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See detailMémoires du livre / Studies in Book Culture, I-1 : La publication électronique en sciences humaines et sociales
Dozo, Björn-Olav ULg; Vachon, Karine

Book published by Groupe de recherche sur l'édition littéraire au Québec (2009)

Detailed reference viewed: 11 (3 ULg)
See detailMémoires et imaginaires
Jamin, Jérôme ULg

Conference given outside the academic context (2007)

Detailed reference viewed: 2 (0 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailMemories of Near-Death experiences are they memories of imagined events?
Thonnard, Marie ULg; Charland-Verville, Vanessa ULg; Brédart, Serge ULg et al

Poster (2012, October 27)

Background: The phenomenon of Near-Death Experiences (NDEs) has always intrigued but is still not fully explained despite numerous theories and studies. Since reports of NDEs are proposed to be imagined ... [more ▼]

Background: The phenomenon of Near-Death Experiences (NDEs) has always intrigued but is still not fully explained despite numerous theories and studies. Since reports of NDEs are proposed to be imagined events (French, 2001), and since memories of imagined events have, on average, fewer phenomenological characteristics than real event memories (e.g. Johnson et al., 1988), we here compared phenomenological characteristics of NDEs reports with memories of imagined and real events. Methods: We included 3 groups of coma survivors (8 patients with NDE as defined by the Greyson NDE scale – the “NDE memory group”- , 6 patients without NDE but with memory of their coma – the “coma memory group” – and 7 patients without memories of their coma – the “no memory group”) and a group of 18 age-matched healthy volunteers. Five memories were assessed using Memory Characteristics Questionnaire (MCQ – Johnson et al., 1988): target memory (NDE for NDE memory group, coma memory for coma memory group, and first childhood memory for no memory and control groups), old and recent real event memories and old and recent imagined event memories. Results: In NDE group, NDE memories showd more characteristics than memories of imagined and real events (p<0.02). These memories contain more self-referential and emotional information and have better clarity than memories of coma (all p<0.02). Conclusion: The present study showed that NDE memories contain more characteristics than real event memories and coma memories. Thus, they cannot be considered as classic imagined event memories. On the contrary, their physiological origins could lead them to be really perceived although not lived in the reality. Further work is needed to better understand this phenomenon [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 146 (17 ULg)
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See detailMémorisation et autorépétition chez des adultes porteurs d’une trisomie 21
Frenkel, Stéphanie ULg; Bourdin, Béatrice; Vandromme, Luc

Conference (1998)

Detailed reference viewed: 31 (2 ULg)
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See detailMemory disorders in children
Majerus, Steve ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg

in Handbook of Clinical Neurology (2013), 111

Memory disorders are a frequent consequence of a variety of childhood neurological conditions. We will review the characteristics of memory disorders as a function of the main four memory systems: short ... [more ▼]

Memory disorders are a frequent consequence of a variety of childhood neurological conditions. We will review the characteristics of memory disorders as a function of the main four memory systems: short-term memory, episodic memory, semantic memory, and procedural memory. For each system, we will identify the most typical cerebral and/or genetic correlates, and we will discuss the impact of impairment of each memory system on everyday life functioning. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. [less ▲]

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See detailMemory disturbances and dexamethasone suppression test in major depression
WAUTHY, Jacques ULg; Ansseau, Marc ULg; Von, Frenckell et al

in Biological Psychiatry (1991), 30(7), 736-738

Assessed the relationships between hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) activity and memory performance using 16 inpatients (mean age 45.9 yrs) with major depressive syndrome and a memory profile developed ... [more ▼]

Assessed the relationships between hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) activity and memory performance using 16 inpatients (mean age 45.9 yrs) with major depressive syndrome and a memory profile developed by A. Rey (1966). Within 2 wks following hospital admission, HPA assessments (both basal and post dexamethasone suppression test [DST] cortisol levels) and the memory profile were administered. Results suggest that HPA assessments including both basal and post-DST cortisol levels are better correlated with memory processes than isolated post-DST levels. [less ▲]

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See detailMemory Efficient Algorithms for the Verification of Temporal Properties
Courcoubetis, Constantin; Vardi, Moshe Y; Wolper, Pierre ULg et al

in Formal Methods in System Design (1992), 1

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See detailMemory evaluation with a new cued recall test in patients with mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease
Ivanoiu, Adrian; Adam, Stéphane ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg et al

in Journal of Neurology (2005), 252(1), 47-55

Free delayed recall is considered the memory measure with the greatest sensitivity for the early diagnosis of dementia. However, its specificity for dementia could be lower, as deficits other than those ... [more ▼]

Free delayed recall is considered the memory measure with the greatest sensitivity for the early diagnosis of dementia. However, its specificity for dementia could be lower, as deficits other than those of pure memory might account for poor performance in this difficult and effortful task. Cued recall is supposed to allow a better distinction between poor memory due to concurrent factors and impairments related to the neurodegenerative process. The available cued recall tests suffer from a ceiling effect. This is a prospective, longitudinal study aiming to assess the utility of a new memory test based on cued recall that avoids the ceiling effect in the early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Twenty-five patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), 22 probable AD patients ( NINCDS-ADRDA) at a mild stage, 22 elderly patients with subjective memory complaints (SMC) and 38 normal age-matched controls took part in the study. The patients underwent a thorough cognitive evaluation and the recommended screening procedure for the diagnosis of dementia. All patients were re-examined 12 - 18 months later. A newly devised delayed cued recall test using semantic cues ( The RI48 Test) was compared with three established memory tests: the Ten Word-List Recall from CERAD, the "Doors" and the "Shapes" Tests from "The Doors and People Test Battery". Forty-four % of the MCI patients fulfilled criteria for probable AD at follow-up. The RI48 Test classified correctly 88% of the MCI and SMC participants and was the best predictor of the status of MCI and mild AD as well as the outcome of the MCI patients. Poor visual memory was the second best predictor of those MCI patients who evolved to AD. A cued recall test which avoids the ceiling effect is at least as good as the delayed free recall tests in the early detection of AD. [less ▲]

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See detailMemory for temporal context : Effects of aging, encoding instructions and retrieval strategies
Bastin, Christine ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg

in Memory (2005), 13(1), 95-109

Young and older adults were compared on a list discrimination task. In Experiment 1, performance declined with aging after incidental and intentional encoding of the temporal context. Moreover, there was ... [more ▼]

Young and older adults were compared on a list discrimination task. In Experiment 1, performance declined with aging after incidental and intentional encoding of the temporal context. Moreover, there was no benefit for intentional encoding in either group. In Experiment 2, each list was associated with a different encoding context. There were age differences in performance when participants tried to retrieve the encoding context of the items as a cue for their list of occurrence, but not when participants evaluated temporal distance from the strength of the memory trace. This suggests that the age-related decrease in list discrimination could be at least partly due to a difficulty to infer strategically the temporal context of the items from information encoded in the same time. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 35 (3 ULg)
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See detailMemory for temporal context: Effects of aging and encoding conditions
Bastin, Christine ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg; Hogge, Michael

in Proceedings of the XII Conference of the European Society for Cognitive Psychology and XVIII Annual Conference of the British Psychological Society (2001)

Whether the memory for temporal context information is mediated by automatic or controlled processes is a matter of debate. If the coding of temporal context information is automatic, memory for temporal ... [more ▼]

Whether the memory for temporal context information is mediated by automatic or controlled processes is a matter of debate. If the coding of temporal context information is automatic, memory for temporal context should not be affected by intention to learn and aging. In order to address this issue, we administered a list discrimination task to young and older adults in either an incidental or an intentional encoding condition. The results showed that the list discrimination performance of the older adults was inferior to the performance of the young subjects. In addition, both young and older subjects’ discrimination performance did not improve in the intentional encoding condition. These results support the hypotheses that the temporal context of an item is encoded automatically. [less ▲]

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See detailMemory for temporal context: Effects of aging and retrieval strategies
Bastin, Christine ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg

in Proceedings of the International Conference Binding in Human Memory: A neurocognitive approach (2002)

The purpose of the present study was to re-explore the effects of age on memory for temporal context, assessed by a list discrimination task. Contrary to previous studies, each list (with faces as stimuli ... [more ▼]

The purpose of the present study was to re-explore the effects of age on memory for temporal context, assessed by a list discrimination task. Contrary to previous studies, each list (with faces as stimuli) was associated with a different type of judgement (honesty versus intelligence rating). The results showed no age differences on this task when no particular retrieval strategy was induced. However, when participants were encouraged to retrieve the list of occurrence of the items by retrieving the type of judgement made at encoding, there was an age effect. Older adults’ performance was at chance, whereas younger adults had a good performance. Moreover, younger adults who reported using the strategy performed as well as younger adults who did not use it. These results will be discussed by reference to the distinction between automatic versus effortful encoding processes. [less ▲]

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See detailMemory for visual items of central or marginal interest in complex scene: Impact of eye movements and subject’s expertise.
Blavier, Adelaïde ULg; Nyssen, Anne-Sophie ULg

Conference (2009, June 03)

In complex scene, memory for central interest items is better than memory for marginal interest items and this difference remains stable independently of the scene presentation duration (Melcher, 2006 ... [more ▼]

In complex scene, memory for central interest items is better than memory for marginal interest items and this difference remains stable independently of the scene presentation duration (Melcher, 2006). However, without eye movement recording, it is not possible to know whether central interest items are better remembered because they are more fixated or because they are more meaningful. To answer this question, we analysed the memory of complex scenes (paintings) according to the eye movements and subjects’ expertise. 15 novice subjects and 15 art historians (experts) were asked to look at 6 paintings that were separately and randomly presented for 10 seconds. After each painting presentation, subjects were asked questions about pictorial details of 3 categories: details of central or marginal interest and background information. Although experts had prior knowledge about the paintings, the accuracy of answers about the pictorial details did not differ between both groups: all subjects showed best memory for central information while they failed to remember background information and marginal details. Despite a longest time spent in the background zone, memory for these details was poorer than for central interest items, suggesting the importance of the meaning over the fixation duration. Eye movement recordings also showed novice’s answers were more accurate when they looked longer at the asked detail and when this detail was watched early on in the presentation while in the expert group, the accuracy of the answer was not influenced by the duration and moment they watched the asked detail. [less ▲]

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See detailMemory impairments in dementia: Which memory and how does it fail?
Salmon, Eric ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg; Genon, Sarah ULg et al

in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience (2012)

Detailed reference viewed: 16 (4 ULg)
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See detailMemory impairments in depression: Controlled and automatic processes
Jermann, Françoise; Ceschi, Grazia; Adam, Stéphane ULg et al

Poster (2000, September 21)

Detailed reference viewed: 11 (4 ULg)
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See detailMemory in contracts. The experience of the EBRD (1991-2003)
Artige, Lionel ULg; Nicolini, Rosella

Conference (2005, August)

Detailed reference viewed: 10 (0 ULg)
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See detailMemory in Contracts: The Experience of the EBRD (1991-2003)
Artige, Lionel ULg

Conference (2006, August)

Detailed reference viewed: 11 (2 ULg)
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See detailMemory kernels and effective Hamiltonians from time dependent methods. I. Predissociation with a curve crossing
Desouter, Michèle ULg; Liévin, Jacques

in Journal of Chemical Physics (1997), 107

Detailed reference viewed: 2 (0 ULg)
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See detailMemory kernels and effective Hamiltonians from time dependent methods. II. Vibrational predissociation
Brems, Vincent; Desouter, Michèle ULg

in Journal of Chemical Physics (2002), 116

Detailed reference viewed: 3 (0 ULg)