Browsing
     by title


0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

or enter first few letters:   
OK
See detailHors-cadres : des images qui manquent. Quand le documentaire ne peut pas tout montrer.
Hamers, Jérémy ULg

Conference given outside the academic context (2014)

Detailed reference viewed: 25 (1 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailHorse production
Lekeux, Pierre ULg; Art, Tatiana ULg

in Proceedings: 53rd Annual Meeting of the European Association for Animal Production (2002)

Detailed reference viewed: 16 (0 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailHorseradish peroxidase electrode for phenothiazine analysis
Petit, C.; Quilinc, A.; Quilinc, E. et al

in Electroanalysis (1998), 10

Detailed reference viewed: 18 (10 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHorses on pasture may be affected by equine motor neuron disease
McGorum, B. C.; Mayhew, I. G.; Amory, Hélène ULg et al

in Equine Veterinary Journal (2006), 38(1), 47-51

Reasons for performing study: Equine motor neuron disease (EMND) was diagnosed in 3 horses maintained on lush, grass-based pasture. This contrasted with North American studies which identified limited or ... [more ▼]

Reasons for performing study: Equine motor neuron disease (EMND) was diagnosed in 3 horses maintained on lush, grass-based pasture. This contrasted with North American studies which identified limited or no access to green herbage as an important risk factor for EMND. Hypothesis: Grazing horses that have an apparently adequate intake of pasture herbage to meet normal equine vitamin E requirements can develop EMND. Methods: Owners of 32 European horses diagnosed with EMND completed a questionnaire regarding intrinsic, managemental, nutritional and environmental factors that could potentially be risk factors for EMND, and also regarding clinical signs, treatments and case outcome. Plasma/serum vitamin E data for these horses were supplied by the veterinarians. No control population was studied. Results: Thirteen of 32 horses (termed the 'grazing' group) had part- or full-time access to grass-based pasture at the onset of EMND (median duration at pasture 12 h/day, range 3-24 h). Five of these horses were at pasture for at least 23.5 h/day at the onset of EMND, 2 of which were at pasture for at least 23.5 h/day throughout the year. Despite grazing, all these horses had a low vitamin E status. The remaining 19 horses resembled those cases reported from North America, in that they had no or limited access to pasture. Conclusions and potential relevance: A diagnosis of EMND should not be discounted on the basis that a horse has access, even full-time, to lush grass-based pasture. Inadequate vitamin E intake was probably not the sole cause of either the EMND or the low vitamin E status in the grazing horses; the latter was probably the result of abnormal bioavailability or excessive utilisation of vitamin E. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 14 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHorseshoeing styles comparison and detection of subclinic equine digit discomfort during movement
Noble, Prisca ULg; Lejeune, Jean-Philippe ULg; Serteyn, Didier ULg et al

Conference (2011, July 07)

Introduction: For the sound equine forelimb, ground reaction force (GRF) peaks to ~0.8-1 BodyWeight (BW) during the trot (4m/s). Little work investigates the effect of different horsehoeing styles ... [more ▼]

Introduction: For the sound equine forelimb, ground reaction force (GRF) peaks to ~0.8-1 BodyWeight (BW) during the trot (4m/s). Little work investigates the effect of different horsehoeing styles, directly on the limb GRF distribution and indirectly on the equine digit comfort during movement. This study investigates GRF distribution after application of different aluminium horseshoeing styles during movement. Methods: Two horses (H1,H2; mean 575kg) were used. However H2 had an old healed flexor tendons lesion, the horses were judged to be sound on locomotor examination (without lameness). According to the rules that respect the foot biomechanical balance, they were trimmed and shod with a non-broken foot-pastern axis. On the day of the tests, they were led on a treadmill at a trot (4m/s). Kinetics were collected, using a F-Scan system, during 3 following sessions : to both forehooves after application of classic roller, eggbarr and equi+ horseshoes. For each session, data from 3 strides for each left forelimb of each horse were averaged and kinetics (GRF) were obtained. Results: For the classic roller, eggbarr and equi+ horseshoes, GRF peaked respectively to 0.57+-0.006;0.36+-0.005;0.83+-0.009BW for H1 and 0.61+-0.007;0.84+-0.007;0.51+-0.009BW for H2. Theses horseshoes loading differences show a dynamic load transfer from the forelimbs to the hindlimbs, that is the result of a subclinic (without lameness) equine digit discomfort during movement. Conclusions: Subclinic equine digit discomfort after application of horshoes has been detected using the F-Scan system during movement. These results confirm the interest of the equi+ horseshoes on horses without flexor tendon lesion. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 83 (14 ULg)
See detailHorus sur les crocodiles
Winand, Jean ULg; Koemoth, Pierre

in Derriks, Claire; Delvaux, Luc (Eds.) Antiquités égyptiennes au Musée royal de Mariemont (2009)

Detailed reference viewed: 52 (4 ULg)
See detailHosios - A Semantic Study of Greek Piety
Peels, Saskia ULg

Book published by Brill, Mnemosyne Supplements (2016)

In HOSIOS – A Semantic Study of Greek Piety Saskia Peels elucidates the semantics of the Ancient Greek adjective hosios and its cognates. Traditionally rendered as ‘piety’, hosios was a key notion in ... [more ▼]

In HOSIOS – A Semantic Study of Greek Piety Saskia Peels elucidates the semantics of the Ancient Greek adjective hosios and its cognates. Traditionally rendered as ‘piety’, hosios was a key notion in Classical Greek religion and reflected a core value in Athenian democracy. Since antiquity, its meaning and usage have puzzled many. This study sets out to resolve various scholarly debates on the semantics of hosios by focusing on the idea of lexical competition. It illuminates the semantic relationship between hosios and its near-synonyms eusebês and dikaios, and the connection to the notion of the ‘sacred’. Using insights from modern linguistic theory, the book also aims to improve methods for research into the lexical semantics of a dead language. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 74 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHospital outbreak of gastroenteritis due to norovirus in Belgium
Verbelen, V.; Bodeus, Monique; Garrino, M. G. et al

in Acta Clinica Belgica (2004), 59(1, JAN-FEB), 30-33

We report an outbreak of gastroenteritis due to Norovirus in a care unit in a Belgian hospital involving thirty-three people. The origin of the outbreak was traced to one nursing assistant. The virus ... [more ▼]

We report an outbreak of gastroenteritis due to Norovirus in a care unit in a Belgian hospital involving thirty-three people. The origin of the outbreak was traced to one nursing assistant. The virus strain identified by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and electron microscopy belonged to the genogroup II. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 99 (13 ULg)
Full Text
See detailL'Hospitalisation à domicile. Un choix qui se précise.
Jamoulle, Marc ULg

in Actualité Santé GERM (1985), (72), 20-24

Etude sur la charge d'organisation de la prise en charge coordonnée à domicile de patients sévèrement malades. Données économiques sur 300 jours.

Detailed reference viewed: 40 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHospitalisation costs of hip fractures in Belgium
Hiligsmann, Mickaël ULg; Gathon, Henry-Jean ULg; Bruyère, Olivier ULg et al

in Osteoporosis International (2011, March), 22(Suppl.1), 332

Detailed reference viewed: 58 (9 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailL’hospitalisation sous contrainte : Urgences psychiatriques et mises en observation.
Schmits, Emilie ULg; Evrard, Maude; Valassopoulou, Eftychia et al

Poster (2017, May)

Detailed reference viewed: 21 (1 ULg)
Full Text
See detailL'hospitalité chez Jacques Derrida
Petteni, Oriane ULg

Scientific conference (2012, November 20)

Detailed reference viewed: 15 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHost DNA released by NETosis promotes rhinovirus-induced type-2 allergic asthma exacerbation.
Toussaint, Marie; Jackson, David J.; Swieboda, Dawid et al

in Nature Medicine (2017), 23

Respiratory viral infections represent the most common cause of allergic asthma exacerbations. Amplification of the type-2 immune response is strongly implicated in asthma exacerbation, but how virus ... [more ▼]

Respiratory viral infections represent the most common cause of allergic asthma exacerbations. Amplification of the type-2 immune response is strongly implicated in asthma exacerbation, but how virus infection boosts type-2 responses is poorly understood. We report a significant correlation between the release of host double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) following rhinovirus infection and the exacerbation of type-2 allergic inflammation in humans. In a mouse model of allergic airway hypersensitivity, we show that rhinovirus infection triggers dsDNA release associated with the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), known as NETosis. We further demonstrate that inhibiting NETosis by blocking neutrophil elastase or by degrading NETs with DNase protects mice from type-2 immunopathology. Furthermore, the injection of mouse genomic DNA alone is sufficient to recapitulate many features of rhinovirus-induced type-2 immune responses and asthma pathology. Thus, NETosis and its associated extracellular dsDNA contribute to the pathogenesis and may represent potential therapeutic targets of rhinovirus-induced asthma exacerbations. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 18 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHost entry by gamma-herpesviruses-lessons from animal viruses?
Gillet, Laurent ULg; Frederico, Bruno; Stevenson, Philip G.

in Current Opinion in Virology (2015), 15

The oncogenicity of gamma-herpesviruses (gammaHVs) motivates efforts to control them and their persistence makes early events key targets for intervention. Human gammaHVs are often assumed to enter naive ... [more ▼]

The oncogenicity of gamma-herpesviruses (gammaHVs) motivates efforts to control them and their persistence makes early events key targets for intervention. Human gammaHVs are often assumed to enter naive hosts orally and infect B cells directly. However, neither assumption is supported by direct evidence, and vaccination with the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) gp350, to block virion binding to B cells, failed to reduce infection rates. Thus, there is a need to re-evaluate assumptions about gammaHV host entry. Given the difficulty of analysing early human infections, potentially much can be learned from animal models. Genomic comparisons argue that gammaHVs colonized mammals long before humans speciation, and so that human gammaHVs are unlikely to differ dramatically in behaviour from those of other mammals. Murid Herpesvirus-4 (MuHV-4), which like EBV and the Kaposi's Sarcoma-associated Herpesvirus (KSHV) persists in memory B cells, enters new hosts via olfactory neurons and exploits myeloid cells to spread. Integrating these data with existing knowledge of human and veterinary gammaHVs suggests a new model of host entry, with potentially important implications for infection control. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 47 (9 ULg)
Full Text
See detailThe Host Galaxies of the Brightest Quasars: Gas-Rich Galaxies, Mergers, and Young Stars
Courbin, Frédéric; Letawe, Géraldine ULg; Meylan, Georges et al

in The Messenger (2006), 124

Because they are faint and hidden in the glare of a much brighter unresolved source, quasar host galaxies still challenge the most powerful telescopes, instrumentation and processing techniques ... [more ▼]

Because they are faint and hidden in the glare of a much brighter unresolved source, quasar host galaxies still challenge the most powerful telescopes, instrumentation and processing techniques. Determining their basic morphological parameters and their integrated colours is feasible, but difficult, from imaging alone. However, detailed information on their stellar and gas contents and on their dynamics is achievable with deep spectroscopy. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 22 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe host genomic environment of the provirus determines the abundance of HTLV-1-infected T-cell clones.
Gillet, Nicolas ULg; Malani, Nirav; Melamed, Anat et al

in Blood (2011), 117(11), 3113-22

Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) persists by driving clonal proliferation of infected T lymphocytes. A high proviral load predisposes to HTLV-1-associated diseases. Yet the reasons for the ... [more ▼]

Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) persists by driving clonal proliferation of infected T lymphocytes. A high proviral load predisposes to HTLV-1-associated diseases. Yet the reasons for the variation within and between persons in the abundance of HTLV-1-infected clones remain unknown. We devised a high-throughput protocol to map the genomic location and quantify the abundance of > 91,000 unique insertion sites of the provirus from 61 HTLV-1(+) persons and > 2100 sites from in vitro infection. We show that a typical HTLV-1-infected host carries between 500 and 5000 unique insertion sites. We demonstrate that negative selection dominates during chronic infection, favoring establishment of proviruses integrated in transcriptionally silenced DNA: this selection is significantly stronger in asymptomatic carriers. We define a parameter, the oligoclonality index, to quantify clonality. The high proviral load characteristic of HTLV-1-associated inflammatory disease results from a larger number of unique insertion sites than in asymptomatic carriers and not, as previously thought, from a difference in clonality. The abundance of established HTLV-1 clones is determined by genomic features of the host DNA flanking the provirus. HTLV-1 clonal expansion in vivo is favored by orientation of the provirus in the same sense as the nearest host gene. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 13 (6 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHost Interleukin 6 and Indoleamine 2,3 Dioxygenase Regulate Inflammation in the Brain during Graft Versus Host Disease
Belle, Ludovic ULg; Koester, E; Hansen, E et al

in Blood (2016, December), 128

Graft versus host disease (GVHD) commonly induces pathological damage in peripheral target organs such as the skin, liver and gastrointestinal tract leading to well characterized organ-specific clinical ... [more ▼]

Graft versus host disease (GVHD) commonly induces pathological damage in peripheral target organs such as the skin, liver and gastrointestinal tract leading to well characterized organ-specific clinical manifestations. A number of studies, however, have shown that patients with GVHD can also have behavioral and mood alterations that can affect overall cognitive function and lead to significant impairments in quality of life. The extent to which GVHD contributes to cognitive dysfunction and induces inflammation within the central nervous system (CNS), however, has not been critically examined. To address this question, we conducted studies using two well-defined murine GVHD models [C57BL/6(H-2b)→Balb/c (H-2d) and B10.BR(H-2k)→B6 (H-2b)]. We observed that there was a significant increase in the number of donor-derived CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in the brains of GVHD recipients early (days 7 -14) and late (day 42) post transplantation compared to BM controls. Histological studies revealed activated microglial cells and CD3+ T cell infiltration in the periventricular regions of brains in GVHD recipients that were not present in BM animals. Real time q-PCR analysis also demonstrated significant increases in IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-6 mRNA expression indicative of a proinflammatory state. Notably, GVHD animals exhibited behavioral changes in the forced swim test and elevated plus maze which are validated assays of stress coping and anxiety, respectively. Since IL-6, in particular, plays a pivotal role in GVHD pathogenesis in murine models and humans, we examined whether blockade of IL-6 signaling altered neuroinflammation. Animals treated with an anti-IL-6R antibody had a significant reduction in the number of donor-derived CD4+ and CD8+T cells in the brain compared to isotype control-treated mice. Anti-IL-6R treatment of GVHD mice also resulted in significant reductions in IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-6 mRNA and normalized behavior in the forced swim test, indicative of a decreased inflammatory response. Since IL-6 is produced by a wide variety of cells, including microglial and T cells, both donor and recipient cells have the potential to modulate GVHD severity within the CNS. To define whether donor or host IL-6 production was most critical for inducing neuroinflammation, experiments were conducted employing IL-6-/- mice as either donors or recipients. Whereas the absence of IL-6 in donor-derived cells had no impact on the degree of inflammation within the CNS, recipient animals that lacked IL-6 had a significant decrease in the number of donor-derived T cells which accumulated in the brain as well as a marked reduction in inflammatory cytokines, indicating that host IL-6 production was critical. To define the downstream pathways of IL-6-mediated CNS inflammation, we examined the role of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) since IL-6 has been shown to upregulate IDO-1 expression under inflammatory conditions. We observed that IDO-1 mRNA levels were significantly increased in the brains of GVHD animals, and that blockade of IL-6 signaling resulted in a marked decrease in IDO mRNA levels. Additionally, transplantation studies using IDO-/- mice revealed that host, but not donor, IDO production was required for maximal inflammatory effects. Serotoninergic projections to the prefrontal cortex (PFC), in particular, are sensitive to inflammation and contribute to stress coping behavior. Therefore, to further interrogate this pathway, we performed quantitative mass spectrometry of brain extracts from the PFC. We found that tryptophan and 5HT concentrations were not different between BM and GVHD groups. However, there was an increase in the IDO product, kynurenic acid, in GVHD recipients consistent with an increase in brain IDO expression. To provide additional support for the premise that IL-6 effects were mediated through the IDO pathway, recipient mice were treated with either 1-methyltryptophan (1-MT), a completive inhibitor of IDO, or a vehicle control. GVHD mice treated with 1-MT had decreased accumulation of T cells in the brain and normal behavior in the forced swim test, demonstrating that inhibition of IDO abrogated CNS inflammation and behavioral changes in the presence of intact IL-6 signaling. In summary, these studies demonstrate that host IL-6 and IDO regulate inflammation and adversely impact behavioral function within the brain during GVHD through the tryptophan metabolic pathway. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 22 (1 ULg)