-HCl did not. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that minocycline-HCl does not exert a direct effect on human gingival epithelial cells. In contrast, conditioning the dentin by citric acid or by minocycline stimulates the attachment of HGK, which could lead to a rapid periodontal healing by favoring the re-formation of a junctional epithelium. [less ▲]

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See detailIn Vitro Stimulation of the Prepubertal Rat Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Pulse Generator by Leptin and Neuropeptide Y through Distinct Mechanisms
LEBRETHON, Marie-Christine ULg; Vandersmissen, E.; Gerard, Arlette ULg et al

in Endocrinology (2000), 141(4), 1464-9

Leptin may act as a negative feedback signal to the brain in the control of appetite through suppression of neuropeptide Y (NPY) secretion and stimulation of cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript ... [more ▼]

Leptin may act as a negative feedback signal to the brain in the control of appetite through suppression of neuropeptide Y (NPY) secretion and stimulation of cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART), a new anorectic peptide. We aimed at studying whether leptin, NPY, and CART have related effects on the hypothalamic control of the pituitary-gonadal system and the developmental changes in NPY and CART effects. Using retrochiasmatic hypothalamic explants from prepubertal 15-day-old male rats, the GnRH interpulse interval (mean +/- SD: 62 +/- 5 min) was significantly reduced by 10(-7) M of leptin (46 +/- 3.3 min) as well as 10(-7) M of NPY (47 +/- 4.4 min) and 10(-6) M of CART (46 +/- 2.7 min), whereas the GnRH pulse amplitude was not affected. The stimulatory effects of different NPY receptor agonists [human PYY 3-36, porcine NPY 13-36, human (D-Trp 32) NPY, porcine (Leu 31 Pro 34) NPY, human pancreatic polypeptide (PP)], as well as the absent effects of rat PP were consistent with the involvement of the Y5-receptor subtype in mediation of NPY effects. Incubation with 10(-7) M of a Y5-receptor selective antagonist prevented the effect of NPY (61 +/- 4 vs. 46 +/- 2 min), whereas leptin and CART effects were not (47 +/- 3 vs. 46 +/- 3 min and 46 +/- 3 vs. 46 +/- 2 min, respectively), suggesting that NPY was not involved in leptin and CART effects. Using an anti-CART antiserum (1:1000), the reduction of GnRH interpulse interval caused by leptin was partially prevented (56.2 +/- 4 vs. 47.9 +/- 3.8 min), whereas the reduction of GnRH interval caused by NPY was not affected (45.9 +/-2.5 vs. 47.8 +/- 3.7). The GnRH interpulse interval was decreased by 10(-7) M of NPY at 5 days (72 +/- 3.8 vs. 91.9 +/- 3.5) as well as at 15 days, whereas such an effect was not observed anymore at 25 and 50 days. Similar effects were observed using 10(-6) M of CART-peptide. Using 10(-6) M of the Y5-receptor antagonist, the GnRH interpulse interval was significantly increased at 15 days (66.6 +/- 2.7 min), 25 days (56.5 +/- 39.9 min), and 50 days (52.5 vs. 38.2 min), whereas no change was observed at 5 days. Using the anti-CART antiserum, a significant increase of GnRH interpulse interval was observed at 25 days only. In conclusion, the stimulatory effects of leptin and NPY on the frequency of pulsatile GnRH secretion before puberty involve two distinct mechanisms. NPY causes acceleration of GnRH pulsatility via the Y5-receptor subtype, which is not involved in leptin effects while the CART is involved in leptin effects on GnRH secretion but not in NPY effects. The reduction of pulsatility by the Y5 antagonist provides evidence of endogenous NPY involvement in the control of GnRH secretion from the time of onset of puberty. [less ▲]

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See detailIn vitro studies on the Fc-receptor function of mononuclear phagocytes in rheumatoid arthritis: relation between the Fc-receptor blockade and the concanavalin A-binding capacity of autologous immunoglobulin G
Malaise, Michel ULg; Franchimont, P.; Houssier, C. et al

in Journal of Clinical Immunology (1986), 6(6), 442-456

The Fc-receptor (Fc-R) function of monocytes isolated from 19 control subjects and from 30 patients presenting with a rheumatoid arthritis (RA) was assessed in vitro by a classical rosette assay using IgG ... [more ▼]

The Fc-receptor (Fc-R) function of monocytes isolated from 19 control subjects and from 30 patients presenting with a rheumatoid arthritis (RA) was assessed in vitro by a classical rosette assay using IgG-coated sheep red blood cells. In RA patients, the percentage of monocytes forming rosettes was significantly lower than in controls (34.4 +/- 20.4 versus 67.4 +/- 4.5%; P less than 0.001). The blockade observed was reversed by a prior trypsin treatment of RA monocytes, the percentage of recovery being correlated with the IgG plasma levels. Besides, IgG purified from the serum of four RA patients bound a mean of 7.3, 5.2, 1.6, and 1.6 times more than normal IgG did onto concanavalin A (Con A), peanut agglutinin (PNA), phytohemagglutinin (PHA), and pokeweed mitogen (PWM), respectively. Although similar amounts of 125I-labeled normal and RA IgG were bound to normal monocytes, RA IgG inhibited more efficiently than normal IgG the Fc-R function of normal monocytes, for all concentrations tested (10 to 100 micrograms/100 microliters). A prior treatment of RA IgG by alpha-mannosidase, but not by beta-galactosidase, significantly reduced their inhibitory properties. The incubation of monocytes with D-mannose or mannan reduced their capacity to form rosettes. The percentage of monocytes forming rosettes in the presence of both mannan and normal IgG was significantly lower than that measured in the presence of normal IgG only. On the contrary, the rosetting capacity of monocytes in the presence of both RA IgG and mannan was the same as that calculated in the presence of RA IgG only. The inhibitory effect of RA IgG was not related to their abnormal circular dichroism. Our data suggest that the greater ability of RA IgG to block the Fc-R function of monocytes probably depends on the presence of a greater number of accessible mannosyl residues on the glycosidic side chains located in the Fc domain of the molecules. [less ▲]

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See detailIN VITRO STUDY OF A FIBER NETWORK TAILORED AS 3D-CELL MODEL
Sevrin, Chantal ULg; Lombart, François ULg; Godino, Miguel et al

Poster (2014, June 17)

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See detailIn vitro study of coinfection/superinfection parameters which can influence recombination events in noroviruses
Di Felice, Elisabetta; Ceci, Chiara; Toffoli, Barbara et al

Poster (2014, October 17)

Noroviruses (NoVs) are non-enveloped, single-stranded, positive-sense RNA viruses. They are important causes of acute non-bacterial gastroenteritis in humans worldwide but their study is currently yet ... [more ▼]

Noroviruses (NoVs) are non-enveloped, single-stranded, positive-sense RNA viruses. They are important causes of acute non-bacterial gastroenteritis in humans worldwide but their study is currently yet hampered by the lack of a cell culture system. NoVs genetically evolve by both point mutations and recombination and the murine norovirus (MuNoV) is considered as the best model for human NoVs. The aim of this study was to develop an experimental model based on the MuNoV in order to investigate coinfection/superinfection parameters that could impact recombination events. Monolayers of RAW264.7 cells were coinfected or superinfected with two MuNoV strains (CW1 and WU20) using different multiplicity of infection (0.1/1; 1/1 and 10/1 for CW1 and Wu20 , respectively) and time delays (0h; 0.5h; 1h; 2h; 4h; 8h; 12h and 24h) for infection. Supernatants were collected at 24 and 48 hours post-infection. Genomic copies of both viruses were first quantified by RT-QPCR. Then, viruses from the supernatants were plaque purified (36 clones per condition) and their recombinant status was checked by a real-time PCR discriminating method using primers targeting both extremity of the MuNoV genome. Results of quantitative and plaque picking assays are compared. Together, the results confirm that recombination does not frequently occur, at least in vitro and raise the issue on why these events are however so usual with in silico detection methods. The data also showed that superinfection exclusion seems to be triggered from 4h post infection with the first MuNoV. The mechanisms of the later should be still studied. [less ▲]

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