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See detailInfluence of steam explosion on the thermal stability of cellulose fibres
Jacquet, Nicolas ULg; Quievy, Nicolas; Vanderghem, Caroline ULg et al

in Polymer Degradation & Stability (2011), 96

The aim of the present study was to compare the effect of different steam explosion treatments on the thermal degradation of a bleached cellulose. The intensity of a steam explosion treatment, which ... [more ▼]

The aim of the present study was to compare the effect of different steam explosion treatments on the thermal degradation of a bleached cellulose. The intensity of a steam explosion treatment, which allows breakdown of the structural lignocellulosic material was determined by a correlation between time and temperature of the process. Results of this study showed that thermal degradation of cellulose fibres was limited when the severity factor applied was below 4.0. For higher intensities, determination of the degradation products in the water-soluble extract showed an important increase of the 5-hydroxymethyl-furfural concentration with the temperature. When the severity factor reached 5.2., TGA analysis showed that the increase of degradation products was coupled to an increase of the char level meaning a strong degradation of the cellulose. dTGA behaviour also showed that thermal stability of the steam explosion samples decreased with the intensity of the treatment. To conclude, a theoretical diagram predicting the degradation of the cellulose during the steam explosion treatment was established. [less ▲]

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See detailINFLUENCE OF STEAM EXPLOSION ON THECRYSTALLINITY OF CELLULOSE FIBER
Jacquet, Nicolas ULg; Vanderghem, Caroline ULg; Danthine, Sabine ULg et al

Poster (2014, February 07)

The aim of the present study is to compare the effect of different steam explosion treatments on crystallinity properties of a pure bleached cellulose. Steam explosion process is composed of two distinct ... [more ▼]

The aim of the present study is to compare the effect of different steam explosion treatments on crystallinity properties of a pure bleached cellulose. Steam explosion process is composed of two distinct stages: vapocracking and explosive decompression. The treatment intensities is determined by a severity factor, established by a correlation between temperature process and retention time. The results show that steam explosion treatment has an impact on the crystallinity properties of pure cellulose fiber. When the severity factor is below 5.2, an increase of the overall crystallinity of the samples is observed with the treatment intensities. For higher intensities, a significant thermal degradation of cellulose lead to an important change in substrate composition, which lead to a further decrease of cellulose crystallinity. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence of steel anisotropy during deep-drawing process
Duchene, Laurent ULg; Habraken, Anne ULg; Godinas, A.

in Habraken, Anne (Ed.) Proceedings of the 4th international Conference ESAFORM (2001)

This paper presents a constitutive law based on Taylor's model implemented in our finite element code LAGAMINE. The yield locus is only locally described and a particular interpolation method has been ... [more ▼]

This paper presents a constitutive law based on Taylor's model implemented in our finite element code LAGAMINE. The yield locus is only locally described and a particular interpolation method has been developed. This local yield locus model uses a discrete representation of the texture. The interpolation method is presented and a deep-drawing application is simulated in order to show up the influence of the texture evolution during forming processes. [less ▲]

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See detailThe influence of stent length on clinical and angiographic outcome in patients undergoing elective stenting for native coronary artery lesions; final results of the Magic 5L Study.
Foley, D. P.; Pieper, M.; Wijns, W. et al

in European heart journal (2001), 22(17), 1585-93

AIMS: To prospectively evaluate the influence of stent length on 6 month clinical and angiographic outcome, in patients with native coronary lesions up to 45 mm in length, undergoing elective Magic ... [more ▼]

AIMS: To prospectively evaluate the influence of stent length on 6 month clinical and angiographic outcome, in patients with native coronary lesions up to 45 mm in length, undergoing elective Magic Wallstent implantation. METHODS AND RESULTS: On the basis of pre-procedural angiography, 276 patients (aged 61.3+/-10.2 years; 78.6% male; 41.7% unstable angina) with a total of 302 lesions were prospectively assigned to one of five different length categories of Magic Wallstent. Angiography in multiple matched projections before and after implantation and at 6 months follow-up was analysed at the core laboratory. Primary end-points for the efficacy analysis were cumulative incidence of major adverse cardiac events and quantitative coronary angiography analysis 6 months after stent implantation. Magic Wallstent implantation was successful in 301 of 302 lesions and in 98.6% a residual stenosis <20% by online quantitative coronary angiography was achieved. At 30 days, 6.2% (1.8% subacute occlusion) of patients had experienced major adverse cardiac events, 27.5% at 6 months and 30.4% at 9 months. Angiographic restenosis occurred in 37%. Restenosis rates for the mini, extra-short, short, medium and long Wallstent groups were 25.9%, 25%, 22.6%, 36.2% and 67.5%, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed stent length to be independently associated with greater angiographic restenosis and major adverse cardiac events. CONCLUSIONS: While shorter Magic Wallstents provided late outcomes comparable with short balloon-expandable stents, excessive restenosis with longer Wallstents should obviate their use in elective percutaneous intervention. Long coronary lesions provide a challenging substrate for emerging antirestenosis therapies, such as stent coatings and brachytherapy. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence of stiffness constraints on optimal design of trusses using morphological indicators
Vandenbergh, Thomas; Ponsaert, Wim; Van Steirteghem, Jan et al

(2006)

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See detailInfluence of stocking rate on animal performance and behaviour of grazing young bulls
Gielen, Marc ULg; Dufrasne, Isabelle ULg; Limbourg, Pierre et al

in Proceedings of the 42nd Annual Meeting of E.A.A.P. (1991)

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See detailInfluence of strength performance disorders on hamstring strain recurrence
Croisier, Jean-Louis ULg; Forthomme, Bénédicte ULg; Crielaard, Jean-Michel ULg

in Isokinetics & Exercise Science (2002, March), 10

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See detailInfluence of Stress History Function in the Schneider-Concrete-Model Under Fire Attack
Morita, Takeshi; Franssen, Jean-Marc ULg; Schneider, Ulrich

in Hasemi (Ed.) Proc. 5th Int. Symp. on Fire Safety Science (1997)

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See detailInfluence of structural frame bahaviour on joint design
Guisse, S.; Jaspart, Jean-Pierre ULg

in Proceedings of the Third International Workshop on Connections in Steel Structures (1995)

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See detailInfluence of subclinical inflammatory airway disease on equine respiratory function evalueated by impulse oscillometry
Richard, Eric ULg; Fortier, Guillaume; Denoix, Jean-Marie et al

in Equine Veterinary Journal (2009), 41(4), 384-389

Reasons for performing study: Inflammatory airway disease (IAD) is a nonseptic condition of the lower respiratory tract. Its negative impact on respiratory function has previously <br /><br />been ... [more ▼]

Reasons for performing study: Inflammatory airway disease (IAD) is a nonseptic condition of the lower respiratory tract. Its negative impact on respiratory function has previously <br /><br />been described using either forced expiration or forced oscillations techniques. However, sedation or drug-induced bronchoconstriction were usually required. The impulse <br /><br />oscillometry system (IOS) is a noninvasive and sensitive respiratory function test validated in horses, which could be useful to evaluate IAD-affected horses without further <br /><br />procedures. <br /><br />Objectives: To determine the sensitivity of IOS in detecting alterations of the respiratory function in subclinically IAD-affected horses without inducing bronchoprovocation and to characterise their respiratory impedance according to frequency for each respiratory phase. <br /><br />Methods: Pulmonary function was evaluated at rest by IOS in 34 Standardbred trotters. According to the cytology of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), 19 horses were defined <br /><br />as IAD-affected and 15 horses were used as control (CTL). Total respiratory resistance (Rrs) and reactance (Xrs) from 1–20 Hz as well as their inspiratory and expiratory <br /><br />components were compared between groups. <br /><br />Results: A significant increase of Rrs at the lower frequencies (R1–10 Hz) as well as a significant decrease of Xrs beyond 5 Hz (X5–20 Hz) was observed in IAD compared to CTL horses. IOS-data was also significantly different between inspiration and expiration in IAD-affected horses. In the whole population, both BALF eosinophil and mast cell counts were <br /><br />significantly correlated with IOS measurements. <br /><br />Conclusions: Functional respiratory impairment may be measured, even in the absence of clinical signs of disease. In IAD-affected horses, the different parameters of respiratory <br /><br />function (Rrs or Xrs) may vary depending on the inflammatory cell profiles represented in BALF. <br /><br />Potential relevance: Impulse oscillometry could be used in a routine clinical setting as a noninvasive method for early detection of subclinical respiratory disease and of the results <br /><br />of treatment in horses. [less ▲]

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See detailThe influence of subjective factors on the evaluation of singing voice accuracy
Larrouy, Pauline ULg; Morsomme, Dominique ULg

Poster (2013, August)

A previous study highlighted the objectivity of music experts when rating the vocal accuracy of sung performances (Larrouy-Maestri, Lévêque, Schön, Giovanni, & Morsomme, 2013). However, in an ecological ... [more ▼]

A previous study highlighted the objectivity of music experts when rating the vocal accuracy of sung performances (Larrouy-Maestri, Lévêque, Schön, Giovanni, & Morsomme, 2013). However, in an ecological context, numerous factors can influence the judges’ assessment of a music performance. This preliminary study aims to examine the effect of the music level of the performers on the evaluation of singing voice accuracy and to explore subjective factors which could influence the assessment. The same sung melody, performed by first and second year students of music conservatory (N = 31), was recorded in the context of their solfeggio examination. The jury, constituted of four music experts, was asked to rate the global pitch accuracy of each student. Two criteria (pitch interval deviation and tonal center deviation) were objectively measured and subjective data about the feeling of the students during the performance (e.g. anxiety level, enjoyment of singing) were collected through questionnaires. The results showed that the criteria used by the jury differed according to the music level of the students. Indeed, while the score of the jury correlated significantly with the vocal accuracy of the second year students, their assessment seemed more subjective concerning the first year students. Interestingly, the score of the jury was significantly correlated with the enjoyment of singing of the first year students and not with the objective measurements (pitch interval deviation and tonal center deviation) anymore. This preliminary work shows the effect of the music level of the performers on the evaluation of singing voice accuracy. Besides the educational implications of these findings, this study describes a promising method for the investigation of subjective factors, which influence the vocal assessment in an ecological context. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence of substrate hydrophobicity on the adsorption of an amphiphilic diblock copolymer
De Cupere, V. M.; Gohy, Jean-François; Jérôme, Robert ULg et al

in Journal of Colloid and Interface Science (2004), 271(1), 60-68

The adsorption of poly(tert-butylmethacrylate)-block-poly(2-(dimethylamino-ethyl) methacrylate) (PtBUMA-b-PDMAEMA) was studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM ... [more ▼]

The adsorption of poly(tert-butylmethacrylate)-block-poly(2-(dimethylamino-ethyl) methacrylate) (PtBUMA-b-PDMAEMA) was studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis performed on dried samples. The copolymer was dissolved in toluene at concentrations below (0.01 wt%) and above (0.05 and 1 wt%) the CMC; silicon (SiOH) and CH3-grafted silicon (SiCH3) were used as substrates. Whatever the concentration and the substrate, a layer of individual copolymer molecules, 1.5-3 nm thick, formed rapidly. The adsorbed amount was slightly higher and the resistance to AFM tip scraping was stronger on SiOH than oil SiCH3. This is attributed to hydrogen bonding between the PDMAEMA block and the OH groups of the silicon surface, leading to polarization of the adsorbed layer. Above the CMC, on SiOH, randomly scattered dot-like features (about 5 nm high) observed by AFM were attributed to individual micelles, which were not displaced by drying. On SiCH3, the particles found on the top of the adsorbed layer were micelle aggregates, about 50 nm thick, the lateral size of which was strongly influenced by the rate of drying. This further difference between SiCH3 and SiOH is tentatively attributed to the exposure of PDMAEMA by the adsorbed layer formed on SiCH3, while only PtBUMA would be exposed by the layer adsorbed on SiOH. The red blood cell shape and the size of the micelles observed in single layers indicate that the PtBUMA corona was not made compact as a result of drying, (C) 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence of substrate nature and β-lactoglobulin on cleanability after soiling by suspension spraying and drying
Toure, Yetioman ULg; Sindic, Marianne ULg; Dupont-Gillain, C. Christine et al

in Chemical Engineering Science (2015), 134

Glass and stainless steel (StSteel, AISI304-2R), previously cleaned with ethanol (-Eth) or with ethanol and UV–Ozone treatment (-UVO), were soiled with quartz suspensions in water and in a β-lactoglobulin ... [more ▼]

Glass and stainless steel (StSteel, AISI304-2R), previously cleaned with ethanol (-Eth) or with ethanol and UV–Ozone treatment (-UVO), were soiled with quartz suspensions in water and in a β-lactoglobulin (β-LGB) solution, and dried. The cleanability (ease of quartz particle detachment) in water was evaluated using a radial-flow cell. The soiling suspension containing β-LGB was used as such or after heating for 4h at 75°C, which provoked coagulation of about 75% of β-LGB. The substrate–solution interfaces were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis of conditioned substrates and by contact angle measurements. The substrate surfaces are covered by a layer of organic contaminants which are not removed by pre-cleaning or are adsorbed from the surroundings. The presence of β-LGB in the soiling suspension leads to protein adsorption, but a significant amount of contaminants remains at the surface. For three of the substrates tested (Glass-Eth, Glass-UVO, StSteel-UVO) the increase of cleanability when the soiling suspension contained β-LGB may be explained by lower capillary forces acting upon drying. Capillary forces are proportional to the liquid surface tension and depend in a less important way on substrate contact angle. However the order of cleanability observed for the substrates soiled with a suspension of quartz particles in water (Glass-Eth≅Glass-UVO<StSteel-UVO<StSteel-Eth) and the influence of β-LGB on the cleanability of StSteel-Eth may not be explained only by computed capillary forces. The contact angle may exert a direct influence on droplet spreading and particle–substrate contact. The organic contaminants present on the surfaces, which are often neglected by supposing model solid surfaces, may have a significant influence on cleanability through physico-chemical processes which remain to be appreciated. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence of sugar beet pulp on feeding behavior, growth performance, carcass quality and gut health of fattening pigs.
Laitat, Martine ULg; Antoine, Nadine ULg; Cabaraux, Jean-François ULg et al

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement = Biotechnology, Agronomy, Society and Environment [=BASE] (2015), 19(1), 20-31

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See detailThe influence of sugar-beet fibre, guar gum and inulin on nutrient digestibility, water consumption and plasma metabolites in healthy Beagle dogs.
Diez, Marianne ULg; Hornick, Jean-Luc ULg; Baldwin, Paule ULg et al

in Research in Veterinary Science (1998), 64(2), 91-6

The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of three fibres (sugar-beet fibre, guar gum and inulin) incorporated in the basal diet of healthy dogs at 7 per cent of dry matter (DM). Parameters ... [more ▼]

The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of three fibres (sugar-beet fibre, guar gum and inulin) incorporated in the basal diet of healthy dogs at 7 per cent of dry matter (DM). Parameters examined included stool output, water consumption, nutrient digestibility and fasting and postprandial plasma metabolites. All fibres increased wet faecal output; an increase in faecal DM output being observed with sugar-beet fibre only. Sugar-beet fibre and inulin increased daily water consumption. Sugar-beet fibre and guar gum decreased DM digestibility. The three fibres diminished organic matter and crude protein digestibility while ether extract digestibility was decreased by guar gum and inulin. Guar gum induced lower postprandial insulin, alpha-amino-nitrogen and urea plasma concentrations. Guar gum also lowered fasting cholesterolaemia. Sugar-beet fibre and inulin showed no metabolic effects. These physiological properties suggest that guar gum would be a suitable ingredient for dietary therapy of chronic diseases such as diabetes mellitus or hyperlipidaemia in the dog. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence of supplemental lighting on the resting behaviour of fattening bulls kept in a stanchion barn
Dechamps, P.; Nicks, Baudouin ULg; Canart, Bernard et al

in Applied Animal Behaviour Science (1989), 22(3-4), 303-311

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See detailInfluence of surface deformability on weakly nonlinear Marangoni instability
Slavtchev, S. G.; Dauby, Pierre ULg; Lebon, Georgy ULg et al

in Viviani, A. (Ed.) Proceedings of the Second European Symposium. Fluids in Space, Napoli, April 22-26, 1996 (1996)

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See detailInfluence of Surface Effect On Nickel Micro Deep Drawing Process
Keller, Clément ULg; Afteni, Mitica; Banu, Mihaela et al

in Proceeding of the Numiform 2010 conference (2010)

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See detailInfluence of Surface Effect on Nickel Micro Deep Drawing Process
Keller, Clément ULg; Afteni, Mitica; Banu, M. et al

in NUMIFORM 2010, VOLS 1 AND 2 (2010)

Detailed reference viewed: 43 (13 ULg)