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See detailHemodiafiltration does not improve haemodynamics in a porcine model of endotoxin shock.
LAMBERMONT, Bernard ULiege; Moonen, Martial; KOLH, Philippe ULiege et al

in Intensive Care Medicine (2001), 27(2),

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See detailHemodiafiltration does not improve pulmonary hemodynamics in a porcine model of endotoxin shock
LAMBERMONT, Bernard ULiege; Moonen, Marie ULiege; Kolh, Philippe ULiege et al

in Intensive Care Medicine (2001), 27(2), 181

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See detailHémodialyse et hyperferritinémie
Paris, M.; Benoit, M. O.; Bied, A. et al

in Annales de Biologie Clinique (1992), 50(4), 251-258

Detailed reference viewed: 72 (2 ULiège)
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See detailHemodynamic and respiratory responses to low dose endotoxin infusion in the intact dog
D'Orio, Vincenzo ULiege; HAY, F; FOSSION, A et al

in Comptes Rendus des Séances de la Société de Biologie et de ses Filiales (1985), 179

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See detailHemodynamic cerebral correlates of sleep spindles during human non-rapid eye movement sleep.
Schabus, Manuel ULiege; Dang Vu, Thien Thanh ULiege; Albouy, Geneviève ULiege et al

in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2007), 104(32), 13164-9

In humans, some evidence suggests that there are two different types of spindles during sleep, which differ by their scalp topography and possibly some aspects of their regulation. To test for the ... [more ▼]

In humans, some evidence suggests that there are two different types of spindles during sleep, which differ by their scalp topography and possibly some aspects of their regulation. To test for the existence of two different spindle types, we characterized the activity associated with slow (11-13 Hz) and fast (13-15 Hz) spindles, identified as discrete events during non-rapid eye movement sleep, in non-sleep-deprived human volunteers, using simultaneous electroencephalography and functional MRI. An activation pattern common to both spindle types involved the thalami, paralimbic areas (anterior cingulate and insular cortices), and superior temporal gyri. No thalamic difference was detected in the direct comparison between slow and fast spindles although some thalamic areas were preferentially activated in relation to either spindle type. Beyond the common activation pattern, the increases in cortical activity differed significantly between the two spindle types. Slow spindles were associated with increased activity in the superior frontal gyrus. In contrast, fast spindles recruited a set of cortical regions involved in sensorimotor processing, as well as the mesial frontal cortex and hippocampus. The recruitment of partially segregated cortical networks for slow and fast spindles further supports the existence of two spindle types during human non-rapid eye movement sleep, with potentially different functional significance. [less ▲]

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See detailHemodynamic changes and catecholamine release during laparoscopic adrenalectomy for pheochromocytoma.
Joris, Jean ULiege; Hamoir, Etienne ULiege; Hartstein, Gary ULiege et al

in Anesthesia and Analgesia (1999), 88(1), 16-21

We investigated hemodynamics and plasma catecholamine concentrations in eight consecutive patients undergoing laparoscopic adrenalectomy for suspected pheochromocytoma. The same anesthesia protocol was ... [more ▼]

We investigated hemodynamics and plasma catecholamine concentrations in eight consecutive patients undergoing laparoscopic adrenalectomy for suspected pheochromocytoma. The same anesthesia protocol was used in all patients: a continuous infusion of sufentanil 0.5 microg x kg(-1) x h(-1) and isoflurane 0.4% (end-tidal) in 50% N2O/O2. Systolic arterial pressure was maintained between 120 and 160 mm Hg by adjusting an infusion of nicardipine, a calcium-channel blocker, while tachycardia (>100 bpm) was treated by 1-mg boluses of atenolol. Hemodynamics (thermodilution technique) and plasma catecholamine concentrations were measured before surgery, after the induction of anesthesia, after turning the patient to the lateral position, during pneumoperitoneum, during tumor manipulation, after adrenalectomy, and at the end of surgery. Two events resulted in significant catecholamine release: creation of the pneumoperitoneum and adrenal gland manipulation. As a consequence, a twofold increase in cardiac output was recorded. Adjustments of nicardipine infusion (2-6 microg x kg(-1) x min(-1)) minimized changes in mean arterial pressure. Beta-adrenergic blockade was necessary in six patients. In conclusion, laparoscopic adrenalectomy for pheochromocytoma results in marked catecholamine release during pneumoperitoneum and tumor manipulation. Titration of a nicardipine infusion allowed easy and quick control of the hemodynamic aberrancies related to these processes. IMPLICATIONS: Pneumoperitoneum during laparoscopy, now used for adrenalectomy, may complicate anesthetic management of patients with pheochromocytoma. In this study, laparoscopic adrenalectomy was associated with catecholamine release during the creation of pneumoperitoneum and tumor manipulation. Adjustments of a nicardipine infusion readily attenuated the subsequent hemodynamic aberrancies. [less ▲]

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See detailHemodynamic changes during laparoscopic cholecystectomy.
Joris, Jean ULiege; Noirot, Didier P; Legrand, Marc ULiege et al

in Anesthesia and Analgesia (1993), 76(5), 1067-71

Hemodynamics during laparoscopic cholecystectomy under general anesthesia (isoflurane in N2O/O2 (50%)) were investigated in 15 nonobese ASA Class I patients by using invasive hemodynamic monitoring ... [more ▼]

Hemodynamics during laparoscopic cholecystectomy under general anesthesia (isoflurane in N2O/O2 (50%)) were investigated in 15 nonobese ASA Class I patients by using invasive hemodynamic monitoring including a flow-directed pulmonary artery catheter. During surgery, intraabdominal pressure was maintained automatically at 14 mm Hg by a CO2 insufflator, and minute ventilation was controlled and adjusted to avoid hypercapnia. Hemodynamics were measured before anesthesia, after the induction of anesthesia, after tilting into 10 degrees head-up position, 5 min, 15 min, and 30 min after peritoneal insufflation, and 30 min after exsufflation. Induction of anesthesia decreased significantly mean arterial pressure and cardiac index (CI). Tilting the patient to the head-up position reduced cardiac preload and caused further reduction of CI. Peritoneal insufflation resulted in a significant increase (+/- 35%) of mean arterial pressure, a significant reduction (+/- 20%) of CI, and a significant increase of systemic (+/- 65%) and pulmonary (+/- 90%) vascular resistances. The combined effect of anesthesia, head-up tilt, and peritoneal insufflation produced a 50% decrease in CI. Administration of increasing concentrations of isoflurane, via its vasodilatory activity, may have partially blunted these hemodynamic changes. These results demonstrate that laparoscopy for cholecystectomy in head-up position results in significant hemodynamic changes in healthy patients, particularly at the induction of pneumoperitoneum. [less ▲]

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See detailHemodynamic changes induced by laparoscopy and their endocrine correlates: effects of clonidine.
Joris, Jean ULiege; Chiche, Jean-Daniel; Canivet, Jean-Luc ULiege et al

in Journal of the American College of Cardiology (1998), 32(5), 1389-96

OBJECTIVES: We investigated endocrine correlates of the hemodynamic changes induced by carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum (PNO). We then studied whether clonidine might modulate the hemodynamic changes ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES: We investigated endocrine correlates of the hemodynamic changes induced by carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum (PNO). We then studied whether clonidine might modulate the hemodynamic changes induced by PNO by reducing release of catecholamines and vasopressin. BACKGROUND: Both mechanical and neurohumoral factors contribute to the hemodynamic changes induced by carbon dioxide PNO. Several mediators have been proposed, but no study has correlated hemodynamic changes with changes in levels of these potential mediators. METHODS: We conducted two studies, each including 20 healthy patients scheduled for elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy. In the first study serial measurements of hemodynamics (thermodilution technique) were done during laparoscopy and after exsufflation. Plasma concentrations of cortisol, catecholamines, vasopressin, renin, endothelin and prostaglandins were measured at the same time points. In the second study patients were randomly allocated to receive 8 microg/kg clonidine infused over 1 h or placebo before PNO. Hemodynamics and plasma levels of cortisol, catecholamines and vasopressin were measured during PNO and after exsufflation. RESULTS: Peritoneal insufflation resulted in a significant reduction of cardiac output (18+/-4%) and increases in mean arterial pressure (39+/-8%) and systemic (70+/-12%) and pulmonary (98+/-18%) vascular resistances. Laparoscopy resulted in progressive and significant increases in plasma concentrations of cortisol, epinephrine, norepinephrine and renin. Vasopressin plasma concentrations markedly increased immediately after the beginning of PNO (before PNO 6+/-4 pg/ml; during PNO 129+/-42 pg/ml; p < 0.05). The profile of vasopressin release paralleled the time course of changes in systemic vascular resistance. Prostaglandins and endothelin did not change significantly. Clonidine significantly reduced mean arterial pressure, heart rate and the increase in systemic vascular resistance. Clonidine also significantly reduced catecholamine concentrations but did not alter vasopressin and cortisol plasma concentrations. CONCLUSIONS: Vasopressin and catecholamines probably mediate the increase in systemic vascular resistance observed during PNO. Clonidine before PNO reduces catecholamine release and attenuates hemodynamic changes during laparoscopy. [less ▲]

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See detailHemodynamic comparison of restrictive mitral valve annuloplasty and mitral valve replacement for ischemic mitral regurgitation
Fino, C; Iacovoni, a; Ferrero, P et al

in Circulation (2013)

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See detailHemodynamic effects and pharmacokinetic parameters of ARL-115 BS in patients with severe heart failure
EL ALLAF, D; CREMERS, S; D'Orio, Vincenzo ULiege et al

in Intensive Care Medicine (1983), 9

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See detailHemodynamic effects of a new antiarrhythmic agent, flecainide (R-818), in coronary heart disease.
Legrand, Victor ULiege; Vandormael, M.; Collignon, P. et al

in The American journal of cardiology (1983), 51(3), 422-6

The hemodynamic effects of flecainide acetate, a new class I antiarrhythmic agent, were studied in 10 patients with coronary heart disease. The drug was injected intravenously at a dose of 2 mg/kg over 30 ... [more ▼]

The hemodynamic effects of flecainide acetate, a new class I antiarrhythmic agent, were studied in 10 patients with coronary heart disease. The drug was injected intravenously at a dose of 2 mg/kg over 30 minutes. The mean drug plasma level achieved was 394 ng/ml (range 329 to 470). The heart rate did not change, but a significant increase (p less than 0.001) in P-R (+17%), QRS (+15%), and Q-T (+7%) duration occurred after drug administration. Negative inotropic effects also were observed and consisted of an increase (p less than 0.01) in pulmonary wedge pressure (+27%) and a decrease (p less than 0.01) in stroke index (-10%), left ventricular stroke work index (-12%), and left ventricular ejection rate (-11%). No significant change in mean aortic pressure or systemic and pulmonary vascular resistance occurred. Left ventriculography performed after drug infusion revealed a significant increase (p less than 0.01) in systolic volume (+9%) and a decrease in ejection fraction (-9%) and mean velocity of circumferential fiber shortening (Vcf) (-13%). A progressive and significant decrease of dP/dt was observed during drug infusion, but 15 minutes after the injection, dP/dt had returned to near basal values. Thus, flecainide acetate has slight, but significant negative inotropic effects, particularly conspicuous during drug infusion. The drug should be administered with caution in patients with poorly compensated heart. [less ▲]

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See detailHemodynamic effects of epinephrine associated to an epidural clonidine-bupivacaine mixture during combined lumbar epidural and general anesthesia.
Senard, Marc ULiege; Ledoux, Didier ULiege; Darmont, Pascaline ULiege et al

in Acta Anaesthesiologica Belgica (1998), 49(3), 167-73

Clonidine or epinephrine are frequently combined to epidural local anesthetics to strengthen sensory block and prolong analgesia. Both drugs impair the hemodynamic profile of central neural blockade but ... [more ▼]

Clonidine or epinephrine are frequently combined to epidural local anesthetics to strengthen sensory block and prolong analgesia. Both drugs impair the hemodynamic profile of central neural blockade but the effects of their combination on arterial pressure and heart rate are not known and were examined in this double-blind prospective randomised study. Forty four patients scheduled for lumbar disc surgery were allocated to two groups. Epidural anesthesia was obtained by administration of 150 micrograms clonidine in 15 ml bupivacaine 0.25% solution without (group C) or with (group C + E) 37.5 micrograms epinephrine. Systolic, mean, diastolic arterial pressure and heart rate were measured throughout the study. Combined epidural and general anesthesia induced a significant decrease in arterial pressure and heart rate in both groups. SAP and MAP decreased significantly less in the patients receiving epinephrine. Low dose epidural epinephrine decreases arterial pressure instability during combined epidural and general anesthesia. [less ▲]

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See detailHemodynamic effects of increasing PEEP during mechanical ventilation in anesthetized patients
LAMBERMONT, Bernard ULiege; Ghuysen, Alexandre ULiege; D'Orio, Vincenzo ULiege et al

in American Journal of Respiratory & Critical Care Medicine (1997), 2

Detailed reference viewed: 10 (1 ULiège)
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See detailHemodynamic effects of intermittent or continuous positive-pressure breathing in man.
Lamy, Maurice ULiege; Deghislage, J.; Lamalle, D. et al

in Acta Anaesthesiologica Belgica (1973), 24(3), 270-87

Detailed reference viewed: 22 (1 ULiège)
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See detailHemodynamic effects of intratracheal administration of Pasteurella haemolytica in calves
Amory, Hélène ULiege; Linden, Annick ULiege; Desmecht, Daniel ULiege et al

in Pflügers Archiv : European Journal of Physiology (1995), 430

Detailed reference viewed: 22 (11 ULiège)
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See detailHemodynamic effects of intratracheal administration of Pasteurella haemolytica in calves
Amory, Hélène ULiege; Linden, Annick ULiege; Desmecht, Daniel ULiege et al

in Pflügers Archiv : European Journal of Physiology (1995), 430

Detailed reference viewed: 28 (11 ULiège)
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See detailHemodynamic effects of intravenous diltiazem with impaired left ventricular function.
Materne, P.; Legrand, Victor ULiege; Vandormael, M. et al

in The American journal of cardiology (1984), 54(7), 733-7

The acute hemodynamic effects of intravenous diltiazem were studied in 8 patients with coronary artery disease, left ventricular (LV) failure (New York Heart Association functional class III), a rest ... [more ▼]

The acute hemodynamic effects of intravenous diltiazem were studied in 8 patients with coronary artery disease, left ventricular (LV) failure (New York Heart Association functional class III), a rest ejection fraction (EF) less than 40% or a cardiac index less than 2.4 liters/min/m2. Hemodynamic measurements and LV angiograms were performed at rest before and after the administration of diltiazem, 0.5 mg/kg, administered at a speed of 5 mg/min. Diltiazem treatment induced a decrease in heart rate from 68 +/- 12 to 55 +/- 9 beats/min (p less than 0.001). Mean aortic pressure decreased from 94 +/- 14 to 81 +/- 15 mmHg (p less than 0.05). Thus, the pressure-rate product significantly decreased under the influence of the drug, from 8,791 +/- 2,465 to 6,342 +/- 1,808 beats mm Hg/min, (p less than 0.001). Diltiazem induced no significant change of LV end-diastolic pressure, pulmonary wedge pressure, cardiac index and LV stroke work index. Systemic vascular resistance decreased (p less than 0.01), whereas pulmonary vascular resistance showed no change. End-systolic volume diminished (p less than 0.02), which accounts for the increase of stroke volume and ejection fraction (p less than 0.001). Disorders of regional contractility were not aggravated by diltiazem, and even improved in individual cases. Thus, intravenous diltiazem may be used safely in patients with heart failure. However, in view of the marked bradycardic effects seen in some cases, heart rate should be carefully monitored. [less ▲]

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See detailHemodynamic Effects of Medetomidine-Midazolam-Butorphanol and Medetomidine-Midazolam-Buprenorphine Combinations and Reversibility by Atipamezole in Dogs
Pypendop, B.; Serteyn, Didier ULiege; Verstegen, J.

in American Journal of Veterinary Research (1996), 57(5), 724-30

OBJECTIVE--To characterize the hemodynamic effects of medetomidine (1 mg/m2 of body surface area; dosage, 39 to 46 micrograms/kg of body weight, IM) and midazolam (1 mg/kg of body weight, i.v.) combined ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE--To characterize the hemodynamic effects of medetomidine (1 mg/m2 of body surface area; dosage, 39 to 46 micrograms/kg of body weight, IM) and midazolam (1 mg/kg of body weight, i.v.) combined with butorphanol (0.1 mg/kg, i.v.), buprenorphine (10 micrograms/kg, i.v.) or saline solution. Reversibility of these effects by atipamezole (2.5 mg/m2; dosage, 97.5 to 115 micrograms/kg, IM) was evaluated. DESIGN--2 treated groups and 1 control group, without repetition. ANIMALS--15 clinically normal dogs (3 groups of 5). PROCEDURE--Medetomidine was administered at time 0; midazolam and butorphanol, buprenorphine, or saline solution at time 20; and atipamezole at time 60. Heart rate, systemic and pulmonary arterial pressures, central venous pressure, body temperature, cardiac output, and arterial and mixed venous blood gas tensions and pH were measured. Cardiac index, stroke index, systemic and pulmonary vascular resistances, and left and right stroke work indexes were calculated. RESULTS--Body temperature, heart rate, cardiac index, and stroke index were significantly decrease below baseline values in some groups. Central venous pressure, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, and systemic vascular resistance were significantly increased above baseline in all groups. Arterial and venous PO2 and pH decreased in all groups and PCO2 increased, but these changes were more pronounced when buprenorphine was administered. Arterial pressure decreased after atipamezole administration. CONCLUSION--The combinations seemed to result in cardiorespiratory depressant effects of similar importance and most of these effects, which are related to medetomidine, were reversed by atipamezole. [less ▲]

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See detailHemodynamic effects of nifedipine on secondary pulmonary hypertension in man
garzaniti, n; EL ALLAF, Dia ULiege; D'Orio, Vincenzo ULiege et al

in Acta Cardiologica (1985), 40

Detailed reference viewed: 11 (2 ULiège)