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See detailManaging Hybridity: (Inter-)Organizational Strategies in the Fair Trade Field
Huybrechts, Benjamin ULg

Conference (2011, July 07)

This paper aims to examine the concrete strategies through which organizations may reach compromises between conflicting logics. To reach this goal, this paper tries to capture some of the interactions ... [more ▼]

This paper aims to examine the concrete strategies through which organizations may reach compromises between conflicting logics. To reach this goal, this paper tries to capture some of the interactions between the organizational, inter-organizational and field levels in terms of management and diffusion of plural logics, using the case of social enterprises in the Fair Trade field. [less ▲]

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See detailManaging Migration for the Benefit of Europe
Martiniello, Marco ULg

Scientific conference (2003, May 15)

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See detailManaging Pests : consumers and commitments: The case of apple and pear growers in Belgium's Lower Meuse Region
Collet, Eric; Mormont, Marc ULg

in Environment & Planning A (2003), 35(3), 413-427

The authors analyse the construction of a seed fruit market. The conventional market had led to the 'anonymousness' of the fruit and to disconnected temporalities. The process needs new types of ... [more ▼]

The authors analyse the construction of a seed fruit market. The conventional market had led to the 'anonymousness' of the fruit and to disconnected temporalities. The process needs new types of coordination and components within the common information channels and actors' network. It also needs the construction of a new contract between producers and consumers, that the conventional market is unable to allow. Producers are experimenting with direct contact with the final consumer to find ways of allowing it. The fruit is replaced in the subject's experience of the final consumer and in the grower's story. The grower's story deals with managing pests, consumers, and commitments through a harmless action: eating a pear or an apple. [less ▲]

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See detailMANAGING PUBLIC ORDER DURING
Schoenaers, Frédéric ULg; Vincent, Jeffrey; Easton, Marleen et al

Conference (2012, September)

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See detailManaging Research at the University
Grandjean, Geoffrey ULg

Scientific conference (2011, September 28)

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See detailManaging the carnivore comeback: assessing the adaptive capacity of the Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx) to cohabit with humans in shared landscapes
Bouyer, Yaëlle ULg

Doctoral thesis (2015)

Conflicts between humans and large carnivores are one of the most visible examples of the challenges that arise when seeking to achieve coexistence between humans and wildlife. With their large spatial ... [more ▼]

Conflicts between humans and large carnivores are one of the most visible examples of the challenges that arise when seeking to achieve coexistence between humans and wildlife. With their large spatial requirements and predatory behavior, large carnivores are among the most difficult species to preserve in our modern day landscapes. Although large carnivores are usually considered as the epitomes of wilderness, because of human population growth and habitat fragmentation they are inexorably and increasingly faced with the need to live in human-modified landscapes. As a direct consequence, conflicts over depredation on livestock, competition for game species and sometimes over human injury or death will only increase if clear management measures are not taken. This is particularly true in Europe, where, after many decades of absence, large carnivores are recolonizing areas where millions of people are present and where landscapes have been drastically modified. Two approaches to integrating wildlife into a human-dominated world have been proposed at an international scale. The first solution is called land sparing, in which wildlife lives exclusively in protected or wilderness areas where contact between animals and humans will be reduced to the minimum. The second solution, called land sharing, proposes to integrate human activities and wildlife in the same landscapes in non-protected interface zones in what is often called a coexistence approach. In a context of scarce true wilderness areas and a continuum of human-modified habitats, land sharing (i.e. the coexistence approach) is seen as the only possible approach valid for Europe. While a coexistence approach can be readily implemented with smaller species, it can represent a major challenge for species with large space requirements and with predatory behavior. To help manage these species in a long-term conservation vision and to predict where potential conflicts could arise between humans and carnivores, information on large carnivores and their habitat use in anthropogenic landscapes is a pre-requisite. With the return of Eurasian lynx Lynx lynx in Western Europe, the most densely populated areas of the continent_ information on the species tolerance to human land use will help predict where it is likely to occur in anthropogenic landscapes. Data collected in Scandinavia over 15 years were used to assess the use of landscape by lynx. In this study, we explored the effect of anthropogenic and environmental factors on Eurasian lynx habitat use in Scandinavia. The work was developed along two main axes. The first axis aims to explore large scale potential patterns of lynx distribution through transferability of results obtained from habitat modelling to geographically different areas. Transferability of results was tested in two steps. Firstly, transferability success (i.e. predictive ability of the map) was tested at a regional scale using data on roe-deer, the main prey of lynx, to create a map of relative distribution and abundance of prey in southeastern Norway (Chapter 1). Secondly, transferability success was assessed at a larger extent and using data obtained from different sampling method (Chapter 2). A habitat suitability map for Eurasian lynx was produced to be used in management planning in geographically differentiated lynx management zones in Scandinavia. The results indicated that transferability of results from one region to an ecologically different region must be taken with caution. Nevertheless, the habitat suitability maps we constructed on the basis of extrapolation are a valuable asset to help management of the Scandinavian lynx population. The second axis deals with lynx habitat use in relation to anthropogenic and environmental predictors. Lynx tolerance to human presence was first explored by looking at the orientation of home range in the landscape, taking into account proxies of human presence (Chapter 3). Values of these proxies were compared both inside home ranges and within a buffer surrounding the home ranges for several lynx inhabiting an anthropogenic gradient going from near-wilderness to urban periphery. Results showed a high diversity in the extent to which individual lynx are exposed to human influence, indicating that lynx are highly adaptable in terms of living space. Lynx seemed to be able to orientate their home range in order to avoid highest human impacts and select for areas of medium human impacts. Building on these results, finer scale information on lynx habitat use in an anthropogenic landscape were obtained taking into consideration different types of behavior (day-beds, moving and killing) displayed by adult lynx, as well as the effect of cumulative anthropogenic pressures on habitat selection (Chapter 4). Our results showed that lynx select for areas with medium levels of human modification, avoiding both the areas with highest and least modification. Females in general appear to be less tolerant to human modification than males, especially for day-beds. Our study shows that Eurasian lynx can be considered as a species that is adaptable to human- induced changes in landscape even if its motivation to tolerate human presence is clearly linked to the presence and density level of its main prey, the roe deer. Our work shows that, contrary to much of the public and many conservation professionals’ opinions, land sharing with large carnivores in Europe may be possible – even in the immediate proximity to urban centers. However, it is important to bear in mind that these results were obtained from countries with a relatively low human population density; even though some individuals observed lived in the periphery of large cities, the level of habitat fragmentation is less severe than in most of Western Europe. In order to properly assess the capacity of Eurasian lynx to live in highly populated areas, such as the Benelux, more detailed information on lynx distribution from continental European will be needed. However, our results underline the value of combining both correlational and mechanistic studies, and the need for caution in extrapolating data too far from its original context. As large carnivore recovery continues to progress in Europe we may not yet have seen the limits of these species' abilities to adapt. [less ▲]

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See detailManaging the osteoporotic patient today
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg

in BONE (2007), 40(5, Suppl. 1), 12-18

as reduced pain and disability. The unique mechanism of action of strontium ranelate corrects bone turnover so that it is rebalanced in favor of bone formation. Double-blind, placebo-controlled studies in ... [more ▼]

as reduced pain and disability. The unique mechanism of action of strontium ranelate corrects bone turnover so that it is rebalanced in favor of bone formation. Double-blind, placebo-controlled studies in postmenopausal osteoporosis show it to be effective in reducing vertebral and hip fracture risks. Treatment efficacy has been documented across a wide range of patient profiles and appears to be independent of all the major determinants of fracture risk, including the severity of the disease at baseline, the number of prevalent fractures, and the age of the patient. This antifracture efficacy translates into clinical benefits, including a reduction in the rate of height loss and an increase in the number of patients free of back pain. Strontium ranelate is also one of the few anti osteoporotic drugs with data to demonstrate an improvement in quality of life indices. The rates of compliance with treatment were over 80% in phase 3 studies, reflecting the tolerability and safety profile and the ease of administration of this agent. Strontium ranelate thus offers significant clinical benefits in terms of efficacy, tolerability, and ease of administration in the treatment of postmenopausal women with osteoporosis fractures. (c) 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailManaging understory light to maintain a mixture of species with different shade tolerance
Ligot, Gauthier ULg; Balandier, Philippe; Courbaud, Benoît et al

in Forest Ecology & Management (2014)

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See detailManaging understory light to maintain the coexistence of forest tree species with different shade tolerances
Ligot, Gauthier ULg

Doctoral thesis (2014)

Similar to the management of the other environmental resources, forest management has been questioned and more sustainable practices of forest management are being sought. New close-to-nature practices ... [more ▼]

Similar to the management of the other environmental resources, forest management has been questioned and more sustainable practices of forest management are being sought. New close-to-nature practices aim to favor natural processes over human interventions. Particularly, continuous-cover forestry has the goal of relying on natural regeneration, and maintaining irregular stand structure and tree species mixture. However, maintaining mixture of species with different shade tolerances appears arduous with such a silvicultural system. Successfully managing irregular and mixed forests, relying on natural processes, requires a strong knowledge of the ecology of natural regeneration. In particular, strong knowledge is required to predict the result of the interspecific competition in the understory depending upon light availability. The amount of radiation transmitted to the understory is indeed a critical factor determining regeneration dynamics. It determines, at least in part, regeneration composition because of interspecific differences of growth and survival under shade. Moreover, our quantitative understanding of understory light in uneven-aged and mixed stands remains incomplete. A better quantitative understanding of understory light is needed to provide quantitative guidelines for the management of understory light in uneven-aged and mixed stands and, hence, for the management of natural regeneration. The purpose of this thesis is to determine how close-to-nature forest management can maintain mixtures of species with contrasting shade tolerances. I consider ecological conditions with good water and nutrient supplies. In these conditions, partially closed canopy limits the amount of light that reaches the understory, and light is the major factor driving regeneration composition. Consequently, I study the dynamics of natural regeneration with regards to light availability as well as the interception of light by the canopy of heterogeneous stands. Studying the regeneration ecology of two species with contrasting shade tolerances (Fagus sylvatica L. and Quercus petraea (Matt.) Liebl.), I find that the shade-tolerant species outgrow the less shade-tolerant species in all light conditions. Even though the control of understory light with continuous-cover silviculture is required to sustain the growth of less shade-tolerant regenerations, it might not be sufficient to maintain the coexistence of species with contrasting shade tolerances. In order to examine the effects of canopy structure and composition on understory light availability, I use a model of light interception by heterogeneous canopies after synthesizing and discussing the approaches reported in the literature. The model predicts satisfactorily measures of transmitted light even though it is a relatively simple radiative transfer model. I next explore how various silvicultural treatments can be manipulated to provide favorable understory light conditions for natural regeneration. These silvicultural strategies correspond to selective thinnings of five different types, e.g., harvesting preferentially small trees, large trees, or trees of shade-tolerant species or creating circular gaps. The results underline that creating favorable understory light conditions for natural regeneration can be achieved with various regeneration treatments. However, the adequate reduction of stand density depends upon the chosen silvicultural strategies. In particular, creating gaps of about 500 m2 provides adequate light for small regeneration clumps. Harvesting preferentially small and trees of shade-tolerant species are also appropriate but required higher harvest intensity. Harvesting preferentially large trees slightly increases understory light and promotes more shade-tolerant species than less shade-tolerant species. In order to maintain the coexistence of species with contrasting shade tolerances, forest manager must control understory light and manually suppress the regeneration of the shade-tolerant species. The outcome of this study provides foresters with the necessary tools to evaluate how silvicultural treatments can be manipulated to create or maintain favorable light conditions for the regeneration of species of different shade tolerances. Guidelines are additionally proposed for forest managers wanting to maintain the coexistence of species with contrasting shade tolerances. [less ▲]

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See detailLe mandat apparent des conseils techniques des assureurs, note sous Liège, 29 mars 2010
Kohl, Benoît ULg; Salzburger, Romain ULg

Book published by Confédération Nationale de la Construction (2012)

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See detailLe mandat d'arrêt européen : remise en cause du mécanisme de simple remise.
Monville, Pierre ULg

in Journal des Tribunaux Droit Européen (2003)

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See detailMandat d’arrêt européen et remise des nationaux
Flore, Daniel ULg

in European Arrest Warrant (2005)

Detailed reference viewed: 29 (7 ULg)
See detailLe mandat d'arrêt européen
Thevissen, Patrick ULg

Conference (2011, January 14)

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See detailLe mandat. Pratique judiciaire et notariale
Kohl, Benoît ULg

Book published by Larcier (2014)

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See detailMandements épiscopaux et dispositif cérémoniel liégeois (XVIIe-XVIIIe siècle)
Delfosse, Annick ULg

in Bulletin de la Société d'Art et d'Histoire du Diocèse de Liège (2011), LXIX

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See detailMandible Behavior in Obstructive Sleep Apnea Patients Under CPAP Treatment
Senny, Frédéric ULg; Maury, Gisèle; CAMBRON, Laurent ULg et al

in Open Sleep Journal (2012), 5

Aim: To investigate whether obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients present different behaviors of mandible movements before and under CPAP therapy. Materials and Methodology: In this retrospective study ... [more ▼]

Aim: To investigate whether obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients present different behaviors of mandible movements before and under CPAP therapy. Materials and Methodology: In this retrospective study, patients were selected according to inclusion criteria: both the diagnostic polysomnography recording showing an OSA with an apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) greater than 25 (n/h) and the related CPAP therapy control recordings were available, presence of mandible movement and mask pressure signals in the recordings, and tolerance to the applied positive pressure. Statistical analysis on four parameters, namely the apneahypopnea index (AHI), the arousal index (ArI), the average of the mandible lowering during sleep (aLOW), and the average amplitude of the oscillations of the mandible movement signal (aAMPL), was performed on two sets of recordings: OSA and CPAP therapy. Results: Thirty-four patients satisfied the inclusion criteria, thus both OSA and CPAP groups included thirty-four recordings each. Significant difference (p < 0.001) was found in the OSA group compared with the CPAP group when considering either the four parameters or only the two ones related to mandible movements. Conclusions: When an efficient CPAP pressure is applied, the mouth is less open and presents fewer broad sharp closure movements, and oscillating mandible movements are absent or very small. [less ▲]

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See detailMandibles and molars of the wood mouse, Apodemus sylvaticus (L.): integrated latitudinal pattern and mosaic insular evolution
Renaud, Sabrina; Michaux, Johan ULg

in Journal of Biogeography (2007), 34(2), 339-355

Aim The distinct nature of island populations has traditionally been attributed either to adaptation to particular insular conditions or to random genetic effects. In order to assess the relative ... [more ▼]

Aim The distinct nature of island populations has traditionally been attributed either to adaptation to particular insular conditions or to random genetic effects. In order to assess the relative importance of these two disparate processes, insular effects were addressed in the European wood mouse, Apodemus sylvaticus (Linnaeus, 1758). Location Wood mice from 33 localities on both mainland and various Atlantic and western Mediterranean islands were considered. This sampling covers only part of the latitudinal range of A. sylvaticus but included the two main genetic clades identified by previous studies. Islands encompass a range of geographical conditions (e.g. small islands fringing the continent through large and isolated ones). Methods The insular syndrome primarily invokes variations in body size, but ecological factors such as release from competition, niche widening and food availability should also influence other characters related to diet. In the present study, the morphology of the wood mice was quantified based on two characters involved in feeding: the size and shape of the mandibles and first upper molars. The size of the mandible is also a proxy for the body size of the animal. Patterns of morphological differentiation of both features were estimated using twodimensional outline analysis based on Fourier methods. Results Significant differences between mainland and island populations were observed in most cases for both the mandibles and molars. However, molars and mandibles displayed divergent patterns. Mandible shape diverged mostly on islands of intermediate remoteness and competition levels, whereas molars exhibited the greatest shape differentiation on small islands, such as Port-Cros and Porquerolles. A mosaic pattern was also displayed for size. Body and mandible size increased on Ibiza, but molar size remained similar to mainland populations. Mosaic patterns were, however, not apparent in the mainland populations. Congruent latitudinal variations were evident for the size and shape of both mandibles and molars. Main conclusions Mosaic evolution appears to characterize insular divergence. The molar seems to be more prone to change with reduced population size on small islands, whereas the mandible could be more sensitive to peculiar environmental conditions on large and remote islands. [less ▲]

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See detailMandibular osteodistraction as a corrective method for class II malocclusions in the horse.
Verwilghen, Denis; Van Galen, Gaby; Busoni, Valeria ULg et al

Poster (2008, July)

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See detailMandibular osteodistraction for correction of deep bite class II malocclusion in a horse
Verwilghen, Denis ULg; Van Galen, Gaby ULg; Vander Heyden, Laurent ULg et al

in Veterinary Surgery : The Official Journal of the American College of Veterinary Surgeons (2008), 37(6), 571-579

Detailed reference viewed: 71 (13 ULg)