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See detailIgE and mast cells in host defense against parasites and venoms.
Mukai, Kaori; Tsai, Mindy; Starkl, Philipp et al

in Seminars in Immunopathology (2016)

IgE-dependent mast cell activation is a major effector mechanism underlying the pathology associated with allergic disorders. The most dramatic of these IgE-associated disorders is the fatal anaphylaxis ... [more ▼]

IgE-dependent mast cell activation is a major effector mechanism underlying the pathology associated with allergic disorders. The most dramatic of these IgE-associated disorders is the fatal anaphylaxis which can occur in some people who have developed IgE antibodies to otherwise innocuous antigens, such as those contained in certain foods and medicines. Why would such a highly "maladaptive" immune response develop in evolution and be retained to the present day? Host defense against parasites has long been considered the only beneficial function that might be conferred by IgE and mast cells. However, recent studies have provided evidence that, in addition to participating in host resistance to certain parasites, mast cells and IgE are critical components of innate (mast cells) and adaptive (mast cells and IgE) immune responses that can enhance host defense against the toxicity of certain arthropod and animal venoms, including enhancing the survival of mice injected with such venoms. Yet, in some people, developing IgE antibodies to insect or snake venoms puts them at risk for having a potentially fatal anaphylactic reaction upon subsequent exposure to such venoms. Delineating the mechanisms underlying beneficial versus detrimental innate and adaptive immune responses associated with mast cell activation and IgE is likely to enhance our ability to identify potential therapeutic targets in such settings, not only for reducing the pathology associated with allergic disorders but perhaps also for enhancing immune protection against pathogens and animal venoms. [less ▲]

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See detailIgE antibodies and FceRI are critical components of protective type 2 immunity against honeybee and russell's viper venom in mice
Starkl, Philipp; Marichal, Thomas ULg; Reber, Laurent L. et al

in Proceedings of the Type 2 Cell Symposium - Brugge (2014, December)

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See detailIgE antibodies and FceRI are critical mediators of acquired resistance against honeybee and russell's viper venom in mice
Starkl, Philipp; Marichal, Thomas ULg; Reber, Laurent L. et al

in Proceedings of the EAACI Congress 2014 (2014)

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See detailIgE antibodies critically contribute to acquired enhanced resistance to honeybee venom in mice
Marichal, Thomas ULg; Starkl, Philipp; Reber, Laurent L. et al

Conference (2012, September)

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See detailIgE antibodies, FcepsilonRIalpha, and IgE-mediated local anaphylaxis can limit snake venom toxicity.
Starkl, Philipp; Marichal, Thomas ULg; Gaudenzio, Nicolas et al

in The Journal of allergy and clinical immunology (2015)

BACKGROUND: Type 2 cytokine-related immune responses associated with development of antigen-specific IgE antibodies can contribute to pathology in patients with allergic diseases and to fatal anaphylaxis ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Type 2 cytokine-related immune responses associated with development of antigen-specific IgE antibodies can contribute to pathology in patients with allergic diseases and to fatal anaphylaxis. However, recent findings in mice indicate that IgE also can enhance defense against honeybee venom. OBJECTIVE: We tested whether IgE antibodies, IgE-dependent effector mechanisms, and a local anaphylactic reaction to an unrelated antigen can enhance defense against Russell viper venom (RVV) and determined whether such responses can be influenced by immunization protocol or mouse strain. METHODS: We compared the resistance of RVV-immunized wild-type, IgE-deficient, and Fcer1a-deficient mice after injection of a potentially lethal dose of RVV. RESULTS: A single prior exposure to RVV enhanced the ability of wild-type mice, but not mice lacking IgE or functional FcepsilonRI, to survive challenge with a potentially lethal amount of RVV. Moreover, IgE-dependent local passive cutaneous anaphylaxis in response to challenge with an antigen not naturally present in RVV significantly enhanced resistance to the venom. Finally, we observed different effects on resistance to RVV or honeybee venom in BALB/c versus C57BL/6 mice that had received a second exposure to that venom before challenge with a high dose of that venom. CONCLUSION: These observations illustrate the potential benefit of IgE-dependent effector mechanisms in acquired host defense against venoms. The extent to which type 2 immune responses against venoms can decrease pathology associated with envenomation seems to be influenced by the type of venom, the frequency of venom exposure, and the genetic background of the host. [less ▲]

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See detailIgE controlling loci in Czech atopic patients.
Gusareva, Elena ULg; Havelková, Helena; Blažková, Hanna et al

Poster (2006, September 07)

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See detailIgE mediated sensitisation to aeroallergens in an asthmatic cohort: relationship with inflammatory phenotypes and disease severity.
Manise, Maïté ULg; Bakayoko, B.; SCHLEICH, FLorence ULg et al

in International Journal of Clinical Practice (2016), 70(7), 596-605

BACKGROUND: Atopy is known to play an important role in the asthmatic disease. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the frequency of sensitisation to common aeroallergens in a cohort of ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Atopy is known to play an important role in the asthmatic disease. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the frequency of sensitisation to common aeroallergens in a cohort of asthmatics with different inflammatory phenotypes and disease severity. METHODS: We have conducted a retrospective cross-sectional study including 772 asthmatics recruited between 2003 and 2014 in our Asthma Clinic. The patients were defined as asthmatics on the basis of respiratory symptoms together with a positive methacholine test (PC20M) < 16 mg/ml and/or a reversibility to short-acting beta2-agonists (salbutamol) >/= 12% and 200 ml. Sensitisation to house dust mites, grass and birch pollens, cats, dogs and moulds was assessed by RAST and a specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) > 0.35 kU/l was considered as significant. Inflammatory phenotypes were subdivided between pauci-granulocytic (n = 309) (40%), eosinophilic (n = 311) (40%), neutrophilic (N = 134) (17%) and mixed-granulocytic (N = 18) (3%) asthmatics. Severe asthmatics (n = 118) were defined according to the American Thoracic Society (ATS 2000) criteria and compared with mild-to-moderate asthmatics (N = 654). RESULTS: The eosinophilic phenotype was associated with higher levels of total serum IgE compared with neutrophilic and pauci-granulocytic asthma (p < 0.001 for both). Sensitisation rate to dogs and cats was higher in eosinophilic asthmatics (31% and 37%, respectively, p < 0.01 both) compared with neutrophilic (18% and 23% respectively) and pauci-granulocytic asthmatics (20% and 24%, respectively), while sensitisation rate to house dust mites and moulds were rather similar between the groups (ranging from 33% to 40% and from 10% to 16%, respectively). Severe asthmatics had slightly increased total serum IgE compared with mild-to-moderate asthmatics (p < 0.05) without any difference in the sensitisation rate to common aeroallergens. CONCLUSION: Eosinophilic asthma exhibits higher total serum IgE and sensitisation rate towards animal dander while clinical severity, though also associated with higher total IgE, did not preferentially relate to any type of common aeroallergens. [less ▲]

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See detailIgE-mediated anaphylaxis after first intravenous infusion of cyclosporine.
Ebo, D. G.; Piel, Géraldine ULg; Conraads, V. et al

in Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (2001), 87(3), 243-5

BACKGROUND: Intravenous administration of cyclosporine, which contains Cremophor EL (a polyethoxylated castor oil; BASF, Berlin, Germany), has occasionally resulted in an anaphylactic reaction. An ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Intravenous administration of cyclosporine, which contains Cremophor EL (a polyethoxylated castor oil; BASF, Berlin, Germany), has occasionally resulted in an anaphylactic reaction. An apparent hypersensitivity reaction (bronchospasm and decrease in blood pressure) had occurred during heart transplantation in a 59-year-old woman after intravenous infusion of cyclosporine. Subsequent oral administration of cyclosporine precipitated no reaction. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to attempt to ascertain the mechanism responsible for the anaphylactic reaction. METHODS: Hypersensitivity investigations, including total serum IgE and allergen-specific IgE quantifications, skin testing, and basophil activation tests by flow cytometric determination of CD63 upregulation were undertaken in the study patient and in two healthy control subjects who were free of medication. RESULTS: The results of intradermal testing with Cremophor EL were positive after 15 minutes in the study patient only. Both cyclosporine and Cremophor EL induced considerable activation of the basophils from our study patient, with an upregulation of CD63 expression from 1% to 39% and 55%, respectively. In contrast, the expression of CD63 on basophils from the two control subjects remained essentially unchanged. CONCLUSIONS: The negative investigative findings in the control subjects, the patient's clinical manifestations in temporal relationship to the infusion, her positive results on intradermal testing with Cremophor, the basophil activation test results, and her uneventful course after oral administration of cyclosporine strongly support the presence of IgE antibodies to Cremophor EL in our patient. [less ▲]

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See detailThe IGF system in in-vitro human decidualization
Ganeff, Corinne ULg; Chatel, G.; Munaut, Carine ULg et al

in Molecular Human Reproduction (2009), 15(1), 27-38

Decidualization of endometrial stromal cells (ESCs) is critical for a successful pregnancy but the molecular mechanisms of the process are poorly understood. In this study, we investigated whether the ... [more ▼]

Decidualization of endometrial stromal cells (ESCs) is critical for a successful pregnancy but the molecular mechanisms of the process are poorly understood. In this study, we investigated whether the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) network is involved in this cellular process. Expression kinetics of members of the IGF system was examined at both mRNA and protein levels during in-vitro decidualization of cultured human ESCs. We found a significant up-regulation of IGF-II as well as of IGF-I receptor and the A and B insulin receptor (InsR) isoforms. In addition, levels of the key adaptor proteins insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1) and IRS-2 increased, suggesting a potential involvement of the IGF signalling pathway in the decidualization process. Expression of two IGF binding proteins, IGFBP-1 and IGFBP-4, which can inhibit IGF action, also increased. In order to determine whether IGF signalling was activated during decidualization, the phosphorylation status of the receptors and the adaptor proteins was estimated. Only IRS-2 was slightly phosphorylated in decidualized cells and was further activated by the addition of exogenous IGF-II. These results suggest that the IGF signalling pathway could play a crucial role in the functions of decidualized endometrial cells [less ▲]

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See detailIGF-1 but not IL-1bêta effects on the proteoglycan production by chondrocytes are regulated by strontium salts
Henrotin, Yves ULg; Labasse, A; Zheng, X et al

in Osteoarthritis and Cartilage (1997), 5

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See detailIGF-I and IGFBP-3 increase independently of testosterone release during the onset of puberty in cattle
Renaville, Robert ULg; Sneyers, Myriam; Massart, Serge et al

in Growth Regulation (1994), 4(suppl 1), 116

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See detailIGF-I and IGFBP-3 increase independently of testosterone release during the onset of puberty in cattle.
Renaville, Robert ULg; Sneyers, Myriam; Massart, Serge et al

Poster (1994)

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See detailIGF-I and IGFBPs in plasma of growing Landrace and large withe pigs.
Messina, M.; Prandi, A.; Nicolas, Nathalie et al

in Proceedings of the 14th IPVS Congress (1996, July)

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See detailIGF-I and IGFBPs in plasma of growing Landrace and Largewhite pigs
Messina, Maria; Prandi, Alberto; Kettmann, Richard ULg et al

in 14th International Pig Veterinary Society Congress (1995)

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See detailIGF-I and their binding proteins in growing horses
Gerin, Daniele; Messina, Maria; Renaville, Robert ULg et al

in 3° Internat. Conf. farm Anim. Endocrinol. (1998)

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See detailIGF-I and their binding proteins in growing horses.
Gerin, Daniele; Messina, Mariella; Renaville, Robert ULg et al

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement = Biotechnology, Agronomy, Society and Environment [=BASE] (1998), 2(special issue), 34

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See detailIGF-I, IGFBP-2 and IGFBP-3 but not GH consentrations are different in normal and poor growing piglets
Saleri, Roberta; Baratta, Mario; Mainardi, G. L. et al

in Reproduction Nutrition Development (2001), 41

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See detailIGF-II in primary human colorectal tumors: peptide level, activated promoters, parental imprinting and gene rearrangement.
Winkler, Rose ULg; Delacroix, Laurence ULg; Bensbaho, K. et al

in Hormone & Metabolic Research (1999), 31(2-3), 148-54

IGF-II is a polypeptide growth factor with growth and differentiation promoting activities, involved in human development. We have reported previously IGF-II mRNA and peptide overexpression in primary ... [more ▼]

IGF-II is a polypeptide growth factor with growth and differentiation promoting activities, involved in human development. We have reported previously IGF-II mRNA and peptide overexpression in primary human colon cancers. Here we show that the IGF-II peptide content is increased in six primary colon cancers compared to the corresponding healthy tissues. The IGF-II transcripts in healthy and cancerous colon tissues were identified by Northern blotting and RT-PCR. Promoters P3 and P4 were active in most tissues. Relaxation of parental imprinting was observed in two tumors and one healthy tissue, without any correlation with the IGF-II transcript levels. Rearrangements of the IGF-II gene in two tumors containing very high amounts of IGF-II mRNA are described. Fragments containing the breakpoints were cloned by the vectorette-PCR strategy. In both tumors, the breakpoints occurred in repetitive sequences. In one tumor (T11), the breakpoint was localized 2 kb downstream the end of exon 9. The second tumor (T18) contains two modified alleles. In one rearranged allele the breakpoint is located in exon 9. The exact position of the breakpoint in the second rearranged allele has not been identified. In future experiments, the correlation between the gene rearrangements and IGF-II mRNA overexpression will be studied. [less ▲]

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See detailIgf2 expression is required for complete immunological tolerance to insulin
Hansenne, Isabelle; Renard, Chantal; Geenen, Vincent ULg

Poster (2007, July)

Detailed reference viewed: 19 (8 ULg)