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See detailLeft atrial function: pathophysiology, echocardiographic assessment, and clinical applications.
Rosca, M.; Lancellotti, Patrizio ULg; Popescu, B. A. et al

in Heart (2011), 97(23), 1982-9

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See detailLeft atrial thrombus in a newborn with dilated cardiomyopathy
Rigo, Vincent ULg; Rondia, Gilles; Rigo, Jacques ULg

in Edition Spéciale SBP, Vol 1 (2008, February 29)

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See detailA left atrial thrombus too big to embolize.
Lancellotti, Patrizio ULg; Radermecker, Marc ULg; Pierard, Luc ULg

in European Heart Journal (2007), 28(13), 1660

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See detailThe left atrium: an old 'barometer' which can reveal great secrets.
Lancellotti, Patrizio ULg; Henri, Christine

in European journal of heart failure (2014)

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See detail« Left Behind »? Le rôle des non-migrants dans les dynamiques de soins transnationales
Zickgraf, Caroline ULg

in Bousetta, Hassan; Jacquemain, Marc; Martiniello, Marco (Eds.) et al Transnationalisme, dynamique des identités et diversification culturelle dans les villes post-migratoires (in press)

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See detailLeft Behind? A Case Study of Immobile Populations in the Senegalese River Basin
Zickgraf, Caroline ULg

Conference (2014, August)

The Senegalese River Basin has undergone environmental transformations in recent decades that, in combination with poor infrastructure and inadequate resources, has affected the livelihood strategies and ... [more ▼]

The Senegalese River Basin has undergone environmental transformations in recent decades that, in combination with poor infrastructure and inadequate resources, has affected the livelihood strategies and mobility patterns of its residents. As a low-lying city near the mouth of the Senegal River, Saint-Louis is highly vulnerable to flooding. Furthermore, the vulnerability of the city can be attributed to coastal land degradation, high and increasing population density and inadequate infrastructure to manage wastewater, household waste, rain and river water (Dia 2007). In a complex web of migration drivers that include, but are not exclusively linked to, environmental drivers (Black et al. 2011), the region has seen migration out of rural and coastal areas for urban centers and other regions in Senegal. Yet, even if migration is understood as one potential adaptation strategy, not everyone leaves his or her community of origin. In keeping with the themes of this panel, this qualitative case study, conducted in the summer of 2014, explores who stays and why. Furthermore, it asks how the migration of some affects the vulnerability of those who stay. This paper explores alternative hypotheses regarding the impact of migration on communities of origin. Echoing the migration and development debates (de Haas 2009), but expanding them to include the specificities of climate change and, more broadly, environmental transformations, I present data from in-depth interviews with the immobile – shifting the public and academic focus from migrants to those ‘left behind’. This paper explores the relationship between the movers and the stayers within family and household configurations, in which the migration of some may allow others to stay (e.g. through remittances or through the alleviation of pressure on local resources), or may deplete the capital necessary to adapt effectively to environmental changes (e.g. the ‘brain drain’). [less ▲]

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See detailLeft inferior frontal cortex is involved in probabilistic serial reaction time learning
Peigneux, Philippe ULg; Maquet, Pierre ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg et al

in Brain and Cognition (1999), 40(1), 215-219

Cerebral blood flow was estimated using positron emission tomography and H2O15 infusions in 12 volunteers while they were trained on the probabilistic serial reaction time task developed by Jimenez ... [more ▼]

Cerebral blood flow was estimated using positron emission tomography and H2O15 infusions in 12 volunteers while they were trained on the probabilistic serial reaction time task developed by Jimenez, Mender, and Cleeremans (1996). Participants' reaction rimes to predictable and nonpredictable stimuli showed increasing sensitivity to the: probabilistic constraints set by previous elements of the sequence. Analysis by statistical parametric mapping showed a significant interaction between participants' performance and time effect in the left inferior frontal cortex. Our results provide the first evidence of this cerebral area being involved in the processing of contextual information in a probabilistic sequence learning task. [less ▲]

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See detailThe left intraparietal sulcus and verbal short-term memory: Focus of attention or serial order ?
Majerus, Steve ULg; Poncelet, Martine ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg et al

in Neuroimage (2006), 32(2), 880-891

One of the most consistently activated regions during verbal short-term memory (STM) tasks is the left intraparietal sulcus (IPS). However, its precise role remains a matter of debate. While some authors ... [more ▼]

One of the most consistently activated regions during verbal short-term memory (STM) tasks is the left intraparietal sulcus (IPS). However, its precise role remains a matter of debate. While some authors consider the IPS to be a specific store for serial order information, other data suggest that it serves a more general function of attentional focalization. In the current fMRI experiment, we investigated these two hypotheses by presenting different verbal STM conditions that probed recognition for word identity or word order and by assessing functional connectivity of the left IPS with distant brain areas. If the IPS has a role of attentional focalization, then it should be involved in both order and item conditions, but it should be connected to different brain regions, depending on the neural substrates involved in processing the different types of information (order versus phonological/orthographic) to be remembered in the item and order STM conditions. We observed that the left IPS was activated in both order and item STM conditions but for different reasons: during order STM, the left IPS was functionally connected to serial/temporal order processing areas in the right IPS, premotor and cerebellar cortices, while during item STM, the left IPS was connected to phonological and orthographic processing areas in the superior temporal and fusiform gyri. Our data support a position considering that the left IPS acts as an attentional modulator of distant neural networks which themselves are specialized in processing order or language representations. More generally, they strengthen attention-based accounts of verbal STM. [less ▲]

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See detailLeft Main Coronary Dissection after Mild Chest Trauma. Favorable Evolution with Fibrinolytic and Surgical Therapies
Boland, Jean; Limet, Raymond ULg; Trotteur, Geneviève ULg et al

in CHEST (1988), 93(1), 213-4

A 32-year-old woman had acute anterior myocardial infarction after a mild chest trauma (automobile accident). Unstable angina recurred shortly after admission, and extensive dissection of the left ... [more ▼]

A 32-year-old woman had acute anterior myocardial infarction after a mild chest trauma (automobile accident). Unstable angina recurred shortly after admission, and extensive dissection of the left coronary artery was demonstrated. Medical therapy including systemic fibrinolysis was started but clinical stabilization and good long-term result was achieved only by aortocoronary bypass grafting. [less ▲]

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See detailLeft Shoe
Steyaert, Kris ULg; Vincent, Paul

in Dutch Crossing : a Journal of Low Countries studies (1998), 22(2 (Winter)), 142-149

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See detailLeft ventricular apex-dimension loops in acute myocardial infarction.
Pierard, Luc ULg; van Meurs-van Woezik, H.; Roelandt, J.

in The American journal of cardiology (1984), 54(6), 526-9

Apex-dimension loops may provide useful information in patients with acute myocardial infarction because incoordinate contraction and relaxation can be demonstrated. The method could allow assessment of ... [more ▼]

Apex-dimension loops may provide useful information in patients with acute myocardial infarction because incoordinate contraction and relaxation can be demonstrated. The method could allow assessment of the effects of therapeutic interventions. Fifty consecutive patients with AMI in the coronary care unit within 48 hours after the onset of their symptoms were studied. Simultaneous recordings of the echocardiogram and apexcardiogram, which were of an adequate quality for analysis, were obtained in only 7 patients (success rate 14%). In all these patients, incoordinate relaxation was demonstrated. A major practical drawback of the method is the time needed for recording the basic data requiring 2 investigators. Therefore, because of the low success rate and difficulties in obtaining simultaneous recordings, apex-dimension loops are not practical in most patients with acute myocardial infarction. [less ▲]

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See detailLeft ventricular assist device as bridge to liver transplantation in a patient with propionic acidemia and cardiogenic shock.
Ameloot, K.; Vlasselaers, D.; Meersseman, W. et al

in Journal of Pediatrics (2011)

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See detailLeft ventricular contractile reserve in asymptomatic primary mitral regurgitation
Magne, Julien ULg; Mahjoub, H; PIERARD, Luc ULg et al

in European Heart Journal (2013)

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See detailLeft ventricular dyssynchrony: a dynamic condition.
Lancellotti, Patrizio ULg; Moonen, Marie ULg

in Heart Failure Reviews (2011)

Left ventricular dyssynchrony (LVD) is common in heart failure patients with LV systolic dysfunction. Contrary to what it could be expected, LVD is not a stable phenomenon. Various conditions (inducible ... [more ▼]

Left ventricular dyssynchrony (LVD) is common in heart failure patients with LV systolic dysfunction. Contrary to what it could be expected, LVD is not a stable phenomenon. Various conditions (inducible ischemia, exercise, drug administration) may significantly alter the presence and the magnitude of LVD, which could per se modulate response to treatment for heart failure. LVD can be evaluated using validated Doppler-echocardiographic techniques as tissue Doppler imaging. Exercise and dobutamine stress echocardiography can be used tests to unmask LVD. Changes in LV synchronicity during stress test occur independently of inducible ischemia and irrespective of QRS width. The degree of LVD varies substantially from patient to patient. The dynamic increase in LVD represents a strong contributor: (1) to exercise-induced changes in mitral regurgitation, (2) to limitation of stroke volume adaptation during exercise, and (3) to exertional dyspnea. Whether dynamic LVD might independently affect the outcome has not yet been demonstrated. In the setting of CRT, the assessment of dynamic LVD might help patient selection, predict the magnitude of response, and optimize pacing delivery during exercise. Further longitudinal studies are required to confirm the value of assessing dynamic LVD. [less ▲]

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See detailLeft ventricular function at similar heart rates during tachycardia induced by exercise and atrial pacing: an echocardiographic study.
Pierard, Luc ULg; Serruys, P. W.; Roelandt, J. et al

in British heart journal (1987), 57(2), 154-60

M mode echocardiography was used in 10 normal subjects to study left ventricular dimension and function variables at identical heart rates during tachycardia induced by supine bicycle exercise or atrial ... [more ▼]

M mode echocardiography was used in 10 normal subjects to study left ventricular dimension and function variables at identical heart rates during tachycardia induced by supine bicycle exercise or atrial pacing. Echocardiographic data were analysed independently by two observers. The maximum heart rate reached during atrial pacing was lower (mean (1SD) 148 (17) beats/min) than that reached during exercise (mean (1SD) 167 (14) beats/min). The left ventricular end diastolic dimension was greater before supine exercise than before atrial pacing, probably as a result of leg raising. At each graded exercise step the end diastolic dimension remained greater than during atrial pacing and the differences became progressively greater with increasing heart rates. The left ventricular end systolic dimension was not significantly different at each step during the two stresses. During recovery the end systolic dimension was significantly smaller after exercise than at corresponding heart rates induced by atrial pacing. Left ventricular function indices--fractional shortening and peak rates of left ventricular systolic and diastolic dimensional change--were significantly higher during exercise than during atrial pacing and the differences increased with heart rate. It is concluded that the intervention used to change heart rate has an important effect on M mode echocardiographic left ventricular dimensions; indices of left ventricular performance increase progressively during exercise and differ from those measured at the same heart rate during atrial pacing; it is important to consider heart rate, stroke volume, and loading conditions when reference values are used and when the effects of a particular stress are to be interpreted. [less ▲]

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See detailLeft ventricular potentiation at a reduced exercise level: a cause of false-negative radionuclide ventriculograms.
McMeekin, J. D.; Wahl, R. L.; Legrand, Victor ULg et al

in American journal of physiologic imaging (1986), 1(2), 59-66

During exercise radionuclide ventriculography (RVG), many patients cannot maintain peak workload for acquisition of more than a left anterior oblique view. To acquire further views, the workload may have ... [more ▼]

During exercise radionuclide ventriculography (RVG), many patients cannot maintain peak workload for acquisition of more than a left anterior oblique view. To acquire further views, the workload may have to be reduced. In this study of 16 normals and 20 patients with coronary disease, the workload at peak exercise was reduced by approximately 40%. By paired t-test analysis, there was a rise in the left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) in patients with coronary disease from the peak exercise workload to the reduced workload level (postpeak) (52.4 +/- 15.3 to 59.3 +/- 13.7, P = .0001). There was also improvement in LVEF in the normals at the postpeak workload (71.3 +/- 11.7 to 75.1 +/- 13.7, P = .05). Of five coronary disease patients with exercise-induced wall motion abnormalities, four returned to baseline motion at the reduced exercise levels. Partial workload reduction can lead to an increase in LVEF and improvement in wall motion and thus, may result in false-negative studies. [less ▲]

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See detailLeft ventricular preload-adjusted maximal power: Clinically useful marker of LV contractility ?
Segers, P.; Tchana-Sato, Vincent ULg; Leather, H. A. et al

in Circulation (2003, October 28), 108(17, Suppl. S), 396-396

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See detailLeft ventricular regional function and maximal exercise capacity in aortic stenosis.
Dulgheru, Raluca; Magne, Julien; DAVIN, Laurent ULg et al

in European Heart Journal - Cardiovascular Imaging (in press)

AIMS: The objective assessment of maximal exercise capacity (MEC) using peak oxygen consumption (VO2) measurement may be helpful in the management of asymptomatic aortic stenosis (AS) patients. However ... [more ▼]

AIMS: The objective assessment of maximal exercise capacity (MEC) using peak oxygen consumption (VO2) measurement may be helpful in the management of asymptomatic aortic stenosis (AS) patients. However, the relationship between left ventricular (LV) function and MEC has been relatively unexplored. We aimed to identify which echocardiographic parameters of LV systolic function can predict MEC in asymptomatic AS. METHODS AND RESULTS: Asymptomatic patients with moderate to severe AS (n = 44, aortic valve area <1.5 cm2, 66 ± 13 years, 75% of men) and preserved LV ejection fraction (LVEF > 50%) were prospectively referred for resting echocardiography and cardiopulmonary exercise test. LV longitudinal strain (LS) of each myocardial segment was measured by speckle tracking echocardiography (STE) from the apical (aLS) 4-, 2-, and 3-chamber views. An average value of the LS of the analysable segments was provided for each myocardial region: basal (bLS), mid (mLS), and aLS. LV circumferential and radial strains were measured from short-axis views. Peak VO2 was 20.1 ± 5.8 mL/kg/min (median 20.7 mL/kg/min; range 7.2-32.3 mL/kg/min). According to the median of peak VO2, patients with reduced MEC were significantly older (P < 0.001) and more frequently females (P = 0.05). There were significant correlations between peak VO2 and age (r = -0.44), LV end-diastolic volume (r = 0.35), LV stroke volume (r = 0.37), indexed stroke volume (r = 0.32), and E/e' ratio (r = -0.37, all P < 0.04). Parameters of AS severity and LVEF did not correlate with peak VO2 (P = NS for all). Among LV deformation parameters, bLS and mLS were significantly associated with peakVO2 (r = 0.43, P = 0.005, and r = 0.32, P = 0.04, respectively). With multivariable analysis, female gender (β = 4.9; P = 0.008) and bLS (β = 0.50; P = 0.03) were the only independent determinants (r2 = 0.423) of peak VO2. CONCLUSION: In asymptomatic AS, impaired LV myocardial longitudinal function determines reduced MEC. Basal LS was the only parameter of LV regional function independently associated with MEC. [less ▲]

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