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See detailMusiques noires et supports numériques
Sacré, Robert ULg

Article for general public (2005)

"Sacred Steel - The Steel Guitar Tradition of the House of God Churches" ( DVD Arhoolie AFV203) - " Clifton Chenier , the King of Zydeco" ( DVD Arhoolie 401)

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See detailLes musiques populaires en Belgique après 1945
Pirenne, Christophe ULg

Scientific conference (2007, July 25)

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See detailLes musiques populaires en Belgique après 1945
Pirenne, Christophe ULg

Scientific conference (2002, July 22)

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See detailLes musiques populaires extrêmes dans les démocraties libérales
Pirenne, Christophe ULg

Scientific conference (2003, October 21)

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See detailMusiques, musiciens et participation électorale des citoyens issus de l’immigration. Le cas des élections présidentielles américaines de 2008
Martiniello, Marco ULg; Lafleur, Jean-Michel ULg

in Revue Européenne des Migrations Internationales (2009), 25(2), 101-118

This article seeks to examine the relevance of popular culture and music in particular in the context of post-migratory multicultural societies. More precisely, we aim to demonstrate how music and ... [more ▼]

This article seeks to examine the relevance of popular culture and music in particular in the context of post-migratory multicultural societies. More precisely, we aim to demonstrate how music and musicians contribute – in specific spatial and temporal settings – to the mobilization of some migrant origin populations. The article starts with a conceptual discussion on the role of music for ethnic and migrant groups and on the role of music and musicians in electoral campaigns. Subsequently, we review the case of the 2008 US presidential campaign to show the relevance of minority artists’ productions and the political use that can be made out of it in competitive electoral contexts such as that of the United States. [less ▲]

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See detailMust be trained in geriatric medicine
O'Neill, D; Andersen-Ranberg, K; Cherubini, A et al

in British Medical Journal (2012)

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See detailMusulmans en Belgique: un statut juridique spécifique?
Carlier, Jean-Yves ULg

Book published by Academia-Sybidi (1989)

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See detailMutaciones de AIP en adenomas hipofisarios familiares y esporadicos: experiencia local y revision de la literatura.
Fajardo-Montanana, C.; Daly, Adrian ULg; Riesgo-Suarez, P. et al

in Endocrinologia y Nutricion (2009), 56(7), 369-377

Clinically relevant pituitary adenomas occur 3-5 times more frequently than previously thought. The majority are isolated cases, but their presentation can be familial in the setting of known syndromes ... [more ▼]

Clinically relevant pituitary adenomas occur 3-5 times more frequently than previously thought. The majority are isolated cases, but their presentation can be familial in the setting of known syndromes such as multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN)-1 and Carney complex. When 2 or more cases of pituitary adenomas occur in the same family in the absence of the above-mentioned syndromes, a diagnosis of FIPA (familial isolated pituitary adenomas) is made, which accounts for 1-2% of all pituitary adenomas. Mutations of the gene AIP (aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein) may account for 15% of FIPA families (50% of familial acromegaly), and as such the genetic causes continue to be studied. Also mutations in AIP can be detected in sporadic adenomas among young populations (< 30 years of age). We describe the characteristics of FIPA, detailing the study of a spanish family, in this case AIP mutation negative. Also, the reported findings in sporadic adenomas in the young population are detailed, accompanied by the description of a 19- year old patient with an intronic AIP mutation. Multicenter studies have provided understanding of aspects such as mutations in AIP; however, further studies are necessary to identify other genes involved in FIPA and sporadic pituitary adenomas occurring at a young age. [less ▲]

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See detailMutagenesis of plants overexpressing CONSTANS demonstrates novel interactions among Arabidopsis flowering-time genes.
Onouchi, Hitoshi; Igeno, M. Isabel; Périlleux, Claire ULg et al

in Plant Cell (2000), 12(6), 885-900

CONSTANS (CO) promotes flowering of Arabidopsis in response to long photoperiods. Transgenic plants carrying CO fused with the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter (35S::CO) flowered earlier than did the ... [more ▼]

CONSTANS (CO) promotes flowering of Arabidopsis in response to long photoperiods. Transgenic plants carrying CO fused with the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter (35S::CO) flowered earlier than did the wild type and were almost completely insensitive to length of day. Genes required for CO to promote flowering were identified by screening for mutations that suppress the effect of 35S::CO. Four mutations were identified that partially suppressed the early-flowering phenotype caused by 35S::CO. One of these mutations, suppressor of overexpression of CO 1 (soc1), defines a new locus, demonstrating that the mutagenesis approach is effective in identifying novel flowering-time mutations. The other three suppressor mutations are allelic with previously described mutations that cause late flowering. Two of them are alleles of ft, indicating that FT is required for CO to promote early flowering and most likely acts after CO in the hierarchy of flowering-time genes. The fourth suppressor mutation is an allele of fwa, and fwa soc1 35S::CO plants flowered at approximately the same time as co mutants, suggesting that a combination of fwa and soc1 abolishes the promotion of flowering by CO. Besides delaying flowering, fwa acted synergistically with 35S::CO to repress floral development after bolting. The latter phenotype was not shown by any of the progenitors and was most probably caused by a reduction in the function of LEAFY. These genetic interactions suggest models for how CO, FWA, FT, and SOC1 interact during the transition to flowering. [less ▲]

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See detailMutan produced in potato amyloplasts adheres to starch granules
Jacon, Géraldine ULg

in Plant Biotechnology Journal (2005), 3

Production of water-insoluble mutan polymers in Kardal potato tubers was investigated after expression of a full-length (Gtf I) and a truncated mutansucrase gene referred to as GtfICAT (Gtf I without ... [more ▼]

Production of water-insoluble mutan polymers in Kardal potato tubers was investigated after expression of a full-length (Gtf I) and a truncated mutansucrase gene referred to as GtfICAT (Gtf I without glucan-binding domain) from Streptococcus downei. Subsequent effects on starch biosynthesis at the molecular and biochemical levels were studied. Expression of the GtfICAT gene resulted in the adhesion of mutan material on starch granules, which stained red with erythrosine, and which was hydrolysed by exo-mutanase. In addition, GtfICAT-expressing plants exhibited a severely altered tuber phenotype and starch granule morphology in comparison to those expressing the full-length Gtf I gene. In spite of that, no structural changes at the starch level were observed. Expression levels of the sucrose- regulated, AGPase and GBSSI genes were down-regulated in only the GTFICAT transformants, showing that GtfICAT expression interfered with the starch biosynthetic pathway. In accordance with the down-regulated AGPase gene, a lower starch content was observed in the GTFICAT transformants. Finally, the rheological properties of the GTFICAT starches were modified; they showed a higher retrogradation during cooling of the starch paste. [less ▲]

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See detailMutant huntingtin-impaired degradation of beta-catenin causes neurotoxicity in Huntington's disease.
Godin, Juliette ULg; Poizat, Ghislaine; Hickey, Myriam et al

in EMBO Journal (2010), 29(14)

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See detailMutants of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii deficient in mitochondrial complex I: Characterization of two mutations affecting the nd1 coding sequence
Remacle, Claire ULg; Baurain, Denis ULg; Cardol, Pierre ULg et al

in Genetics (2001), 158(3), 1051-60

The mitochondrial rotenone-sensitive NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) comprises more than 30 subunits, the majority of which are encoded by the nucleus. In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, only five ... [more ▼]

The mitochondrial rotenone-sensitive NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) comprises more than 30 subunits, the majority of which are encoded by the nucleus. In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, only five components of complex I are coded for by mitochondrial genes. Three mutants deprived of complex I activity and displaying slow growth in the dark were isolated after mutagenic treatment with acriflavine. A genetical analysis demonstrated that two mutations (dum20 and dum25) affect the mitochondrial genome whereas the third mutation (dn26) is of nuclear origin. Recombinational analyses showed that dum20 and dum25 are closely linked on the genetic map of the mitochondrial genome and could affect the nd1 gene. A sequencing analysis confirmed this conclusion: dum20 is a deletion of one T at codon 243 of nd1; dum25 corresponds to a 6-bp deletion that eliminates two amino acids located in a very conserved hydrophilic segment of the protein. [less ▲]

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See detailMutation analysis of coding sequences for type I procollagen in individuals with low bone density.
Spotila, L. D.; Colige, Alain ULg; Sereda, L. et al

in Journal of Bone and Mineral Research (1994), 9(6), 923-32

Mutations in one of the two genes encoding type I procollagen (COL1A1 and COL1A2) are frequently the cause of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI), a disorder characterized by brittle bones. Here we tested ... [more ▼]

Mutations in one of the two genes encoding type I procollagen (COL1A1 and COL1A2) are frequently the cause of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI), a disorder characterized by brittle bones. Here we tested whether patients with low bone density also have mutations in these genes. The 26 patients studied had no apparent metabolic bone disease, but most had a positive family history of osteopenia or osteoporosis. Although a diagnosis of OI was considered by the clinician in some cases, the clinical criteria for OI were not satisfied. Our strategy for mutation analysis consisted of PCR amplification of cDNA made to fibroblast mRNA using primers specific for the coding regions of COL1A1 and COL1A2. The PCR products were then sequenced directly with primers located within each PCR product. We found that 3 of 26 patients had mutations that altered the encoded amino acid. One mutation, at position alpha 2(I)-661 has been reported (Spotila et al. 1991 Proc Natl Acad Sci USA PNAS 88:5423). The other 2 patients, who were not related to each other, had a mutation that altered the proline codon at alpha 1(I)-27 to alanine. This mutation was not found in 81 normal individuals or in 37 additional osteopenic individuals. However, its effect on the biologic function of type I collagen, as well as its role in osteopenia, is uncertain. In addition to the two mutations, we found a polymorphism in codon alpha 2(I)-459. Although this polymorphism involved an amino acid substitution, it was present with equal frequency in the patient and the normal population. By analyzing this and previously reported neutral sequence variants in the COL1A2 gene, we determined that all patients expressed both alleles of the COL1A2 gene. The 12 patients who were heterozygous for a COL1A1 neutral sequence variant also expressed both alleles. Here we present all PCR primer and sequencing primer information. The results suggest that surveying a larger group of similarly selected individuals may reveal additional mutations in the COL1A1 or COL1A2 genes. [less ▲]

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See detailMutation analysis of the MEN1 gene in Belgian patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 and related diseases.
Poncin, Jacques ULg; Abs, R.; Velkeniers, B. et al

in Human Mutation (1999), 13(1), 54-60

Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by tumors in parathyroids, enteropancreatic endocrine tissues, anterior pituitary, and other tissues. The gene ... [more ▼]

Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by tumors in parathyroids, enteropancreatic endocrine tissues, anterior pituitary, and other tissues. The gene for MEN1 has recently been cloned and shown to code for a 610-amino acid protein of enigmatic function which probably acts as a tumor suppressor. Several mutations causing the MEN1 phenotype have been recently identified. In order to determine the spectrum of MEN1 gene mutations in a sample of 25 Belgian patients, we have systematically screened the 10 exons and adjacent sequences of the MEN1 gene by means of an automatic sequencing protocol. Twelve different mutations were identified including nonsense, frameshift, splicing, and missense mutations. Two of these mutations (D172Y and 357del4) occurred more than once. A missense mutation was also found in a kindred with familial hyperparathyroidism. We observed no significant correlation between the nature or position of mutation and the clinical status. We have also detected 6 intragenic polymorphisms and DNA sequence variants and have analyzed their frequencies in our population. [less ▲]

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See detailMutation analysis of the MEN1 gene in Belgian patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia type I and related diseases
Poncin, Jacques ULg; Abs, R.; Velkeniers, B. et al

in 5th Euroregional Oncology meeting - abstract book (1998)

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See detailMutation analysis of the MEN1 gene in Belgian patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia type I and related diseases
Poncin, Jacques ULg; Abs, R.; Velkeniers, B. et al

in IV european Congress of Endocrinology - Abstract book (1998)

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See detailMutation analysis of the MEN1 gene in Belgian patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia type I and related diseases
Poncin, Jacques ULg; Abs, R.; Velkeniers, B. et al

in IV european Congress of Endocrinology - Abstract book (1998)

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See detailMutation analysis of the MEN1 gene in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1, familial acromegaly and familial isolated hyperparathyroidism.
Teh, B. T.; Kytola, S.; Farnebo, F. et al

in Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism (1998), 83(8), 2621-2626

Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN 1) is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by neoplasia of the parathyroid glands, the endocrine pancreas, and the anterior pituitary gland. In addition ... [more ▼]

Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN 1) is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by neoplasia of the parathyroid glands, the endocrine pancreas, and the anterior pituitary gland. In addition, families with isolated endocrine neoplasia, notably familial isolated hyperparathyroidism (FIHP) and familial acromegaly, have also been reported. However, whether these families constitute MEN 1 variants or separate entities remains speculative as the genetic bases for these diseases are unclear. The gene for MEN 1 has recently been cloned and characterized. Using single strand conformation analysis (SSCA) and sequencing, we performed mutation analysis in: a) a total of 55 MEN 1 families from 7 countries, b) 13 isolated MEN 1 cases without family history of the disease, c) 8 acromegaly families, and d) 4 FIHP families. Mutations were identified in 27 MEN 1 families and 9 isolated cases. The 22 different mutations spread across most of the 9 translated exons and included frameshift (11), nonsense (6), splice (2), missense mutations (2), and in-frame deletions (1). Among the 19 Finnish MEN 1 probands, a 1466del12 mutation was identified in 6 families with identical 11q13 haplotypes and in 2 isolated cases indicating a common founder. One frameshift mutation caused by 359del4 (GTCT) was found in 1 isolated case and 4 kindreds of different origin and haplotypes; this mutation therefore represents a common "warm" spot in the MEN1 gene. By analyzing the DNA of the parents of an isolated case one mutation was confirmed to be de novo. No mutation was found in any of the acromegaly and small FIHP families, suggesting that genetic defects other than the MEN1 gene might be involved and that additional such families need to be analyzed. [less ▲]

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See detailA mutation creating a potential illegitimate microRNA target site in the myostatin gene affects muscularity in sheep.
Clop, Alex; Marcq, Fabienne ULg; Takeda, Haruko ULg et al

in Nature Genetics (2006), 38(7), 813-8

Texel sheep are renowned for their exceptional meatiness. To identify the genes underlying this economically important feature, we performed a whole-genome scan in a Romanov x Texel F2 population. We ... [more ▼]

Texel sheep are renowned for their exceptional meatiness. To identify the genes underlying this economically important feature, we performed a whole-genome scan in a Romanov x Texel F2 population. We mapped a quantitative trait locus with a major effect on muscle mass to chromosome 2 and subsequently fine-mapped it to a chromosome interval encompassing the myostatin (GDF8) gene. We herein demonstrate that the GDF8 allele of Texel sheep is characterized by a G to A transition in the 3' UTR that creates a target site for mir1 and mir206, microRNAs (miRNAs) that are highly expressed in skeletal muscle. This causes translational inhibition of the myostatin gene and hence contributes to the muscular hypertrophy of Texel sheep. Analysis of SNP databases for humans and mice demonstrates that mutations creating or destroying putative miRNA target sites are abundant and might be important effectors of phenotypic variation. [less ▲]

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