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See detailIFFT-equivariant quantizations
Boniver, Fabien; Mathonet, Pierre ULg

in Journal of Geometry and Physics (2006), 56(4), 712-730

The existence and uniqueness of quantizations that are equivariant with respect to conformal and projective Lie algebras of vector fields were recently obtained by Duval, Lecomte and Ovsienko. In order to ... [more ▼]

The existence and uniqueness of quantizations that are equivariant with respect to conformal and projective Lie algebras of vector fields were recently obtained by Duval, Lecomte and Ovsienko. In order to do so, they computed spectra of some Casimir operators. We give an explicit formula for those spectra in the general framework of IFFT-algebras classified by Kobayashi and Nagano. We also define tree-like subsets of eigenspaces of those operators in which eigenvalues can be compared to show the existence of IFFT-equivariant quantizations. We apply our results to prove the existence and uniqueness of quantizations that are equivariant with respect to the infinitesimal action of the symplectic (resp. pseudo-orhogonal) group on the symplectic (resp. pseudo-orthogonal) Grassmann manifold. [less ▲]

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See detailIFN gamma inhibits IL-8 production by IL-1bêta and TNFalpha stimulated human chondrocytes
Henrotin, Yves ULg; Zheng, SX; Deby, G et al

in Revue du Rhumatisme (English ed.) (1998), 11

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See detailIFN-gamma and TNF-alpha potentiate prostaglandin D2-induced human eosinophil chemotaxis through up-regulation of CRTH2 surface receptor.
EL SHAZLY, Amr ULg; MOONEN, Vincent ULg; MAWET, Marie et al

in International immunopharmacology (2011), 11(11), 1864-70

Prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) receptor CRTH2, is a pro-inflammatory molecule involved in eosinophil recruitment to the allergic airway. We investigated the expression of CRTH2 in eosinophil from allergic ... [more ▼]

Prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) receptor CRTH2, is a pro-inflammatory molecule involved in eosinophil recruitment to the allergic airway. We investigated the expression of CRTH2 in eosinophil from allergic rhinitis patients (AR) and tested the modulatory role of several TH1 and TH2 cytokines closely related to the allergic immunological response, on the expression of CRTH2 receptor, utilizing human eosinophil cell line (Eol-1).The expression of CRTH2 was tested by immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry (FACS). Chemotaxis was performed in micro-chemotaxis chambers. It is shown that the expression of CRTH2 by eosinophils was significantly higher in the nasal tissue and peripheral blood of AR patients, when compared to control subjects. PGD2 exhibited a typical bell shape dose response in attracting eosinophil from AR patients with optimal activity at 10(-7)M. Eol-1 cell surface expression of CRTH2 was significantly up-regulated by 10ng/ml IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha. The percentage of Eol-1 cells expressing the receptor increased by IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha from 12.74%+/-2.66 to 55%+/-8 and 33.8%+/-9.4, respectively. PGD2-induced Eol-1 chemotaxis was not blocked by SB203580, H-89 Dihydrochloride, Bisindo-lylmaleimide, or Genistein. PGD2-induced Eol-1 chemotaxis was potentiated by IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha without changing the signal transduction pathway. Correlation of our results to peripheral blood eosinophils from allergic rhinitis patients confirmed that 3hour pretreatment of eosinophils by 10ng/ml IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha, increased the mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) of CRTH2 from 8.23 to 9.68 and 9.38, respectively, and potentiated PGD2-induced eosinophil chemotaxis. Our results demonstrate a novel synergism between PGD2, IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha, in eosinophil chemotaxis. [less ▲]

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See detailIFPA Meeting 2012 Workshop Report III: trophoblast deportation, gestational trophoblastic disease, placental insufficiency and fetal growth restriction, trophoblast over-invasion and accreta-related pathologies, placental thrombosis and fibrinolysis.
Al-Khan, A.; Bulmer, J. N.; CHANTRAINE, Frédéric ULg et al

in Placenta (2013), 34 Suppl

Workshops are an important part of the IFPA annual meeting as they allow for discussion of specialized topics. At IFPA meeting 2012 there were twelve themed workshops, five of which are summarized in this ... [more ▼]

Workshops are an important part of the IFPA annual meeting as they allow for discussion of specialized topics. At IFPA meeting 2012 there were twelve themed workshops, five of which are summarized in this report. These workshops related to various aspects of placental biology but collectively covered areas of clinical research and pregnancy disorders: 1) trophoblast deportation; 2) gestational trophoblastic disease; 3) placental insufficiency and fetal growth restriction; 4) trophoblast overinvasion and accreta-related pathologies; 5) placental thrombosis and fibrinolysis. [less ▲]

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See detailIGCP 580 - Magnetic susceptibility, correlations and palaeoenvironment.
Da Silva, Anne-Christine ULg; Whalen, Michael; Hladil, Jindrich et al

Conference (2009, September)

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See detailIGCP 580, Magnetic Susceptibility and Gamma-Ray Spectrometry through time. Abstracts book IGCP-580, 4th annual meeting, 24-30th June 2012, Graz, Austria
Kido; Suttner; Piller et al

Book published by Berichte des Institutes für Erdwissenschaften, Karl-Franzens-Universität Graz (2012)

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See detailIGCP-580/596, Geophysical and Geochemical techniques: a window on the Paleozoic world. Abstract book
Whalen; Osadetz; Richards et al

Book published by IGCP-580 (2013)

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See detailIGCP-596 & IGCP 580 Join meeting and field-workshop. International Symposium in Mongolia, Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia, 5-18th August 2014, Abstract Volume
Kido, E.; Waters, J.; Ariunchimeg, Y. et al

Book published by Berichte des Institutes für Erdwissenschaften, , Karl-Franzens-Universität Graz (2014)

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See detailIGCP-SDS Symposium, Climate Change and Biodiversity patterns in the Mid-Palaeozoic, Brussels, 20-22, September 2015, Abstract
Mottequin, Bernard; Denayer, Julien ULg; Konigshof, Peter et al

Book published by STRATA (2015)

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See detailIGCP-SDS Symposium, Climate Change and Biodiversity patterns in the Mid-Palaeozoic, Brussels, September 2015, Field guidebooks
Denayer, Julien ULg; Mottequin, Bernard; Prestianni, Cyrille

Book published by STRATA (2015)

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See detailIgE and mast cells in host defense against parasites and venoms.
Mukai, Kaori; Tsai, Mindy; Starkl, Philipp et al

in Seminars in Immunopathology (2016)

IgE-dependent mast cell activation is a major effector mechanism underlying the pathology associated with allergic disorders. The most dramatic of these IgE-associated disorders is the fatal anaphylaxis ... [more ▼]

IgE-dependent mast cell activation is a major effector mechanism underlying the pathology associated with allergic disorders. The most dramatic of these IgE-associated disorders is the fatal anaphylaxis which can occur in some people who have developed IgE antibodies to otherwise innocuous antigens, such as those contained in certain foods and medicines. Why would such a highly "maladaptive" immune response develop in evolution and be retained to the present day? Host defense against parasites has long been considered the only beneficial function that might be conferred by IgE and mast cells. However, recent studies have provided evidence that, in addition to participating in host resistance to certain parasites, mast cells and IgE are critical components of innate (mast cells) and adaptive (mast cells and IgE) immune responses that can enhance host defense against the toxicity of certain arthropod and animal venoms, including enhancing the survival of mice injected with such venoms. Yet, in some people, developing IgE antibodies to insect or snake venoms puts them at risk for having a potentially fatal anaphylactic reaction upon subsequent exposure to such venoms. Delineating the mechanisms underlying beneficial versus detrimental innate and adaptive immune responses associated with mast cell activation and IgE is likely to enhance our ability to identify potential therapeutic targets in such settings, not only for reducing the pathology associated with allergic disorders but perhaps also for enhancing immune protection against pathogens and animal venoms. [less ▲]

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See detailIgE antibodies and FceRI are critical components of protective type 2 immunity against honeybee and russell's viper venom in mice
Starkl, Philipp; Marichal, Thomas ULg; Reber, Laurent L. et al

in Proceedings of the Type 2 Cell Symposium - Brugge (2014, December)

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See detailIgE antibodies and FceRI are critical mediators of acquired resistance against honeybee and russell's viper venom in mice
Starkl, Philipp; Marichal, Thomas ULg; Reber, Laurent L. et al

in Proceedings of the EAACI Congress 2014 (2014)

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See detailIgE antibodies critically contribute to acquired enhanced resistance to honeybee venom in mice
Marichal, Thomas ULg; Starkl, Philipp; Reber, Laurent L. et al

Conference (2012, September)

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See detailIgE antibodies, FcepsilonRIalpha, and IgE-mediated local anaphylaxis can limit snake venom toxicity.
Starkl, Philipp; Marichal, Thomas ULg; Gaudenzio, Nicolas et al

in The Journal of allergy and clinical immunology (2015)

BACKGROUND: Type 2 cytokine-related immune responses associated with development of antigen-specific IgE antibodies can contribute to pathology in patients with allergic diseases and to fatal anaphylaxis ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Type 2 cytokine-related immune responses associated with development of antigen-specific IgE antibodies can contribute to pathology in patients with allergic diseases and to fatal anaphylaxis. However, recent findings in mice indicate that IgE also can enhance defense against honeybee venom. OBJECTIVE: We tested whether IgE antibodies, IgE-dependent effector mechanisms, and a local anaphylactic reaction to an unrelated antigen can enhance defense against Russell viper venom (RVV) and determined whether such responses can be influenced by immunization protocol or mouse strain. METHODS: We compared the resistance of RVV-immunized wild-type, IgE-deficient, and Fcer1a-deficient mice after injection of a potentially lethal dose of RVV. RESULTS: A single prior exposure to RVV enhanced the ability of wild-type mice, but not mice lacking IgE or functional FcepsilonRI, to survive challenge with a potentially lethal amount of RVV. Moreover, IgE-dependent local passive cutaneous anaphylaxis in response to challenge with an antigen not naturally present in RVV significantly enhanced resistance to the venom. Finally, we observed different effects on resistance to RVV or honeybee venom in BALB/c versus C57BL/6 mice that had received a second exposure to that venom before challenge with a high dose of that venom. CONCLUSION: These observations illustrate the potential benefit of IgE-dependent effector mechanisms in acquired host defense against venoms. The extent to which type 2 immune responses against venoms can decrease pathology associated with envenomation seems to be influenced by the type of venom, the frequency of venom exposure, and the genetic background of the host. [less ▲]

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See detailIgE controlling loci in Czech atopic patients.
Gusareva, Elena ULg; Havelková, Helena; Blažková, Hanna et al

Poster (2006, September 07)

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See detailIgE mediated sensitisation to aeroallergens in an asthmatic cohort: relationship with inflammatory phenotypes and disease severity.
Manise, Maïté ULg; Bakayoko, B.; SCHLEICH, FLorence ULg et al

in International Journal of Clinical Practice (2016), 70(7), 596-605

BACKGROUND: Atopy is known to play an important role in the asthmatic disease. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the frequency of sensitisation to common aeroallergens in a cohort of ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Atopy is known to play an important role in the asthmatic disease. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the frequency of sensitisation to common aeroallergens in a cohort of asthmatics with different inflammatory phenotypes and disease severity. METHODS: We have conducted a retrospective cross-sectional study including 772 asthmatics recruited between 2003 and 2014 in our Asthma Clinic. The patients were defined as asthmatics on the basis of respiratory symptoms together with a positive methacholine test (PC20M) < 16 mg/ml and/or a reversibility to short-acting beta2-agonists (salbutamol) >/= 12% and 200 ml. Sensitisation to house dust mites, grass and birch pollens, cats, dogs and moulds was assessed by RAST and a specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) > 0.35 kU/l was considered as significant. Inflammatory phenotypes were subdivided between pauci-granulocytic (n = 309) (40%), eosinophilic (n = 311) (40%), neutrophilic (N = 134) (17%) and mixed-granulocytic (N = 18) (3%) asthmatics. Severe asthmatics (n = 118) were defined according to the American Thoracic Society (ATS 2000) criteria and compared with mild-to-moderate asthmatics (N = 654). RESULTS: The eosinophilic phenotype was associated with higher levels of total serum IgE compared with neutrophilic and pauci-granulocytic asthma (p < 0.001 for both). Sensitisation rate to dogs and cats was higher in eosinophilic asthmatics (31% and 37%, respectively, p < 0.01 both) compared with neutrophilic (18% and 23% respectively) and pauci-granulocytic asthmatics (20% and 24%, respectively), while sensitisation rate to house dust mites and moulds were rather similar between the groups (ranging from 33% to 40% and from 10% to 16%, respectively). Severe asthmatics had slightly increased total serum IgE compared with mild-to-moderate asthmatics (p < 0.05) without any difference in the sensitisation rate to common aeroallergens. CONCLUSION: Eosinophilic asthma exhibits higher total serum IgE and sensitisation rate towards animal dander while clinical severity, though also associated with higher total IgE, did not preferentially relate to any type of common aeroallergens. [less ▲]

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See detailIgE-mediated anaphylaxis after first intravenous infusion of cyclosporine.
Ebo, D. G.; Piel, Géraldine ULg; Conraads, V. et al

in Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (2001), 87(3), 243-5

BACKGROUND: Intravenous administration of cyclosporine, which contains Cremophor EL (a polyethoxylated castor oil; BASF, Berlin, Germany), has occasionally resulted in an anaphylactic reaction. An ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Intravenous administration of cyclosporine, which contains Cremophor EL (a polyethoxylated castor oil; BASF, Berlin, Germany), has occasionally resulted in an anaphylactic reaction. An apparent hypersensitivity reaction (bronchospasm and decrease in blood pressure) had occurred during heart transplantation in a 59-year-old woman after intravenous infusion of cyclosporine. Subsequent oral administration of cyclosporine precipitated no reaction. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to attempt to ascertain the mechanism responsible for the anaphylactic reaction. METHODS: Hypersensitivity investigations, including total serum IgE and allergen-specific IgE quantifications, skin testing, and basophil activation tests by flow cytometric determination of CD63 upregulation were undertaken in the study patient and in two healthy control subjects who were free of medication. RESULTS: The results of intradermal testing with Cremophor EL were positive after 15 minutes in the study patient only. Both cyclosporine and Cremophor EL induced considerable activation of the basophils from our study patient, with an upregulation of CD63 expression from 1% to 39% and 55%, respectively. In contrast, the expression of CD63 on basophils from the two control subjects remained essentially unchanged. CONCLUSIONS: The negative investigative findings in the control subjects, the patient's clinical manifestations in temporal relationship to the infusion, her positive results on intradermal testing with Cremophor, the basophil activation test results, and her uneventful course after oral administration of cyclosporine strongly support the presence of IgE antibodies to Cremophor EL in our patient. [less ▲]

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