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Peer Reviewed
See detailInfluence of different exposure conditions to cigarette smoke on the pulmonary acute inflammatory response in mice
Steuve, J.; Cheu, Esteban ULg; Fievez, Laurence ULg et al

in Proceedings: Autumn Meeting of the Belgian Society of Fundamental and Clinical Physiology and Pharmacology (2007)

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See detailInfluence of Different Growth Conditions on the kefir grains production used in the kefiran synthesis
POP, Carmen; APOSTU, Sorin; SALANŢĂ, Liana et al

in Bulletin UASVM Food Science and Technology (2014), 71 (2)

The purpose of this study was to optimize the kefir grains biomass production, using milk as culture media. The kefir grains were cultured at different changed conditions to evaluate their effects ... [more ▼]

The purpose of this study was to optimize the kefir grains biomass production, using milk as culture media. The kefir grains were cultured at different changed conditions to evaluate their effects. Results showed that optimal culture conditions were using the organic skim milk, incubated at 25°C for 24 hours with a rotation rate of 125 rpm. According to results, the growth rate was 38.9 g/L for 24 h, at 25°C using the organic milk - OSM, 36.87 g/L during 24 hours, optimal time for propagation process gave 37.93 g/L kefir grains biomass when the effect of temperature level was tested. The homogenization of medium with shaker rotating induced a greater growth rate, it was obtained 38.9 g/L for 24 h, at 25°C using rotation rate at 125 rpm. The growing medium (conventional milk) supplemented with different minerals and vitamins may lead to improve the growth conditions of kefir grains biomass. The optimization of the growth environment is very important for achieving the maximum production of kefir grains biomass, substrate necessary to obtain the polysaccharide kefiran. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 45 (5 ULg)
See detailINFLUENCE OF DIMETHOXYMETHANE (DMM) ADDITION IN LIGHT FUEL OIL ON THE FLAME EMISSION IN A DOMESTIC HOT WATER BOILER
Tartari, Paula; Ngendakumana, Philippe ULg

Conference (2001, September)

In order to investigate the soot reduction potentialities of DMM (called also methylal) addition in an overall lean diffusion flame, tests have been carried out on our experimental fuel oil boiler fitted ... [more ▼]

In order to investigate the soot reduction potentialities of DMM (called also methylal) addition in an overall lean diffusion flame, tests have been carried out on our experimental fuel oil boiler fitted with a burner equipped with a spill-return atomiser. The tests have been performed in steady-state regime without and with DMM addition (4% on mass basis). The two firing rates (low and high firing rates) of the burner have been adjusted successively. The flame emission was recorded by means of a photodiode, sensible in the visible region of the wavelength spectrum. The axial profiles of the flame emission obtained show clearly that an addition of DMM in the fuel oil leads to a decrease in the flame emission and thus a soot reduction. The NOx and CO emissions (measured at the chimney) and the thermal efficiency of the boiler were not significantly affected. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence of dipole-dipole interactions on decoherence-free states
Damanet, François ULg; Martin, John ULg

Poster (2014, March 18)

Decoherence, known as the consequence of the coupling of any quan- tum system to its environment, causes information loss in the system and represents a major problem in the physical realization of quan ... [more ▼]

Decoherence, known as the consequence of the coupling of any quan- tum system to its environment, causes information loss in the system and represents a major problem in the physical realization of quan- tum computers [1]. Decoherence-Free States (DFS) are considered as a possible solution to this problem. A set of trapped cold atoms placed in a DFS state will be immune against decoherence due to sponta- neous emission. However, because of dipole-dipole interactions between atoms, induced dephasing effects are likely to destroy the coherence and drive the system out of its DFS [1-2]. In this work, we study nu- merically the dynamics of a set of two-level atoms initially in a DFS with respect to dissipative processes by solving the master equation in- cluding both dissipative dynamics and dipole dipole interactions. We focus our attention on the influence of dipolar coupling on the radiated energy rate and coherence of the system as in [3]. In particular, by av- eraging over many realizations of close randomly distributed atomic positions, we show the formation of a superradiant-like pulse and we study its properties as a function of the dipolar coupling strength. [1] D. A. Lidar & K. B. Whaley, Lectures Notes in Phys., Vol. 622, p83-120, Springer (2003). [2] M. Gross & S. Haroche, Physics reports 93, 301-396 (1982). [3] W. Feng, Y. Li & S. -Y. Zhu, arXiv :1302.0957. (2013). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 46 (9 ULg)
See detailInfluence of dipole-dipole interactions on the superradiant pulse
Damanet, François ULg; Martin, John ULg

Poster (2013, May 23)

Superradiance, known as the cooperative spontaneous emission of a directional light pulse by excited atoms placed in vacuum, has recently regained attention in the context of photon localization [1] and ... [more ▼]

Superradiance, known as the cooperative spontaneous emission of a directional light pulse by excited atoms placed in vacuum, has recently regained attention in the context of photon localization [1] and single photon cooperative emission [2]. The dissipative dynamics of the atoms is known to depend dramatically on the ratio between the typical inter-atomic distance and the atomic transition wavelength, notably because of dipole-dipole interactions [3]. In this work, we study the effects of these interactions on superradiance as in [4] by solving numerically the corresponding master equation. In particular, by averaging over many realizations of the randomly distributed atomic positions, we show that the decay of the radiated energy pulse height with the intensity of the dipolar coupling follows a power law. [1] E. Ackermans, A. Gero & R. Kaiser, Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 103602 (2008). [2] R. Friedberg & J. T. Manassah, J. Phys. B 43, 035501 (2010). [3] M. Gross & S. Haroche, Physics reports 93, 301-396 (1982). [4] B. Coffey & R. Friedberg, Phys. Rev. A 17, 1033 (1978). [less ▲]

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See detailINFLUENCE OF DISSOLVED MACROMOLECULES ON ADHERENCE OF PARTICULATE SOILS
Toure, Yetioman ULg; Sindic, Marianne ULg; Rouxhet, G. Paul

Conference (2013, June 12)

Polysaccharides, proteins, lipids and other biopolymers are the main components of food and pharmaceutical mixtures and may influence interactions at interfaces and thus fouling and cleaning. In this ... [more ▼]

Polysaccharides, proteins, lipids and other biopolymers are the main components of food and pharmaceutical mixtures and may influence interactions at interfaces and thus fouling and cleaning. In this study, quartz particles (10 to 30µm) were used as a model soil for examining the effect of dissolved proteins on the cleanability of substrates after soiling and drying. Glass and stainless steel pretreated by UV-Ozone (StSteel-UVO) were used as model hydrophilic substrates, while hydrophobic substrates were represented by stainless steel cleaned with ethanol (StSteel-Eth) and polystyrene. BSA and β-LGB were used as proteins. The quartz suspensions used for soiling (150g/L) were prepared in pure water and in a solution of each protein (8g/l). After soiling and drying, the cleanability was evaluated using a radial-flow cell, with pure water as the cleaning fluid. When soiling was made with a quartz suspension in pure water, the soil adherence increased with substrate hydrophilicity. This may be explained by better droplet spreading and increase of the capillary forces created upon drying. The presence of proteins in the suspension used for soiling hydrophilic substrates (Glass and StSteel-UVO), decreased the adherence of quartz particles. Its effect was less marked and tended to be opposite for less hydrophilic substrates (StSteel-Eth, Polystyrene). The comparison of different substrates and two proteins showed that the adherence cannot be explained by a simple relation with the contact angle. Other factors may be the solution surface tension itself and the protein behavior at the interfaces created by drying and by rehydratation during cleaning. When considering the influence of substrate on soiling, it must be kept in mind that high surface energy solids (metals, oxides) are readily contaminated in contact with air and lose their hydrophilicity. Amazingly this may improve the substrate behavior regarding cleanability with respect to particulate soil. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence of dissolved metals and oxidative degradation inhibitors on the oxidative and thermal degradation of monoethanolamine in post-combustion CO2 capture
Léonard, Grégoire ULg; Voice, Alexander; Toye, Dominique ULg et al

in Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Reseach (2014), 53(47), 18121

In the present work, the influence of metal ions and oxidative degradation inhibitors on the stability of monoethanolamine solvents (MEA) is studied. Solvent degradation induces additional costs and ... [more ▼]

In the present work, the influence of metal ions and oxidative degradation inhibitors on the stability of monoethanolamine solvents (MEA) is studied. Solvent degradation induces additional costs and impacts the environmental balance of the CO2 capture process as well as its efficiency. The two main degradation pathways of MEA are studied under accelerated conditions: oxidative degradation with continuous gas feed and thermal degradation in batch reactors. It is confirmed that metal ions (resulting from solvent impurities and wall leaching) enhance the oxidative degradation of MEA, while they do not impact its thermal degradation. Moreover, different oxidative degradation inhibitors are tested with varying results according to the inhibitor. It appears that at the selected concentration, radical scavengers like Inhibitor A and DMTD (2,5-dimercapto-1,3,4-thiadiazole) are more efficient than chelating agents like HEDP (1-hydroxyethylidene diphosphonic acid) at inhibiting oxidative degradation. Furthermore, attention must be paid to the influence of oxidative degradation inhibitors on the thermal degradation of MEA. Indeed, some inhibitors like DMTD, DTPA (diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid), and DTDP (3,3′-dithiodipropionic acid) appeared to decrease the MEA thermal stability, which cannot be accepted in industrial applications. Finally, a further drawback of DTPA is its high affinity for metal ions, leading to a more corrosive solution, so its use is not recommended for CO2 capture applications. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence of DMM addition in light fuel oil on the flame emission in a domestic hot water boiler
Masy, Cédric; Ngendakumana, Philippe ULg

Conference (2004, August)

In order to investigate the soot reduction potentialities of DMM (called also methylal) addition in an overall lean diffusion flame, tests have been carried out on our experimental fuel oil boiler whose ... [more ▼]

In order to investigate the soot reduction potentialities of DMM (called also methylal) addition in an overall lean diffusion flame, tests have been carried out on our experimental fuel oil boiler whose burner is equipped with a spill-return atomizer. The tests have been performed in steady state regime without and with addition of DMM. During all the tests, the oxygen at the chimney was kept constant (around 3%) by adjusting the position of the burner air damper and thus the air combustion mass flow rate. The combustion chamber has two quartz windows through which the flame emission was registered by using a photodiode sensible in visible range. Classical gas analysers were used to measure the CO and NOx concentrations at the chimney. DMM percentages up to 15% (by mass) have been tested. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence of DNA condensation state on transfection efficiency in DNA/polymer complexes: An AFM and DLS comparative study
Volcke, C.; Pirotton, S.; Grandfils, Christian ULg et al

in Journal of Biotechnology (2006), 125(1), 11-21

Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is used to describe the formation process of polymer/DNA complexes. Two main objectives of this research are presented. The first one is to apply AFM as an effective tool to ... [more ▼]

Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is used to describe the formation process of polymer/DNA complexes. Two main objectives of this research are presented. The first one is to apply AFM as an effective tool to analyse DNA molecules and different polycation/DNA complexes in order to evaluate their degree of condensation (size and shape). The other one is to search for a relationship between the condensation state of DNA and its transfection efficiency. In this study, linear methacrylate based polymers and globular SuperFect polymers are used in order to induce DNA condensation. Ternary complexes, composed of methacrylate based polymers and polyethylene glycol (PEG)-based copolymers, are also investigated. AFM allows us to confirm good condensation conditions and relate them (or not) to transfection efficiencies. These AFM results (obtained after drying in air) are compared with measurements deduced from Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) experiments performed in water. This comparison allowed us to identify the structural modifications resulting from deposition on the mica surface. (c) 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence of domestication process on immune response to repeated emersion stressors in Eurasian perch (Perca fluviatilis L.)
Douxfils, Jessica; Lambert, S; Mathieu, Cédric et al

in Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology. A : Comparative Physiology (2014), 173

Detailed reference viewed: 41 (2 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailInfluence of dominance relationships on the estimation of dominance variance with sire-dam subclass effects
Gengler, Nicolas ULg; VanVleck, L. D.; MacNeil, M. D. et al

in Journal of Animal Science (1997), 75(11), 2885-2891

Two data sets from the USDA Livestock and Range Research Laboratory mere analyzed to study dominance variance and the influence of dominance relationships. The first consisted of 4,155 birth weight (3,884 ... [more ▼]

Two data sets from the USDA Livestock and Range Research Laboratory mere analyzed to study dominance variance and the influence of dominance relationships. The first consisted of 4,155 birth weight (3,884 weaning weight) records of inbred USDA Line 1 Herefords. The second consisted of 8,065 birth weight (7,380 weaning weight) records from a line-cross experiment with five lines. Two models were used. Both included fixed effects of year-sex of calf and age of dam, and covariates for calving date, inbreeding of animal, and inbreeding of dam. For the second set, additional covariates were line composition and heterozygosity coefficients. Random effects were direct and maternal additive genetic, maternal permanent environment, sire-dam subclass, and residual. Model 1 considered sire-dam subclasses unrelated. Model 2 related sire-dam subclasses with a parental dominance relationship matrix. Variance components were estimated using REML. Differences between estimates with Model 1 and 2 were unimportant except for dominance variance. For the first data set, estimates with Model 2 of relative genetic direct and maternal variances, direct-maternal correlation, permanent environment, and dominance variances for birth weight were .35, .13, -.02, .03, and .25, respectively, and they were .39, .11, .04, .06 and .14 for the second data set. For weaning weight, the first data set estimates were .20, .15, -.37, .19, and .11, respectively, and they were .16, .20, -.07, .18, and .18 for the second data set. Changes, decreases and increases, in estimates of dominance variances may be due to increased information from relationships and family types other than full-sibs. The assumption of unrelated sire-dam subclasses might not be appropriate for estimation of dominance variance in populations with many dominance relationships among siredam classes. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence of dose on the persistence of conditioned place preference induced by cocaine in C57BL/6J mice
Brabant, Christian ULg; Tirelli, Ezio ULg

in Behavioural Pharmacology (2003, September), 14(Suppl. 1), 54

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See detailInfluence of drospirenone on renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system evaluation
VROONEN, Laurent ULg; Cavalier, Etienne ULg; Vranken, Laura ULg et al

in Endocrine Abstracts - 13th European Congress of Endocrinology (2011)

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See detailInfluence of drying and hydrothermal treatment of corn on the denaturation of salt-soluble proteins and color parameters
Odjo, Sylvanus; Malumba Kamba, Paul ULg; Dossou, Joseph et al

in Journal of Food Engineering (2012), 109(3), 561-570

The effect of heat treatments (drying and hydrothermal treatment) on the extractability of salt-soluble protein (SSP) was assessed using Promatest methodology for corn kernels heated between 60 C and 120 ... [more ▼]

The effect of heat treatments (drying and hydrothermal treatment) on the extractability of salt-soluble protein (SSP) was assessed using Promatest methodology for corn kernels heated between 60 C and 120 C. During drying, the evolution of the grain moisture content is fitted using the analytical solution of Fick equation developed by Crank (1979) for spherical material. The decrease of extractible salt-soluble protein during heating is forecasted using a first and a second order ordinary differential equation. It was found that temperature; moisture content and time of processing greatly influence the kinetic denaturation of SSP of corn kernels. The evolution of extractible SSP content of corn kernels during drying at high temperature is more correctly described with second order kinetic than with the first order kinetic reaction. The Hunterlab color parameters of corn also vary during drying. Lightness and color intensity decrease while yellowness, redness, chroma and hue angle increase through drying time. Most of these Hunterlab color parameters are highly correlated with the salt-soluble proteins content and therefore could be used as indicators of excessive heat treatment and denaturation of salt-soluble proteins in corn kernels [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence of drying and hydrothermal treatments on the denaturation of corn proteins
Odjo, Djosse Psijus Sylvanus ULg; Malumba Kamba, Paul ULg; Bera, François ULg

Poster (2013, February 08)

Corn (Zea mays L.) is the most abundant cereal grain produced in the world. It also provides a significant amount of protein in human and animal diets. During drying corn grains undergo several ... [more ▼]

Corn (Zea mays L.) is the most abundant cereal grain produced in the world. It also provides a significant amount of protein in human and animal diets. During drying corn grains undergo several alterations including protein denaturation. A series of studies have been conducted in order to understand mechanisms behind denaturation of corn proteins during drying and heat moisture treatments. Using a laboratory fluidized-bed dryer, a flint corn variety have been dried between 54° and 130°C and subjected to different analyses from a qualitative point of view with a sequential extraction of corn protein fractions and from a quantitative point of view with the modeling of salt-soluble proteins using Promatest assay. Albumin, globulin and zein solubilities dropped significantly when the drying temperature increased. The electrophoretic patterns of zein and glutelin-G1 were not significantly modified, although the solubility of zein was affected by the drying temperature. The analysis of the different protein group solubilities suggested that denaturation mechanisms other than the creation of new disulfide bonds occurred during the drying of corn at high temperature. The study of the effect of heat treatments on the extractability of salt-soluble proteins shows that temperature; moisture content and time of processing greatly influence their kinetic denaturation. Modeling of salt-soluble proteins reveals that the evolution of extractible salt-soluble proteins content of corn kernels during drying at high temperature is more correctly described with a second order kinetic reaction. Investigations continue in order to understand protein denaturation and influence in functional properties and end-use of corn protein-based products. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence of drying methods on yield and chemical composition
Dahak, K.; Wathelet, Jean-Paul ULg; Chechouani, H. et al

Poster (2009)

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See detailInfluence of drying temperature on functional properties of wet-milled starch granules
Malumba Kamba, Paul ULg; Massaux, Carine; Deroanne, Claude et al

in Carbohydrate Polymers (2009), 75

Relationships between swelling capacities, pasting properties, rotational flow behaviour and textural properties of hydro-thermally heated wet-milled starch granules from corn dried between 60 and 130°C ... [more ▼]

Relationships between swelling capacities, pasting properties, rotational flow behaviour and textural properties of hydro-thermally heated wet-milled starch granules from corn dried between 60 and 130°C were investigated. High-drying temperatures applied during the corn drying process conferred to the wet-milled starch granules (WSG) such a rigidity which reduced their swelling capacities, their water binding capacities and their water solubility index after gelatinization. These granules changes affected their pasting characteristics, their flow behaviour and several textural parameters of gel formed from the wet-milled starch granule after gelatinization. The rigidity of granules was a major factor determining the formation of either starch pastes or gels. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 97 (11 ULg)