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See detailMeasuring Individual Brand Image Perceptions and Brand Reputation using Associative Networks: Theory and Implications for Consumer Goods
Brandt, Céline ULg

Doctoral thesis (2010)

This study specifically addresses the question of how associative networks contribute to brand image perception measurement to segment the market more effectively, as well as to demonstrate brand image ... [more ▼]

This study specifically addresses the question of how associative networks contribute to brand image perception measurement to segment the market more effectively, as well as to demonstrate brand image impairment. Carried out using surveys and experimental designs, this dissertation is positioned as part of the research stream on the use of associative networks in marketing, and particularly consumer mapping. Firstly, this study provides clear arguments for using brand concept maps (BCM) as highly suitable method to capture the complete brand image and segment the market based on brand perception. Secondly, thanks to BCM, the present research provide empirical evidences on the likelihood of brand image confusion, namely the dilution of attributes and the creation of unattractive associations, as a result of the introduction of a new brand. Thirdly, BCM captures the effect of exposure to negative user-generated content on the likelihood of doppelganger brand image, namely the appearance, or reinforcement, of negative associations at the brand reputation level. This work reveals that BCM is a superior approach to measure brand image and brand reputation, compared to dyadic methods. In addition, it broadens the applications of associative networks in marketing. Moreover this research shows how consumers and competitors may influence the brand image. Besides this scientific output, this research aims in providing brand mangers with an effective method to monitor and capture brand image and brand reputation. [less ▲]

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See detailMeasuring Lexical Proximity
Noiroux, Kevin ULg

Master's dissertation (2009)

Detailed reference viewed: 14 (0 ULg)
See detailMeasuring local hydrological effects on the long term-gravity variation in Membach, Belgium
Van Camp, Michel; Warnant, René ULg; Vanneste, K. et al

Conference (2002)

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See detailMeasuring Magnetic Fields in the Outer Atmosphere – Solar magnetism eXplorer (SolmeX)
Hardi, Peter,; Rochus, Pierre ULg

(2011, September 16)

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See detailMeasuring operational risk in financial institutions
Plunus, Séverine ULg; Hübner, Georges ULg; Peters, Jean-Philippe ULg

in Applied Financial Economics (2012), 22(18), 1553-1569

The scarcity of internal loss databases tends to hinder the use of the advanced approaches for operational risk measurement (Advanced Measurement Approaches (AMA)) in financial institutions. As there is a ... [more ▼]

The scarcity of internal loss databases tends to hinder the use of the advanced approaches for operational risk measurement (Advanced Measurement Approaches (AMA)) in financial institutions. As there is a greater variety in credit risk modelling, this article explores the applicability of a modified version of CreditRisk+ to operational loss data. Our adapted model, OpRisk+, works out very satisfying Values-at-Risk (VaR) at 95% level as compared with estimates drawn from sophisticated AMA models. OpRisk+ proves to be especially worthy in the case of small samples, where more complex methods cannot be applied. OpRisk+ could therefore be used to fit the body of the distribution of operational losses up to the 95%-percentile, while Extreme Value Theory (EVT), external databases or scenario analysis should be used beyond this quantile. [less ▲]

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See detailMeasuring positive and negative aspects of well-being at work: Intern and extern validity of the PNOSI.
Barbier, Marie ULg; Hansez, Isabelle ULg

Conference (2009, May)

With the emergence of positive psychology, research interest in workers positive responses to work conditions has gained ground fast. In the beginning of the 21st century, our unit developed the PNOSI, a ... [more ▼]

With the emergence of positive psychology, research interest in workers positive responses to work conditions has gained ground fast. In the beginning of the 21st century, our unit developed the PNOSI, a new tool for measuring Positive and Negative Occupational Stress. Negative occupational stress was defined as the response of workers facing demands they feel they have to manage but for which they doubt necessary resources are available. Positive occupational stress was defined as the response of workers facing demands they feel they have to manage and for which they perceive necessary resources are available. Exploratory analyses (Barbier & Hansez, 2008) have identified a two-factor structure, one measuring Positive Occupational Stress (POSI) and the other measuring Negative Occupational Stress (NOSI). The following research has two goals: establishing PNOSI intern structure through a cross-validation strategy using calibration and validation samples (goal 1), and testing its convergent and discriminant validity (goal 2). As regards to goal 1, structural equation modelling using Lisrel 8.80 was performed on 2,713 data collected in a Belgian electricity company. Results show that the two-factor solution suits data best than an alternative one “wellbeing” factor solution. Moreover, eliminating two items leads to better fit. We then fitted this reduced two-factor structure on more than 15,000 data collected in six companies. Results show that the reduced two-factor solution should be preferred to the alternative one in all six samples. PNOSI intern structure is thus replicated. As regards to goal 2, we calculated correlations between NOSI and POSI scales, and constructs of burnout, engagement, workaholism and commitment. Data were collected in a Belgian public institution (N = 954). NOSI was moderately correlated to our burnout measure, and can thus be considered as a different, even if related, construct. POSI was highly correlated to our measure of engagement, challenging our hypothesis that the two are different constructs. Finally, NOSI was moderately and negatively correlated to commitment and positively correlated to workaholism, whereas the reverse was true for POSI. It seems thus that NOSI is distinct from burnout, workaholism and commitment, whereas POSI is distinct from workaholism and commitment. To conclude, we can say that PNOSI two-factor structure is established. NOSI shows convergent validity with the similar construct of burnout, but is distinct from it. Results are less clear concerning POSI and engagement. Finally, NOSI and POSI are differently related to constructs of commitment and workaholism; their discriminant validity is thus established. [less ▲]

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See detailMeasuring positive and negative occupational states (PNOSI) : Structural confirmation of a new Belgian tool
Barbier, Marie ULg; Peters, Stéphanie ULg; Hansez, Isabelle ULg

in Psychologica Belgica (2009), 49(4), 227-247

This article reports on the validation of the Positive and Negative Occupational States Inventory (PNOSI), a new tool for measuring positive and negative occupational states. Three goals were defined ... [more ▼]

This article reports on the validation of the Positive and Negative Occupational States Inventory (PNOSI), a new tool for measuring positive and negative occupational states. Three goals were defined: testing the structural validity of the PNOSI, testing its stability, and testing its convergent and discriminant validity with engagement, burnout, commitment, and workaholism. Data were collected in seven different companies (more than 16,000 participants). The factorial validity of the PNOSI was demonstrated using covariance structure analyses. A two-factor model with a negative occupational state factor and a positive occupational state factor fitted the data better than an alternative one-factor model. The two corresponding scales demonstrated good internal consistency. The results confirmed that positive and negative occupational states are distinct constructs and should be measured with different items. Convergent and discriminant validity with related constructs, such as engagement, burnout, commitment, and workaholism, were also demonstrated. The conclusion is that the PNOSI has good psychometric properties. [less ▲]

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See detailMeasuring poverty without the Mortality Paradox
Lefebvre, Mathieu ULg; Pestieau, Pierre ULg; Ponthiere, Grégory ULg

in Social Choice and Welfare (2013), 40(1), 285-316

Under income-differentiated mortality, poverty measures reflect not only the “true” poverty, but, also, the interferences or noise caused by the survival process at work. Such interferences lead to the ... [more ▼]

Under income-differentiated mortality, poverty measures reflect not only the “true” poverty, but, also, the interferences or noise caused by the survival process at work. Such interferences lead to the Mortality Paradox: the worse the survival conditions of the poor are, the lower the measured poverty is. We examine several solutions to avoid that paradox. We identify conditions under which the extension, by means of a fictitious income, of lifetime income profiles of the prematurely dead neutralizes the noise due to differential mortality. Then, to account not only for the “missing” poor, but, also, for the “hidden” poverty (premature death), we use, as a fictitious income, the welfare-neutral income, making indifferent between life continuation and death. The robustness of poverty measures to the extension technique is illustrated with regional Belgian data. [less ▲]

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See detailMeasuring poverty without the mortality paradox
Lefebvre, Mathieu ULg; Pestieau, Pierre ULg; Ponthiere, Grégory ULg

E-print/Working paper (2011)

Under income-differentiated mortality, poverty measures reflect not only the "true" poverty, but, also, the interferences or noise caused by the survival process at work. Such interferences lead to the ... [more ▼]

Under income-differentiated mortality, poverty measures reflect not only the "true" poverty, but, also, the interferences or noise caused by the survival process at work. Such interferences lead to the Mortality Paradox: the worse the survival conditions of the poor are, the lower the measured poverty is. We examine several solutions to avoid that paradox. We identify conditions under which the extension, by means of a fictitious income, of lifetime income profiles of the prematurely dead neutralizes the noise due to differential mortality. Then, to account not only for the "missing" poor, but, also, for the "hidden" poverty (premature death), we use, as a fictitious income, the welfare-neutral income, making indifferent between life continuation and death. The robustness of poverty measures to the extension technique is illustrated with regional Belgian data. [less ▲]

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See detailMeasuring productive performance in the non-life insurance industry: the case of French and Belgian markets
Fecher-Bourgeois, Fabienne ULg; Pestieau, Pierre ULg; Perelman, Sergio ULg et al

in Tijdschrift voor Economie en Management (1995), (40), 47-69

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See detailMeasuring Quantity-Quality Trade-Offs in Regulation: the Brazilian Freight Railways Case
Estache, Antonio; Perelman, Sergio ULg; Trujillo, Lourdes

in Annals of Public and Cooperative Economics = Annales de l'Economie Publique, Sociale et Coopérative (2007), 78(1), 1-20

The quantity vs. quality trade-offs in network industries are well known from the theoretical literature and have been the subject of many empirical assessments, although mostly for the telecoms and ... [more ▼]

The quantity vs. quality trade-offs in network industries are well known from the theoretical literature and have been the subject of many empirical assessments, although mostly for the telecoms and energy sectors. The purpose of this paper is to expand the evidence for the railway sector by documenting the importance of this trade-off in the context of the Brazilian freight railway industry reform, the first example of a railway sector in which tariff revisions are subject to joint output and quality performance indicators. The analysis is based on the calculation of the Malmquist productivity index proposed by Fare et al. (1995). The decomposable nature of this total factor productivity (TFP) index reveals the prevalence of quantity-quality trade-offs up to the end of the reform period, but a positive correlation between them during the period just afterwards. This type of information would certainly be useful for regulation purposes, particularly as an alternative way of taking into account quality without introducing complex, and very often ineffective, penalty schemes. [less ▲]

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See detailMeasuring Social Economy in the Framework of the National Accounts
Mertens de Wilmars, Sybille ULg

in Defourny, Jacques; Develtere, Patrick; Fonteneau, Bénédicte (Eds.) et al The Worldwide making of the social economy Innovations and changes (2009)

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See detailMEASURING SOIL ORGANIC CARBON IN CROPLANDS AT REGIONAL SCALE USING AIRBORNE IMAGING SPECTROSCOPY
Stevens, Antoine; Udelhoven, Thomas; Denis, Antoine ULg et al

in Geoderma (2010), 158

Conventional sampling techniques are often too expensive and time consuming to meet the amount of data required in soil monitoring or modelling studies. The emergence of portable and flexible ... [more ▼]

Conventional sampling techniques are often too expensive and time consuming to meet the amount of data required in soil monitoring or modelling studies. The emergence of portable and flexible spectrometers could provide the large amount of spatial data needed. In particular, the ability of airborne imaging spectroscopy to cover large surfaces in a single campaign and to study the spatial distribution of soil properties with a high spatial resolution represents an opportunity for improving the monitoring of soil characteristics and soil threats such as the decline of soil organic matter in the topsoil. However, airborne imaging spectroscopy has been generally applied over small areas with homogeneous soil types and surface conditions. Here, five hyperspectral images acquired with the AHS-160 sensor (430 nm–2540 nm) were analysed with the objective to map soil organic carbon (SOC) at a regional scale. The study area, covering a surface of ∼420 km2 and located in Luxembourg, is characterized by different soil types and a high variation in SOC contents. Reflectance data were related to surface SOC contents of bare croplands by means of 3 different multivariate calibration techniques: partial least square regression (PLSR), penalized-spline signal regression (PSR) and support vector machine regression (SVMR). The performance of these statistical tools was tested under different combinations of calibration/validation sets (global and local calibrations stratified according to agro-geological zones, soil type and image number). Under global calibration, the Root Mean Square Error in the Predictions reached 5.3–6.2 g C kg−1. Under local calibrations, this error was reduced by a factor up to 1.9. SOC maps of bare agricultural fields were produced using the best calibration model. Two map excerpts were shown, which display intra- and inter-field variability of SOC contents possibly related to topography and land management. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 191 (49 ULg)
See detailMeasuring some cognitive effects of using control technology, 'NATO Advanced Research Workshop', Liège, novembre 1992
Denis, Brigitte ULg

in Denis, Brigitte (Ed.) Control technology in elementary education (1992)

Detailed reference viewed: 9 (2 ULg)