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See detailLunettes et télescopes, l'Univers se dévoile
Jaminon, Martine ULg; Nazé, Yaël ULg; Taton, Fabrice

Learning material (2009)

Plaquette de l'exposition "Lunettes et Télescopes : l'Univers se dévoile" + animations flash illustrant la réflexion par des miroirs sphériques et la réfraction par des lentilles divergentes et ... [more ▼]

Plaquette de l'exposition "Lunettes et Télescopes : l'Univers se dévoile" + animations flash illustrant la réflexion par des miroirs sphériques et la réfraction par des lentilles divergentes et convergentes. [less ▲]

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See detaillung compliance and resistance in premature and term neonates
Battisti, Oreste ULg; bertrand, jean-marie; rouatbi, hatem et al

in Pediatrics & Therapeutics: Current Research (2012)

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See detailLung disorders in dogs and cats
Clercx, Cécile ULg

Scientific conference (2012, January)

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See detailLung Fibrosis in dogs - News about genetic background, pathology, diagnostics and therapy
Clercx, Cécile ULg

in Proceedings of 58th Annual Conference of GSAVA in Duesseldorf, Germany (2012, October 20)

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See detailLung fluid balance and septic shock
D'Orio, Vincenzo ULg; WAHLEN, C; RODRIGUEZ, LM et al

in Chicago (1975) (1989)

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See detailLung fluid balance during recovery of appropriate supply-oxygen uptake ratio with volume loading in septic shock dogs
D'Orio, Vincenzo ULg; FATEMI, M; MENDES, P et al

in American Review of Respiratory Disease (1991), 143

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See detailLung Fluid Dynamics and Supply Dependency of Oxygen Uptake During Experimental Endotoxic Shock and Volume Resuscitation
D'Orio, Vincenzo ULg; Mendes, P.; Carlier, Pierre ULg et al

in Critical Care Medicine (1991), 19(7), 955-62

BACKGROUND AND METHODS: We studied the effect of volume resuscitation on lung fluid balance and systemic oxygen extraction during septic shock in eight anesthetized dogs. Sepsis was induced using a 2-hr ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND AND METHODS: We studied the effect of volume resuscitation on lung fluid balance and systemic oxygen extraction during septic shock in eight anesthetized dogs. Sepsis was induced using a 2-hr continuous infusion of Escherichia coli endotoxin at 0.25 micrograms/min.kg. Relationships between oxygen uptake (VO2) and oxygen supply (DO2) were performed acutely during stepwise controlled decrements in cardiac output by progressive inflation of an intracardiac balloon. At each stage, DO2 and corresponding VO2 were measured independently and the individual critical DO2 level was referred to as the point below which the relationship held. The slope of such a constructed relationship was defined as the maximal oxygen extraction ratio. Lung fluid balance was assessed by measurements of extravascular lung water. All values were studied at baseline, after endotoxin insult, and after reversing hypotension by a 10% dextran infusion. RESULTS: Endotoxin infusion led to a shock state that associated hypotension (from 135 to 63 mm Hg) with increases in blood lactate (from 0.53 to 3.9 mmol/L). The mean critical DO2 and maximal oxygen extraction ratio were significantly altered from 7.9 to 17.8 mL/min.kg and from 0.81 to 0.38, respectively. After reversing hypotension by 28 mL/kg colloid infusion, the critical DO2 (11.4 mL/min.kg) and maximal oxygen extraction ratio (0.48) were significantly improved. However, restoration of normal values required a state of fluid overload by further dextran infusion (8 mL/kg). At the end of the fluid challenge, extravascular lung water significantly increased from 6.4 to 17.4 mL/kg. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that volume loading may reverse endotoxin-induced peripheral perfusion abnormalities. However, substantial pulmonary edema may occur, possibly jeopardizing the beneficial effects of fluid expansion. [less ▲]

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See detailLung function and airway inflammation monitoring after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.
Moermans, Catherine ULg; Poulet, Christophe ULg; HENKET, Monique ULg et al

in Respiratory Medicine (2013), 107

Background Induced sputum is a non-invasive method to investigate airway inflammation, which has been used to assess pulmonary inflammatory diseases. However, this procedure has not been studied in the ... [more ▼]

Background Induced sputum is a non-invasive method to investigate airway inflammation, which has been used to assess pulmonary inflammatory diseases. However, this procedure has not been studied in the context of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Methods We monitored lung function in 182 patients who underwent HSCT and measured airway inflammation by sputum induction in 80 of them. We prospectively measured FEV1, FVC, DLCO, KCO, TLC, RV, exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) as well as sputum cell counts before and 3, 6, 12, 24 and 36 months after HSCT. Results For the whole cohort there was a progressive decrease in TLC, which was significant after 3 years (p < 0.01). By contrast, there was no change in other lung functions parameters or in FeNO. Baseline sputum analysis revealed increased neutrophil counts in patients {Median (IQR): 63% (38–79)} compared to healthy subjects matched for age {Median (IQR): 49% (17–67), p < 0.001} but there was no significant change in any type of sputum cell counts over the three years. When comparing myeloablative (MA) vs non-myeloablative (NMA) conditioning, falls in FEV1, FVC and DLCO, and rise in RV and sputum neutrophils were more pronounced over the first year of observation in those receiving MA. Conclusions There was a progressive loss in lung function after HSCT, featuring a restrictive pattern. Myeloablative conditioning was associated with early rise of sputum neutrophils and greater alteration in lung function over the first year. [less ▲]

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See detailLung inflammation and thrombogenic responses in a time course study of Csb mice exposed to ozone.
Kooter, Ingeborg M; Frederix, Kim ULg; Spronk, Henri M H et al

in Journal of Applied Toxicology (2008), 28(6), 779-87

Ozone is a well-known oxidant air pollutant, inhalation of which can result in oxidative stress, and lead to pulmonary inflammation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the time-course events after a ... [more ▼]

Ozone is a well-known oxidant air pollutant, inhalation of which can result in oxidative stress, and lead to pulmonary inflammation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the time-course events after a single ozone exposure in transcription-coupled repair defective Csb and wild type mice. Mice were exposed for 3 h to 2 ppm ozone and biological parameters related to oxidative stress and inflammation were examined in the lungs at 0, 4, 9, 24 and 48 h after exposure. In addition the procoagulant and thrombomodulin activities were explored by a combination of assays for tissue factor and thrombin generation.This study revealed a significant biological response to ozone, for both Csb and wild type mice. The onset of inflammation in Csb mice, as indicated by an increase in interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and total cell influx, occurred earlier compared with those seen in wild type mice. On the other hand, Csb mice showed a delayed antioxidant reaction compared with wild type mice. Both genotypes developed a procoagulant reaction characterized by a stably increased tissue factor activity and a progressive increase in thrombin generation after 2 days.These experiments have shown that ozone, a well-known toxic substance from the environment, induces not only inflammation, but also procoagulant reactions in the lungs of mice. These results have implications for understanding the systemic effects induced by oxidant air pollutants. [less ▲]

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See detailLung interstitial macrophages alter dendritic cell functions to prevent airway allergy in mice
Bedoret, Denis ULg; Wallemacq, Hugues ULg; Marichal, Thomas ULg et al

in Journal of Clinical Investigation (2009), 119(12), 3723-38

The respiratory tract is continuously exposed to both innocuous airborne antigens and immunostimulatory molecules of microbial origin, such as LPS. At low concentrations, airborne LPS can induce a lung DC ... [more ▼]

The respiratory tract is continuously exposed to both innocuous airborne antigens and immunostimulatory molecules of microbial origin, such as LPS. At low concentrations, airborne LPS can induce a lung DC-driven Th2 cell response to harmless inhaled antigens, thereby promoting allergic asthma. However, only a small fraction of people exposed to environmental LPS develop allergic asthma. What prevents most people from mounting a lung DC-driven Th2 response upon exposure to LPS is not understood. Here we have shown that lung interstitial macrophages (IMs), a cell population with no previously described in vivo function, prevent induction of a Th2 response in mice challenged with LPS and an experimental harmless airborne antigen. IMs, but not alveolar macrophages, were found to produce high levels of IL-10 and to inhibit LPS-induced maturation and migration of DCs loaded with the experimental harmless airborne antigen in an IL-10-dependent manner. We further demonstrated that specific in vivo elimination of IMs led to overt asthmatic reactions to innocuous airborne antigens inhaled with low doses of LPS. This study has revealed a crucial role for IMs in maintaining immune homeostasis in the respiratory tract and provides an explanation for the paradox that although airborne LPS has the ability to promote the induction of Th2 responses by lung DCs, it does not provoke airway allergy under normal conditions. [less ▲]

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See detailLung interstitial macrophages prevent lipopolysaccharide-triggered T helper type 2 responses to harmless inhaled antigens
Bedoret, D.; Wallemacq, Hugues ULg; Marichal, Thomas ULg et al

in Proceedings of the Annual BIS-meeting (2008)

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See detailLung interstitial macrophages prevent the development of respiratory allergy
Bedoret, D.; Wallemacq, Hugues ULg; Marichal, Thomas ULg et al

in Proceedings of The Keystone Symposia: Allergy and Asthma. Keystone, Colorado, USA (2009)

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See detailLung scanning in calves using technegas
Votion, Dominique ULg; Coghe, J.; Lekeux, Pierre ULg

in Plügers Archives European Journal of Physiology (1998)

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See detailLung-resident CD4 T cells are sufficient for IL-4Ralpha-dependent recall immunity to Nippostrongylus brasiliensis infection.
Thawer, S. G.; Horsnell, W. Gc; Darby, M. et al

in Mucosal Immunology (2013)

Immunity to Nippostrongylus brasiliensis reinfection requires pulmonary CD4+ T-cell responses. We examined whether secondary lymphoid recruited or pre-existing lung CD4+ T-cell populations coordinated ... [more ▼]

Immunity to Nippostrongylus brasiliensis reinfection requires pulmonary CD4+ T-cell responses. We examined whether secondary lymphoid recruited or pre-existing lung CD4+ T-cell populations coordinated this immunity. To do this, we blocked T-cell egress from lymph nodes using Fingolimod (FTY720). This impaired host ability to resolve a primary infection but did not change effectiveness of recall immunity. Associated with this effective recall immunity was the expansion and T helper type 2 polarization of a pre-existing pulmonary CD4+ T-cell population. LTbetaR-Ig (lymphotoxin beta-receptor fusion protein)-mediated disruption of stromal cell organization of immune cells did not disrupt this recall immunity, suggesting that protection was mediated by a pulmonary interstitial residing CD4+ T-cell population. Adoptive transfer of N. brasiliensis-experienced pulmonary CD4+ T cells from FTY720-treated wild-type or T-cell interleukin (IL)-4Ralpha-deficient mice demonstrated protection to be IL-4Ralpha dependent. These results show that pre-existing CD4+ T cells can drive effective recall immunity to N. brasiliensis infection independently of T-cell recruitment from secondary lymphoid organs.Mucosal Immunology advance online publication 19 June 2013; doi:10.1038/mi.2013.40. [less ▲]

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See detailLungenfibrose
Clercx, Cécile ULg

in Proceedings of the 34. Internationaler Fortbildungskurs Kleintierkrankheiten : “Thorax – Herz- und Lungenerkrankungen" - Flims -Switzerland (2013, February)

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See detailLUPA: a European initiative taking advantage of the canine genome architecture for unravelling complex disorders in both human and dogs.
Lequarré, Anne-Sophie ULg; Andersson, Leif; Andre, Catherine et al

in Veterinary Journal (2011), 189(2), 155-9

The domestic dog offers a unique opportunity to explore the genetic basis of disease, morphology and behaviour. Humans share many diseases with our canine companions, making dogs an ideal model organism ... [more ▼]

The domestic dog offers a unique opportunity to explore the genetic basis of disease, morphology and behaviour. Humans share many diseases with our canine companions, making dogs an ideal model organism for comparative disease genetics. Using newly developed resources, genome-wide association studies in dog breeds are proving to be exceptionally powerful. Towards this aim, veterinarians and geneticists from 12 European countries are collaborating to collect and analyse the DNA from large cohorts of dogs suffering from a range of carefully defined diseases of relevance to human health. This project, named LUPA, has already delivered considerable results. The consortium has collaborated to develop a new high density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array. Mutations for four monogenic diseases have been identified and the information has been utilised to find mutations in human patients. Several complex diseases have been mapped and fine mapping is underway. These findings should ultimately lead to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying complex diseases in both humans and their best friend. [less ▲]

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See detailLe lupin : ses aspects nutritionnels et son intégration dans les rations des ruminants
Beckers, Yves ULg; Froidmont, Eric

Conference given outside the academic context (2009)

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See detailLupin seeds as a substitute to soybean in broiler chiken feeding : incorporation level and enzyme preparation effects on performances, digestibility and meat composition.
Froidmont, Eric; Beckers, Yves ULg; Dehareng, frédéric et al

in 55th Meeting of European Association of Animal Production (2004, September)

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See detailLe lupus érythémateux systémique
Malaise, Michel ULg

in Revue Médicale de Liège (1992), 47(10), 481-501

Detailed reference viewed: 7 (4 ULg)