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See detailMieux connaître sa Voix
Morsomme, Dominique ULg

Conference given outside the academic context (1994)

Detailed reference viewed: 5 (1 ULg)
See detailMieux connaître sa Voix
Morsomme, Dominique ULg

Conference given outside the academic context (1994)

Detailed reference viewed: 1 (0 ULg)
See detailMieux connaître sa Voix
Morsomme, Dominique ULg

Conference given outside the academic context (1994)

Detailed reference viewed: 4 (1 ULg)
See detailMieux mesurer l'arthrose.
Henrotin, Yves ULg

Article for general public (2006)

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See detailMieux nous connaître pour mieux nous faire connaître
Billen, Roland ULg

Article for general public (2010)

Detailed reference viewed: 64 (37 ULg)
See detailMieux se former et mieux réussir à l'université : Est-ce vraiment une utopie ?
Beckers, Jacqueline ULg

in Stogaitis, G. (Ed.) Efficacité pédagogique universitaire : Séminaire international itinérant en Belgique (1995)

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See detailMieux traiter le diabète : combattre l’inertie et améliorer l’adhésion au traitement.
SCHEEN, André ULg; PHILIPS, Jean-Christophe ULg; PAQUOT, Nicolas ULg

in Association belge du diabète (2010), 53

Le diabète est une maladie chronique par excellence. Comme beaucoup d’autres maladies chroniques, le diabète, qu’il soit de type 1 ou plus encore de type 2, est d’origine complexe, combinant l’infl uence ... [more ▼]

Le diabète est une maladie chronique par excellence. Comme beaucoup d’autres maladies chroniques, le diabète, qu’il soit de type 1 ou plus encore de type 2, est d’origine complexe, combinant l’infl uence de facteurs génétiques et environnementaux. Le but du traitement est de corriger au mieux l’hyperglycémie chronique, mais aussi d’autres facteurs de risque (hypertension artérielle, hypercholestérolémie,…), de façon à prévenir la survenue de complications, garantir une bonne qualité de vie et améliorer l’espérance de vie. [less ▲]

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See detailMieux Traiter le diabète permet-il de vivre plus longtemps?
Scheen, André ULg; Philips, Jean-Christophe ULg

in Médecine Clinique Endocrinologie & Diabète (2009), hors série(avril 2009), 2-7

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See detailMieux vaut prévenir que guérir
Rentier, Bernard ULg

Speech (2011)

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See detailMieux vaut prévenir que guérir !
Van Caillie, Didier ULg

Article for general public (2002)

This chronicle insists on the importance of prevention as a tool to reduce social and economic effects of business failures and highlights the role of a structured and coherent prevention policy, both at ... [more ▼]

This chronicle insists on the importance of prevention as a tool to reduce social and economic effects of business failures and highlights the role of a structured and coherent prevention policy, both at the firm level and at the institutional level. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 31 (2 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailMigraine
Sandor, Peter S.; Agosti, Reto; Schoenen, Jean ULg

in Pain Clinical Updates (2001), 9

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See detailMigraine - advances in genetic research and possible link to neurophysiological abnormalities
Sandor, Peter S.; Agosti, Reto; Schoenen, Jean ULg

in Schweizer Archiv für Neurologie, Neurochirurgie und Psychiatrie = Archives Suisses de Neurologie, Neurochirurgie et de Psychiatrie (2001), 152

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See detailMigraine - clinical neurophysiology.
Ambrosini, Anna; Magis, Delphine ULg; Schoenen, Jean ULg

in Nappi, G.; Moskowitz, M. (Eds.) Headache (2010)

Central nervous system (CNS) dysfunction is thought to be pivotal in migraine, and could occur at several levels: the brain (the cortex and its connections with subcortical nuclei), the brainstem, and ... [more ▼]

Central nervous system (CNS) dysfunction is thought to be pivotal in migraine, and could occur at several levels: the brain (the cortex and its connections with subcortical nuclei), the brainstem, and even peripheral structures (e.g., trigeminal ganglion and nerve). As it is particularly suited to functional evaluation of various components of the nervous system, neurophysiological testing has become a valuable tool for investigating migraine pathophysiology and the effects of pharmacological treatment. However it has limited value for migraine diagnosis because of a high interindividual variability. In this chapter, we critically review and summarize the available published literature on neurophysiological approaches in migraine, i.e., electroencephalography, evoked and event-related potentials, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), electromyography, and cerebellar testing. The most relevant techniques for understanding migraine pathophysiological mechanisms are highlighted. [less ▲]

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See detailMigraine and cluster headache--their management with sumatriptan: a critical review of the current clinical experience.
Wilkinson, M.; Pfaffenrath, V.; Schoenen, Jean ULg et al

in Cephalalgia : An International Journal of Headache (1995), 15(5), 337-57

Sumatriptan is a potent and selective agonist at the vascular 5HT1 receptor which mediates constriction of certain large cranial blood vessels and/or inhibits the release of vasoactive neuropeptides from ... [more ▼]

Sumatriptan is a potent and selective agonist at the vascular 5HT1 receptor which mediates constriction of certain large cranial blood vessels and/or inhibits the release of vasoactive neuropeptides from perivascular trigeminal axons in the dura mater following activation of the trigeminovascular system. The mode of action of this drug in migraine and cluster headache is discussed. On the basis of a detailed review of all published trials and available data from post-marketing studies, the efficacy, safety, tolerability and the place of oral and subcutaneous sumatriptan in the treatment of both conditions are assessed. A number of double-blind clinical trials have demonstrated that sumatriptan 100 mg administered orally is clearly superior to placebo in the acute treatment of migraine headache and achieves significantly greater response rates than ergotamine or aspirin. In other studies, 70 to 80% of patients receiving sumatriptan 6 mg sc experienced relief of migraine headaches by 1 or 2 h after administration, and patients consistently required less rescue medication for unresolved symptoms. Sumatriptan was also effective in relieving associated migraine symptoms like nausea and vomiting. Sumatriptan was equally effective regardless of migraine type or duration of migraine symptoms. Overall, approximately 40% of patients who initially responded to oral or subcutaneous sumatriptan experienced recurrence of their headache usually within 24 h, effectively treated by a further dose of this drug. In 75% of patients with cluster headache treated with sumatriptan 6 mg sc, relief was achieved within 15 min. Based on pooled study data, sumatriptan is generally well tolerated and most adverse events are transient. Adverse events following oral administration include nausea, vomiting, malaise, fatigue and dizziness. With the subcutaneous injection, injection site reactions occur in approximately 30%. Chest syumptoms are reported in 3 to 5% but have been associated with myocardial ischaemia only in rare isolated cases. The recommended dosage of sumatriptan at the onset of migraine symptoms is 100 mg orally or 6 mg subcutaneously. The recommended dosage for cluster headache is 6 mg sumatriptan sc. Sumatriptan must not be given together with vasoconstrictive substances, e.g., ergotamines, or with migraine prophylactics with similar properties, e.g., methysergide. Sumatriptan should not be given during the migraine aura. It is contraindicated in patients with ischaemic heart disease, previous myocardial infarction, Prinzmetal (variant) angina and uncontrolled hypertension. [less ▲]

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See detailLa migraine est-elle un trouble évolutif chronique?
Schoenen, Jean ULg

in Migraine Contact (2005), 4

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See detailMigraine management: current trends and future prospects
Fumal, Arnaud ULg

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2008)

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See detailMigraine prevention with a supraorbital transcutaneous stimulator. A randomized controlled trial.
Schoenen, Jean ULg; Vandersmissen, Bart; Jeangette, Sandrine et al

in Neurology (2013), 80

Detailed reference viewed: 87 (3 ULg)
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See detailMigraine preventive drugs differentially affect cortical spreading depression in rat.
Bogdanov, Vladimir ULg; Multon, Sylvie ULg; Chauvel, Virginie ULg et al

in Neurobiology of Disease (2011), 41(2), 430-5

Cortical spreading depression (CSD) is the most likely cause of the migraine aura. Drugs with distinct pharmacological properties are effective in the preventive treatment of migraine. To test the ... [more ▼]

Cortical spreading depression (CSD) is the most likely cause of the migraine aura. Drugs with distinct pharmacological properties are effective in the preventive treatment of migraine. To test the hypothesis that their common denominator might be suppression of CSD we studied in rats the effect of three drugs used in migraine prevention: lamotrigine which is selectively effective on the aura but not on the headache, valproate and riboflavin which have a non-selective effect. Rats received for 4 weeks daily intraperitoneal injections of one of the three drugs. For valproate and riboflavin we used saline as control, for lamotrigine its vehicle dimethyl sulfoxide. After treatment, cortical spreading depressions were elicited for 2h by occipital KCl application. We measured CSD frequency, its propagation between a posterior (parieto-occipital) and an anterior (frontal) electrode, and number of Fos-immunoreactive nuclei in frontal cortex. Lamotrigine suppressed CSDs by 37% and 60% at posterior and anterior electrodes. Valproate had no effect on posterior CSDs, but reduced anterior ones by 32% and slowed propagation velocity. Riboflavin had no significant effect at neither recording site. Frontal Fos expression was decreased after lamotrigine and valproate, but not after riboflavin. Serum levels of administered drugs were within the range of those usually effective in patients. Our study shows that preventive anti-migraine drugs have differential effects on CSD. Lamotrigine has a marked suppressive effect which correlates with its rather selective action on the migraine aura. Valproate and riboflavin have no effect on the triggering of CSD, although they are effective in migraine without aura. Taken together, these results are compatible with a causal role of CSD in migraine with aura, but not in migraine without aura. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 90 (13 ULg)