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See detailImpact of a one-day preventive voice program for teachers : A longitudinal study
Remacle, Angélique ULg; Gerber, Silvain; David, Claire et al

Conference (2015, September 02)

I. INTRODUCTION Teachers are professional voice users, i.e. people who rely on a consistent, special, or appealing voice quality to achieve their job. If afflicted with dysphonia or aphonia, they would ... [more ▼]

I. INTRODUCTION Teachers are professional voice users, i.e. people who rely on a consistent, special, or appealing voice quality to achieve their job. If afflicted with dysphonia or aphonia, they would generally loose motivation at work and seek alternative employment [1]. Teachers represent the largest group of professionals complaining of dysphonia: they represent 20% to 25% of the treatment-seeking workers [2, 3]. Voice disorders impact both physical and psychological health. They represent a public health problem, since they have considerable economic consequences in terms of treatment and replacement of professionals who suffer from these problems [4]. Moreover, they have been shown to interfere with quality of life, emotional state, job satisfaction, performance and attendance [4, 5]. Finally, a teacher’s dysphonia adversely impacts students’ comprehension and learning [6]. These negative effects of teachers’ voice disorders motivate to develop prevention programs and test their efficacy. This study aims to evaluate the impact over a five-month period of a one-day prevention program for female teachers. This program includes both direct and indirect methods. II. METHODS A. Participants Twenty-two female kindergarten and elementary schoolteachers with less than 5 years of experience participated in this study. Half of them (test group) took part in a one-day prevention program in October, while the other half (control group) received no counseling on the use of the voice. B. Assessments For each participant, five sustained /a/ vowels and the reading of a text were recorded (1) at two times of the workday (morning and evening), and (2) at three times of the year: October (T0), December (T1) and February (T2). For the sustained vowels, we measured maximum phonation time (MPT), mean fundamental frequency (F0), values of jitter, shimmer and harmonics-to-noise ratio (HNR). For the texts, we measured mean F0, standard deviation in F0 and intensity, and parameters related to speech rate (number of syllables per second, number of pauses and mean duration of pauses). For each parameter, a repeated-measures ANOVA (2 groups * 2 times of day * 3 times of year) was carried out. Participants also completed a questionnaire on voice use and comfort at the three test sessions. III. RESULTS A. Time of day effect The main effect of time of day showed an increase in the mean F0 of the vowels and the text following a workday (p<.01). MPT and HNR also increased (p<.01), while jitter and shimmer decreased at the end of the day (p<.05). The speech rate measures showed that the teachers tended to pause less often while reading the text at the end of the day, and their pauses were shorter (p<.05). B. Time of year effect The main effect of time of year showed an increase in the mean F0 of the vowels and the text during the year (p<.01), with the highest values observed in December (T1). The speech rate measures also showed an increase in the number of syllables per second (p<.01) and a tendency for speakers to pause less often later in the year. C. Group effect Several acoustic parameters showed that voice changed during the day and during the year in significantly different ways in the two groups. Thus, the MPT increased more during the year for the control group than for the test group. The elevation of mean F0 during the day increased to a similar degree for both groups between T0 and T1, but continued to increase until T2 for the control group, while it decreased for the test group. Jitter and shimmer decreased significantly following a workday for both groups at T0, and this decrease was more marked for the test group at T1 and T2. Finally, analysis of the questionnaires showed a very strong deterioration in teachers’ self-evaluations of vocal comfort and control at T1; nevertheless there were significantly fewer complaints from the group that received the prevention program. IV. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION For both groups, the changes in the observed parameters suggested an increase in vocal fatigue and hyperfunctional phonation during the day and during the year. The results showed greater vocal deterioration in December than at the other points in the school year (October and February). For several acoustic parameters, the comparison of the two groups showed a less severe vocal deterioration for subjects who received the preventive program. Moreover, the questionnaires showed that the prevention program had a significantly positive impact on the changes in the teachers’ perception during the year. These results encourage to offer such preventive interventions to teachers before or during their career, since they have a positive impact on teachers’ perception and vocal comfort. V. REFERENCES [1] Titze IR, Lemke J, Montequin D. (1997). Populations in the U.S. workforce who rely on voice as a primary tool of trade: A preliminary report. Journal of Voice, 11(3), 254-259. [2] Van Houtte, E., Van Lierde, K., D'Haeseleer, E., & Claeys, S. (2010). The prevalence of laryngeal pathology in a treatment-seeking population with dysphonia. Laryngoscope, 120(2), 306-312. [3] Remacle, A., Petitfils, C., Lejeune, L., Finck, C., & Morsomme, D. (2014). Quel est le profil professionnel des patients consultant en phoniatrie ? 70e Congrès de la Société Française de Phoniatrie, Paris, France. (October 13, 2014). [4] Roy, N., Merrill, R. M., Thibeault, S., Parsa, R. A., Gray, S. D., & Smith, E. M. (2004). Prevalence of voice disorders in teachers and the general population. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 47(2), 281-293. [5] Chen, S. H., Chiang, S.-C., Chung, Y.-M., Hsiao, L.-C., & Hsiao, T.-Y. (2010). Risk factors and effects of voice problems for teachers. Journal of Voice, 24(2), 183-190. [6] Morsomme, D., Minel, L., & Verduyckt, I. (2011). Impact of teachers’ voice quality on children’s language processing skills. Vocologie: Stem en Stemstoornissen, 4, 9-15. [less ▲]

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See detailImpact of abiotic and biotic factors on VOC emissions and protein expression in Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh
Hien, Truong Thi Dieu ULg

Doctoral thesis (2014)

The interaction of Arabidopsis and environmental factors is a model system used to study stress response in plants, in particular the analysis of the emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and the ... [more ▼]

The interaction of Arabidopsis and environmental factors is a model system used to study stress response in plants, in particular the analysis of the emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and the proteomic expression. In the present thesis, VOC emissions and expression of proteins were studied in the response of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh to the interaction of abiotic (temperature or water stress) and biotic (adults Myzus persicae (Sulzer) or Plutella xylostella (L.) larvae) factors. To achieve these objectives, the volatile profiles emission of Arabidopsis was previously evaluated by headspace solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME) coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The experimental conditions were maintained for different periods, and the emission profile for each period was determined. Our main findings were as follows: (1) the combined aphids (M. persicae) and temperature stress treatments induced more complex plant volatile profiles than did single stress. Rising in temperatures (17, 22, and 27 °C) led to significant increases of isothiocyanate (ITC), nitrile, and sulfide proportions in aphid-infested Arabidopsis plants; (2) aphid-infested water-stressed Arabidopsis exhibited significant changes in their VOC emission blends with modification of sulfide, ITC, ketones, aldehyde, and terpenes; and (3) the molecule profiles from P. xylostella-infested plants also varied with infestation time and temperature treatment. The larvae-infested Arabidopsis at 22 °C emitted sulfides and nitrile instead of ITCs as it is the case at 17 and 27 °C. Additionally, a proteomic approach using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) coupled with mass spectrometry was performed to examine the protein changes in Arabidopsis responses to herbivorous insects under controlled conditions. A total of 574 and 454 protein spots were reproducibly detected by bidimensional electrophoresis. After M. persicae and P. xylostella infestations 31 and 18 protein spots were differently expressed in their relative abundance, respectively. Sixteen proteins were successfully identified by MALDI-TOF MS and LC-ESI-MS/MS. Functional analysis of identified proteins showed that they were associated with a large number of biological processes, namely carbohydrate, amino acid, lipid and energy metabolism, photosynthesis, defense and translation process. The expression of such proteins in A. thaliana leaves was either up-regulated or down-regulated according to insect feeding stresses. Taken together, the original reported results provide evidences that the interaction between abiotic and biotic stress factors has great ability to alter the profile of VOCs as well as proteins in A. thaliana plants. It provides valuable new insights to explore the complex response of plants to multiple simultaneous factors. [less ▲]

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See detailImpact of abiotic stresses on volatile organic compound production of field crops and grasslands
Digrado, Anthony ULg; Mozaffar, Ahsan ULg; Bachy, Aurélie ULg et al

Poster (2014, February 07)

Abiotic and biotic stresses are known to alter biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emission from plants. With the climate and global change, BVOC emissions are likely to increase. This increase on ... [more ▼]

Abiotic and biotic stresses are known to alter biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emission from plants. With the climate and global change, BVOC emissions are likely to increase. This increase on BVOC emissions could be driven by many environmental parameters like temperature, ozone and light availability for photosynthesis although it is still difficult to predict the impact of some environmental parameters, environmental controls on BVOC emission being species and BVOC-dependent. These BVOC are involved in a wide range of interactions of plants with their environment and these interactions could be affected by the global change. Moreover, BVOC also play a key role in the atmospheric chemistry and may contribute to ozone formation and an increase in methane lifetime, strengthening the global change. Yet, due to technical limitation, there are few studies examining the impact of multiple co-occurring stresses on BVOC emission at the ecosystem level although stress combination is probably more ecologically realistic in field. In the CROSTVOC (for CROp STress VOC) project, the impact of abiotic stresses (e.g. heat, drought, ozone and grazing) on BVOC emission will be investigated for field crops (maize and wheat) and grassland both at the ecosystem and plant scale. [less ▲]

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See detailImpact of acid containing montmorillonite on the properties of Nafion® membranes
Thomassin, Jean-Michel ULg; Pagnoulle, Christophe; Caldarella, Giuseppe ULg et al

in Polymer (2005), 46(25), 11389-11395

The counter-ions of montmorillonite have been exchanged for ammonium cations containing either a sulfonic acid or a carboxylic acid in order to improve the performances of sulfonated membranes in direct ... [more ▼]

The counter-ions of montmorillonite have been exchanged for ammonium cations containing either a sulfonic acid or a carboxylic acid in order to improve the performances of sulfonated membranes in direct methanol fuel cell. These layered silicates have been dispersed within Nafion® by solution mixing. Comparison with conventional organo-modified montmorillonite (Cloisite 30B) shows that the incorporation of carboxylic acid in the clay galleries improves the filler dispersion and, consequently, the methanol barrier properties. Moreover, the negative impact of Cloisite 30B on the ionic conductivity is restricted. [less ▲]

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See detailImpact of acid containing montmorillonite on the properties of sulfonated fuel cell membranes
Thomassin, Jean-Michel ULg; Pagnoulle, Christophe; Calderalla, G. et al

Poster (2005, May 11)

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See detailImpact of acute cadmium exposure on the trunk lateral line neuromasts and consequences on the "C-start" response behaviour of the sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax L.; Teleostei, Moronidae).
Faucher, Karine ULg; Fichet, Denis; Miramand, Pierre et al

in Aquatic Toxicology (2006), 76(3-4), 278-94

Behavioural responses of sea bass Dicentrarchus labrax were investigated after exposure to cadmium ions in laboratory-controlled conditions. The aim of this study was to discover whether environmental ... [more ▼]

Behavioural responses of sea bass Dicentrarchus labrax were investigated after exposure to cadmium ions in laboratory-controlled conditions. The aim of this study was to discover whether environmental exposure to cadmium ions inactivates fish lateral line system neuromasts, and to determine the behavioural consequences of such a sensory blockage. For this, fish escape behaviour in response to an artificial water jet was recorded using a 25-frames s(-1) analog video camera before and after cadmium exposure. Experimental set up was tested with fish whose lateral line system was artificially inactivated by antibiotics (gentamicin and streptomycin). Histological analyses with scanning electron microscopy showed antibiotic treatment destroyed lateral line system neuromasts. In addition, these fish did not respond to stimulations provoked by the water jet after antibiotic treatment. Fish escape behaviour was then recorded before and after cadmium exposure at two different concentrations. When fish were exposed to the first concentration of cadmium tested (0.5 microg l(-1), which represents the maximal cadmium concentration encountered in contaminated estuaries), no alteration in neuromast tissue was observed. In addition, before cadmium exposure, fish responded positively in 98.41 +/- 4.95% of lateral line system stimulations (escape behaviour in response to the water jet). After cadmium exposure, no behavioural modification could be detected: the fish responded positively in 95.16 +/- 9.79% of stimulations (chi(2) = 2.464, p = 0.116). In contrast, the high cadmium concentration used (5 microg l(-1), which represents 10 times the concentration occurring in highly polluted estuarine areas) involved severe neuromast tissue damage. Just after such cadmium exposure, fish showed only 41.67 +/- 35.36% of positive responses to their lateral line system stimulations, while they responded positively in 95.93 +/- 9.10% of stimulations under control conditions (chi(2) = 24.562, p < 0.0001). Their lateral line system neuromasts seemed to regenerate about 1 month after cadmium exposure. Associated with this regeneration, from the 21st day after cadmium exposure, their escape behaviour had recovered and was not significantly different from that recorded under control conditions (86.74 +/- 20.82%, chi(2) = 2.876, p = 0.090). This study shows that although 5 microg l(-1) cadmium is able to damage lateral line system neuromasts and causes fish behavioural alterations, fish exposed to 0.5 microg l(-1) cadmium displayed neither tissue neuromast nor behavioural modification. [less ▲]

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See detailThe impact of AGB stars on the chemical evolution of globular clusters
Jehin, Emmanuel ULg; Magain, Pierre ULg; Neuforge, Corinne et al

in Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars (1998)

We have analyzed high resolution and high signal-to-noise spectra of about 20 metal-poor stars. The correlations between the relative abundances of 16 elements have been studied, with a special emphasis ... [more ▼]

We have analyzed high resolution and high signal-to-noise spectra of about 20 metal-poor stars. The correlations between the relative abundances of 16 elements have been studied, with a special emphasis on the neutron-capture ones. This analysis reveals the existence of two sub-populations of field halo stars, namely Pop IIa and Pop IIb. They differ by the behaviour of the s-process elements versus the alpha and r-process elements. We present a scenario for the formation of these stars, which closely relates the origin of field halo stars to the evolution of globular clusters. According to this scenario, the two sub-populations originate from two different stages in the globular cluster's chemical evolution. In the first stage, the massive stars of the globular cluster's first stellar generation evolve, ending their lives as supernovae and ejecting alpha-elements and r-process elements into the interstellar medium. A second generation of stars forms out of this enriched ISM. In the second stage, the intermediate mass stars reach the end of the main sequence and the AGB stage, ejecting s-elements into the ISM through stellar winds or superwinds events. The matter released in the ISM by the AGB stars will be accreted by the lower-mass stars, enriching those stars in s-elements and accounting for PopIIb stars. We calculate the rates of interstellar gas production by stellar winds and the rates of gas accretion to estimate the changes in the globular cluster stars abundances. We compare those results to our observations. [less ▲]

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See detailImpact of age and breed on incidence of clinical signs after natural infection with bluetongue virus serotype 8 in sheep
Kirschvink, N.; Leemans, J.; Bolkerts, B. et al

Conference (2010, June)

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See detailImpact of Age and Treatment Group in Childhood High Hyperdiploid Low Risk B-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL): Results of the CLG-EORTC 58951 Study
Clement, Laura; Suciu, Stefan; Luquet, Isabelle et al

in Blood (2016)

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See detailImpact of ageing and food additives on the physico-chemical properties of partially hydrolyzed and pregelatinized rice flour
Mertens, Cécile ULg; Blecker, Christophe ULg

Poster (2010, August 25)

Conservation of the quality of a food product is an essential preoccupation for industrials. Indeed, food acceptability by consummers depends of this quality. However, the latter decreases with time of ... [more ▼]

Conservation of the quality of a food product is an essential preoccupation for industrials. Indeed, food acceptability by consummers depends of this quality. However, the latter decreases with time of storage, due to complex alteration reactions. This study presents a first approach of alteration reactions in a particular range of products: drum-dried pregelatinized cereal products. While this type of product is widely used as thickeners or in infant foods, no study has ever been made on the subject. The cereal studied here is one of the most consumed by mankind: rice. We also investigated the impact of food additives (E170 & E340ii) on the ageing of such a product, because they are often used empirically in industry. [less ▲]

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See detailThe impact of ageing on episodic memory encoding: an fMRI study
François, Sarah ULg; Angel, Lucie; Salmon, Eric ULg et al

Poster (2015, May 28)

It is now commonly accepted that a decline in episodic memory is observed with ageing: while recollection processes are impaired, familiarity seems to be relatively preserved (a). Older individuals appear ... [more ▼]

It is now commonly accepted that a decline in episodic memory is observed with ageing: while recollection processes are impaired, familiarity seems to be relatively preserved (a). Older individuals appear to recruit prefrontal areas bilaterally when their encoding is successful, while in young adults this activation is found to be left-lateralized (b). In this study, we were interested in the differences between younger and older participant regarding cerebral activity during encoding depending on whether the item elicited recollection or familiarity during the recognition phase. Twenty young volunteers (aged 19 to 29 years old) and 19 older volunteers (aged 60 to 78 years old) were presented visual stimuli depicting objects. During a first fMRI session, they were asked to make a size judgement about them. Then, in a second phase, the subjects were shown the items previously encountered during the encoding phase, as well as distractors. Participants' task was to determine which one were new and which one were seen earlier. For the latter, they also performed a Remember-Know judgement. Data were analysed using SPM8, with an event design comparing modifications in cerebral activity between the two subjects groups during encoding (1) for the items leading to recollection during the recognition phase compared to those leading to familiarity, and (2) for the items associated with familiarity during the recognition phase compared to those which were not recognized. Results show that older adults display a heightened activity in the right middle frontal gyrus, medial cingulate and paracingulate left gyri as well as in the precuneus, bilaterally when they engage recollection processes. Given that activations in these areas did not correlate with performance, they could be interepreted either as dedifferentiation or as an attempt of the ageing brain to compensate for a less elaborate encoding. However, no increase of activity was associated with familiarity processes in older adults, possibly because they are less demanding regarding attentional resources. (a) Bugaiska, A., Clarys, D., Jarry, C., Taconnat, L., Tapia, G., Vanneste, S., & Isingrini, M. (2007). The effect of aging in recollective experience: the processing speed and executive functioning hypothesis. Consciousness and Cognition, 16(4), 797-808. doi: 10.1016/j.concog.2006.11.007 (b) Duverne, S., Motamedinia, S., & Rugg, M. D. (2009). The relationship between aging, performance, and the neural correlates of successful memory encoding. Cerebral Cortex, 19(3), 733-744. doi:10.1093/cercor/bhn122 [less ▲]

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See detailThe impact of ageing on episodic memory encoding: an fMRI study
François, Sarah ULg; Angel, Lucie; SALMON, Eric ULg et al

Poster (2015, September 04)

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See detailThe impact of ageing on episodic memory encoding: an fMRI study
François, Sarah ULg; Angel, Lucie; Salmon, Eric ULg et al

Poster (2015, May 21)

It is now commonly accepted that a decline in episodic memory is observed with ageing: while recollection processes are impaired, familiarity seems to be relatively preserved (a). Older individuals appear ... [more ▼]

It is now commonly accepted that a decline in episodic memory is observed with ageing: while recollection processes are impaired, familiarity seems to be relatively preserved (a). Older individuals appear to recruit prefrontal areas bilaterally when their encoding is successful, while in young adults this activation is found to be left-lateralized (b). In this study, we were interested in the differences between younger and older participant regarding cerebral activity during encoding depending on whether the item elicited recollection or familiarity during the recognition phase. Twenty young volunteers (aged 19 to 29 years old) and 19 older volunteers (aged 60 to 78 years old) were presented visual stimuli depicting objects. During a first fMRI session, they were asked to make a size judgement about them. Then, in a second phase, the subjects were shown the items previously encountered during the encoding phase, as well as distractors. Participants' task was to determine which one were new and which one were seen earlier. For the latter, they also performed a Remember-Know judgement. Data were analysed using SPM8, with an event design comparing modifications in cerebral activity between the two subjects groups during encoding (1) for the items leading to recollection during the recognition phase compared to those leading to familiarity, and (2) for the items associated with familiarity during the recognition phase compared to those which were not recognized. Results show that older adults display a heightened activity in the right middle frontal gyrus, medial cingulate and paracingulate left gyri as well as in the precuneus, bilaterally when they engage recollection processes. Amongst those regions, the precuneus seems to underlie compensatory processes, allowing the elderly to perform a richer encoding, as it was previously suggested for recollection processes during recall (c). However, no increase in activity was associated with familiarity processes in older adults, possibly because they are less demanding regarding attentional resources. (a) Bugaiska, A., Clarys, D., Jarry, C., Taconnat, L., Tapia, G., Vanneste, S., & Isingrini, M. (2007). The effect of aging in recollective experience: the processing speed and executive functioning hypothesis. Consciousness and Cognition, 16(4), 797-808. doi: 10.1016/j.concog.2006.11.007 (b) Duverne, S., Motamedinia, S., & Rugg, M. D. (2009). The relationship between aging, performance, and the neural correlates of successful memory encoding. Cerebral Cortex, 19(3), 733-744. doi:10.1093/cercor/bhn122 (c) Angel, L., Bastin, C., Genon, S., Balteau, E., Phillips, C., Luxen, A., . . . Collette, F. (2013). Differential effects of aging on the neural correlates of recollection and familiarity. Cortex, 49(6), 1585-1597. doi:10.1016/j.cortex.2012.10.002 [less ▲]

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See detailThe impact of aging and hearing status on verbal short-term memory
Verhaegen, Clémence ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg; Majerus, Steve ULg

in Aging, Neuropsychology and Cognition (2013)

The aim of this study is to assess the impact of hearing status on age-related decrease in verbal short-term memory (STM) performance. This was done by administering a battery of verbal STM tasks to ... [more ▼]

The aim of this study is to assess the impact of hearing status on age-related decrease in verbal short-term memory (STM) performance. This was done by administering a battery of verbal STM tasks to elderly and young adult participants matched for hearing thresholds, as well as to young normal-hearing control participants. The matching procedure allowed us to assess the importance of hearing loss as an explanatory factor of age-related STM decline. We observed that elderly participants and hearing-matched young participants showed equal levels of performance in all verbal STM tasks, and performed overall lower than the normal hearing young control participants. This study provides evidence for recent theoretical accounts considering reduced hearing level as an important explanatory factor of poor auditory-verbal STM performance in older adults. [less ▲]

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See detailThe impact of aging and hearing status on verbal short-term memory
Verhaegen, Clémence ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg; Majerus, Steve ULg

Conference (2012, May)

We determined the impact of hearing status on age-related effects on verbal short-term memory (STM). Rabbit (1991) observed that elderly participants with hearing loss show impaired STM; he suggested that ... [more ▼]

We determined the impact of hearing status on age-related effects on verbal short-term memory (STM). Rabbit (1991) observed that elderly participants with hearing loss show impaired STM; he suggested that in the case of hearing loss, attentional resources had to be recruited to a larger extent to stimulus perception, reducing the available pool of attentional resources for STM processing. We tested this hypothesis by distinguishing the impact of aging from the impact of hearing status on STM. This was done by administering different verbal STM tasks to elderly and young adult participants matched for hearing threshold, as well as normal-hearing control participants. We observed that elderly participants and hearing-matched young participants showed equal levels of performance in all verbal STM tasks, and performed overall more poorly than the normal-hearing young control participants. These results suggest that mild hearing impairment is a major explanatory factor of reduced STM performance, and importantly, is age-independent. The results are discussed within an interactive framework of STM and attentional processing (Majerus et al., 2009). [less ▲]

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See detailThe impact of aging and hearing status on verbal working memory
Verhaegen, Clémence ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg; Majerus, Steve ULg

in Neuropsychology, Development, and Cognition. Section B, Aging, Neuropsychology and Cognition (2014), 21(4), 464-482

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See detailThe impact of aging on associative memory for pre-existing unitized associations
Delhaye, Emma ULg; Bastin, Christine ULg

in Neuropsychology, Development, and Cognition. Section B, Aging, Neuropsychology and Cognition (2016)

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See detailImpact of aging technique and muscle on oxidative stability of beef packaged under high-oxygen atmosphere
Didimo Imazaki, Pedro Henrique ULg; Tahiri, Assia ULg; Thimister, Jacqueline ULg et al

Poster (2014, October 17)

Two common approaches for beef aging are wet-aging and carcass-aging. Wet-aging refers to meat aged in a sealed vacuum package at refrigerated temperatures, while carcass aged at controlled temperatures ... [more ▼]

Two common approaches for beef aging are wet-aging and carcass-aging. Wet-aging refers to meat aged in a sealed vacuum package at refrigerated temperatures, while carcass aged at controlled temperatures and humidity is defined as carcass-aging. Carcass-aging is an ancient process used nowadays to produce beef characterized by its superior quality. The meat conservability is influenced by its sensitivity to oxidative process which can vary from one muscle to another. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of aging technique (wet-aging vs. carcass-aging), muscle (longissimus dorsi vs. rectus femoris) and previous vacuum storage time on colour and lipid stability of beef packaged in high-oxygen atmosphere. After a seven-day wet- or carcass-aging step, longissimus dorsi and rectus femoris muscle cuts from 4 Belgian Blue cows were vacuum packaged and stored at −1 °C for up to 28 days. At different times, part of these samples was repackaged under modified atmosphere – 70 % O2:30 % CO2 –, and stored during 7 days at +4 °C in order to simulate retail conditions. The following parameters were evaluated: colour (CIE L*a*b*), metmyoglobin %, lipid oxidation (TBARS), antioxidant enzyme activities (catalase, glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase), alpha-tocopherol and fat content. The sensitivity of high-oxygen atmosphere repacked meat cuts to oxidation was influenced by the aging technique (wet > carcass conditions), muscle (rectus femoris > longissimus dorsi) and length of the vacuum storage. Oxidation stability could be associated with muscle catalase activity, and no association could be established with the alpha-tocopherol content. [less ▲]

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