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See detailMajor and trace element geochemistry in a peat core from North Poland.Preliminary results
De Vleeschouwer; Fagel, Nathalie ULg; Cherbukin et al

Poster (2007)

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See detailMajor changes in glucose metabolism, including new-onset diabetes, within 3 months after initiation of or switch to atypical antipsychotic medication in patients with schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder.
van Winkel, Ruud; De Hert, Marc; Wampers, Martien et al

in Journal of Clinical Psychiatry (2008), 69(3), 472-9

OBJECTIVE: To investigate 3-month changes in glucose metabolism in a naturalistic sample of patients with schizophrenia newly started on or switched to specific atypical antipsychotic medication therapy ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: To investigate 3-month changes in glucose metabolism in a naturalistic sample of patients with schizophrenia newly started on or switched to specific atypical antipsychotic medication therapy. METHOD: One hundred eighty-three patients were evaluated before initiation and 3 months after with a 75-g glucose load oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Data were collected between November 2003 and January 2007. RESULTS: Eight patients (4.4%) developed new-onset diabetes within 3 months. Initiation of clozapine resulted in a significantly higher risk for new-onset glucose abnormalities than initiation of aripiprazole (odds ratio = 67.29, 95% CI = 5.23 to 866.49). Significant drug x time interactions were found for all OGTT glucose assessments (fasting: F = 6.79, df = 5,177; p < .0001; 30 minutes: F = 3.89, df = 5,177; p = .0023; 60 minutes: F = 5.03, df = 5,177; p = .0002; 120 minutes: F = 3.78, df = 5,177; p = .0028), with the evolution of plasma glucose levels being significantly worse in patients initiated on clozapine therapy (fasting, 30 minutes, and 60 minutes), olanzapine therapy (fasting, 60 minutes, and 120 minutes), and quetiapine therapy (fasting and 60 minutes) than in patients initiated on aripiprazole therapy (p < .05). Clozapine was also significantly more deleterious than risperidone and amisulpride for fasting plasma glucose level changes (p < .05). Type of initiation (start or switch) did not affect any of the metabolic parameters. CONCLUSIONS: The incidence of new-onset glucose abnormalities, including diabetes, in the first 3 months after newly starting or switching atypical antipsychotic medication is high and may be markedly influenced by type of prescribed antipsychotic. The importance of accurately screening for new-onset glucose abnormalities after initiation of an atypical antipsychotic is emphasized. [less ▲]

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See detailMajor clinical outcomes in antiretroviral therapy (ART)-naive participants and in those not receiving ART at baseline in the SMART study.
Emery, Sean; Neuhaus, Jacqueline A; Phillips, Andrew N et al

in Journal of Infectious Diseases (2008), 197(8), 1133-44

BACKGROUND: The SMART study randomized 5,472 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients with CD4+ cell counts >350 cells/microL to intermittent antiretroviral therapy (ART; the drug conservation ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: The SMART study randomized 5,472 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients with CD4+ cell counts >350 cells/microL to intermittent antiretroviral therapy (ART; the drug conservation [DC] group) versus continuous ART (the viral suppression [VS] group). In the DC group, participants started ART when the CD4+ cell count was <250 cells/microL. Clinical outcomes in participants not receiving ART at entry inform the early use of ART. METHODS: Patients who were either ART naive (n=249) or who had not been receiving ART for >or= 6 months (n=228) were analyzed. The following clinical outcomes were assessed: (i) opportunistic disease (OD) or death from any cause (OD/death); (ii) OD (fatal or nonfatal); (iii) serious non-AIDS events (cardiovascular, renal, and hepatic disease plus non-AIDS-defining cancers) and non-OD deaths; and (iv) the composite of outcomes (ii) and (iii). RESULTS: A total of 477 participants (228 in the DC group and 249 in the VS group) were followed (mean, 18 months). For outcome (iv), 21 and 6 events occurred in the DC (7 in ART-naive participants and 14 in those who had not received ART for >or= 6 months) and VS (2 in ART-naive participants and 4 in those who had not received ART for 6 months) groups, respectively. Hazard ratios for DC vs. VS by outcome category were as follows: outcome (i), 3.47 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.26-9.56; p=.02); outcome (ii), 3.26 (95% CI, 1.04-10.25; p=.04); outcome (iii), 7.02 (95% CI, 1.57-31.38; p=.01); and outcome (iv), 4.19 (95% CI, 1.69-10.39; p=.002 ). CONCLUSIONS: Initiation of ART at CD4+ cell counts >350 cells/microL compared with <250 cells/microL may reduce both OD and serious non-AIDS events. These findings require validation in a large, randomized clinical trial. [less ▲]

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See detailMajor Decrease in the Incidence of Trisomy 21 at Birth in South Belgium: Mass Impact of Triple Test?
Verloes, Alain ULg; Gillerot, Y.; Van Maldergem, Lionel ULg et al

in European Journal of Human Genetics (2001), 9(1), 1-4

In South Belgium (Wallonia), the 'triple test' was introduced in 1990-1991, and is nowadays a widely accepted screening method for assessment of trisomy 21 risk in pregnancy. The 'triple test' is not ... [more ▼]

In South Belgium (Wallonia), the 'triple test' was introduced in 1990-1991, and is nowadays a widely accepted screening method for assessment of trisomy 21 risk in pregnancy. The 'triple test' is not regulated and can be freely performed by any biomedical lab, making epidemiological data unavailable. By contrast, cytogenetic investigations are limited to a few genetic centres, and accurate statistics can be easily built from their files. During the period 1984-1989, a total of 244 trisomy 21 (1/876 pregnancies) were diagnosed in the Genetic Centres of Liege and Loverval, 42 (17%) of them prenatally. During the period 1993-1998, 294 trisomy 21 (1/704 pregnancies) were observed, 165 (56%) of which prenatally, and more than 90% of affected pregnancies were terminated. Even after correction for late foetal loss of trisomic foetuses, the difference is highly significant, and corresponds to a theoretical shift in the incidence of trisomy 21 at birth from 1/794 to 1/1606. As no remarkable progress occurred in other non-invasive prenatal screening procedures or general health care policies in Belgium, the most reasonable explanation is the use on a large scale of triple test by pregnant women, and the election of termination for most affected pregnancies. [less ▲]

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See detailMajor element geochemistry of cumulates from the Bjerkreim-Sokndal layered intrusion (Norway)
Duchesne, Jean-Clair ULg; Charlier, Bernard ULg

in Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta (2004, June), 68(11, Suppl. S), 647

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See detailMajor histocompatibility complex class II expression by activated microglia caudal to lesions of descending tracts in the human spinal cord is not associated with a T cell response.
Schmitt, A. B.; Buss, A.; Breuer, S. et al

in Acta Neuropathologica (2000), 100(5), 528-36

Lesion-induced microglial/macrophage responses were investigated in post-mortem human spinal cord tissue of 20 patients who had died at a range of survival times after spinal trauma or brain infarction ... [more ▼]

Lesion-induced microglial/macrophage responses were investigated in post-mortem human spinal cord tissue of 20 patients who had died at a range of survival times after spinal trauma or brain infarction. Caudal to the spinal cord injury or brain infarction, a strong increase in the number of activated microglial cells was observed within the denervated intermediate grey matter and ventral horn of patients who died shortly after the insult (4-14 days). These cells were positive for the leucocyte common antigen (LCA) and for the major histocompatibility complex class II antigen (MHC II), with only a small proportion staining for the CD68 antigen. After longer survival times (1-4 months), MHC II-immunoreactivity (MHC II-IR) was clearly reduced in the grey matter but abundant in the white matter, specifically within the degenerating corticospinal tract, co-localising with CD68. In this fibre tract, elevated MHC II-IR and CD68-IR were still detectable 1 year after trauma or stroke. It is likely that the subsequent expression of CD68 on MHC II-positive microglia reflects the conversion to a macrophage phenotype, when cells are phagocytosing degenerating presynaptic terminals in grey matter target regions at early survival times and removing axonal and myelin debris in descending tracts at later survival times. No T or B cell invasion or involvement of co-stimulatory B7 molecules (CD80 and CD86) was observed. It is possible that the up-regulation of MHC II on microglia that lack the expression of B7 molecules may be responsible for the prevention of a T cell response, thus protecting the spinal cord from secondary tissue damage. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Major Homology Region Of Bovine Leukaemia Virus P24(Gag) Is Required For Virus Infectivity In Vivo
Willems, Luc ULg; Kerkhofs, P.; Attenelle, L. et al

in Journal of General Virology (1997), 78

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See detailMajor impairments of glutamatergic transmission and long term synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus of mice lacking the melanin-concentrating hormone receptor-1
Pachoud, Bastien; Adamantidis, Antoine ULg; Ravassard, Pascal et al

in Journal of Neurophysiology (2010), 104

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See detailThe major portal of entry of koi herpesvirus in cyprinus carpio is the skin.
Costes, Bérénice ULg; Stalin Raj, V.; Michel, Benjamin ULg et al

in Journal of Virology (2009)

Koi herpesvirus (KHV), recently designated in the species Cyprinid Herpesvirus 3, is the causative agent of a lethal disease in koi and common carp. In the present study, we investigated the portal of ... [more ▼]

Koi herpesvirus (KHV), recently designated in the species Cyprinid Herpesvirus 3, is the causative agent of a lethal disease in koi and common carp. In the present study, we investigated the portal of entry of KHV in carp using bioluminescence imaging. Taking profit of the recent cloning of the KHV genome as a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC), we produced a recombinant plasmid encoding a firefly luciferase (LUC) expression cassette inserted in the intergenic region between ORF 136 and ORF 137. Two viral strains were then reconstituted from the modified plasmid: the FL BAC 136 LUC excised strain and the FL BAC 136 LUC TK revertant strain encoding a disrupted and a wild-type thymidine kinase (TK) locus, respectively. In vitro, the two recombinant strains replicated comparably to the parental FL strain. The FL BAC 136 LUC TK revertant strain was shown in vitro to induce a bioluminescent signal allowing the detection of single positive cells as early as 24 hours post-infection; while in vivo, it induced KHV infection in carp that was indistinguishable from that induced by the parental FL strain. To identify the KHV portal of entry, carp were analyzed by bioluminescence imaging at different time post-infection with the FL BAC 136 LUC TK revertant strain. These analyses demonstrated that the skin of the fish, covering the fins and also the body, is the major portal of entry of KHV in carp. Finally, to further demonstrate the role of the skin as the KHV portal of entry, we constructed an original system nicknamed "U-tube" to perform per-cutaneous infection restricted to the posterior part of the fish. All the data obtained in the present study demonstrate that the skin and not the gills is the major portal of entry of KHV in carp. [less ▲]

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See detailA major quantitative trait locus for cadmium tolerance in Arabidopsis halleri colocalizes with HMA4, a gene encoding a heavy metal ATPase
Courbot, M.; Willems, G.; Motte, Patrick ULg et al

in Plant Physiology (2007), 144(2), 1052-1065

Cadmium (Cd) tolerance seems to be a constitutive species-level trait in Arabidopsis halleri sp. halleri. Therefore, an interspecific cross was made between A. halleri and its closest nontolerant ... [more ▼]

Cadmium (Cd) tolerance seems to be a constitutive species-level trait in Arabidopsis halleri sp. halleri. Therefore, an interspecific cross was made between A. halleri and its closest nontolerant interfertile relative, Arabidopsis lyrata sp. petraea, and a first-generation backcross population (BC1) was used to map quantitative trait loci (QTL) for Cd tolerance. Three QTL were identified, which explained 43%, 24%, and 16% of the phenotypic variation in the mapping population. Heavy metal transporting ATPases4 (HMA4), encoding a predicted heavy metal ATPase, colocalized with the peak of the major QTL Cdtol-1 and was consequently further studied. HMA4 transcripts levels were higher in the roots and the shoots of A. halleri than in A. lyrata sp. petraea. Furthermore, HMA4 was also more highly expressed in all BC1 genotypes harboring the HMA4 A. halleri allele at the QTL Cdtol-1, independently of the presence of an A. halleri allele at the two other QTL. Overexpression of AhHMA4 in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) supported a role of HMA4 in zinc (Zn) and Cd transport by reducing the Cd and Zn contents of the yeast cells. In epidermal tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) cells, AhHMA4:green fluorescent protein was clearly localized in the plasma membrane. Taken together, all available data point to the elevated expression of HMA4P(1B)-type ATPase as an efficient mechanism for improving Cd/ Zn tolerance in plants under conditions of Cd/ Zn excess by maintaining low cellular Cd2+ and Zn2+ concentrations in the cytoplasm. [less ▲]

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See detailMajoration de loyer et bail de logement social: "Ceci n'est pas une clause pénale"
Delforge, Cécile ULg

in Journal des Juges de Paix = Tijdschrift van de Vrederecters (2012)

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See detailLa majoration des quotités insaisissables pour enfant à charge
Georges, Frédéric ULg

in Actualités du Droit (2003)

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See detailLa majorité des sièges sans la majorité de voix : une aubaine pour les indépendantistes flamands?
Bouhon, Frédéric ULg

Article for general public (2011)

The Belgian electoral system leads to the overrepresentation of the larger political parties. With 39% of the votes, the N-VA could obtain 41 seats on 87.

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See detailLa majorité politique : Étude des débats parlementaires sur la fixation d'un seuil
Fournier, Bernard ULg; Pépratx, Franck

in Percheron, Annick; Rémond, René (Eds.) Age et politique (1991)

Depuis la Révolution française, les seuils électoraux et les seuils d'éligibilité ont beaucoup varié en France. Par l'analyse des débats parlementaires, cet article retrace les raisons évoquées pour ... [more ▼]

Depuis la Révolution française, les seuils électoraux et les seuils d'éligibilité ont beaucoup varié en France. Par l'analyse des débats parlementaires, cet article retrace les raisons évoquées pour justifier ces changements. [less ▲]

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See detailMajoron emission in muon and tau decays revisited
Hirsch, M.; Vicente, Avelino ULg; Meyer, J. et al

in Physical Review. D, Particles, Fields, Gravitation, and Cosmology (2009), 79

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See detailMaking and transforming art : changes in artists’ materials and practice
Neven, Sylvie ULg; Dubois, Hélène; Eyb-Green, Sigrid et al

Book published by Archetype Publications (in press)

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See detailMaking Progress in People-centred Care: Country Experiences and Lessons Learnt
Montenegro, H; Ramagem, C; Kawar, R et al

in International Journal of Person-Centered Medicine (2012), 2(1), 64-72

Orienting healthcare towards people-centred primary care is one of the four policy directions for the renewal of primary healthcare outlined in the World Health Report 2008, Primary Health Care: Now More ... [more ▼]

Orienting healthcare towards people-centred primary care is one of the four policy directions for the renewal of primary healthcare outlined in the World Health Report 2008, Primary Health Care: Now More than Ever - along with universal coverage, health in all policies and more inclusive health governance. During the Fourth Geneva Conference on Person- centred Medicine, WHO organized a session on policies and health system interventions that help make care more people- centred. Case studies from Chile, New Zealand, Spain (Basque Region) and Uganda illustrated that the implementation of people-centred care (PCC) varies greatly across countries. Despite these variations, three key lessons emerge. First - efforts to make care more people-centred may more likely succeed when they are linked to or are part of other major drivers of change such as improving equity in health, establishing rights or addressing chronic diseases. Second - such efforts tend to be long-term processes that require sustained political will and leadership as well as consistency over time. Top-down, supply-driven reforms need to be complemented with bottom-up, demand-driven measures to facilitate change. Third - participation of all interested parties (policy-makers, providers and users) as well as other sectors is vital for ensuring success. The case studies suggest that people-centred care is more likely to succeed when it is implemented using system- wide approaches that make use of multiple policy instruments intervening at different levels while guaranteeing sustainable financing and alignment of financial incentives. [less ▲]

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See detailMaking sense of the Chaos: Model-based CVS monitoring and decision support in critical care
Shaw, G. M.; Chase, J. G.; Hann, C. E. et al

in Proceedings of the NZ Physiological Society 2008 Medical Science Congress (MedSci 2008) (2008)

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