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See detailMaternal plasma soluble endoglin at 11-13 weeks's gestation in pre-eclampsia
Foidart, Jean-Michel ULg; Munaut, Carine ULg; Chantraine, Frédéric ULg et al

in Ultrasound in Obstetrics & Gynecology (2010), 35(6), 680-7

Objectives: To examine the performance of screening for preeclampsia (PE) by a combination of maternal factors, soluble endoglin (sEng), pregnancy associated plasma protein A (PAPP-A), placental growth ... [more ▼]

Objectives: To examine the performance of screening for preeclampsia (PE) by a combination of maternal factors, soluble endoglin (sEng), pregnancy associated plasma protein A (PAPP-A), placental growth factor (PlGF) and uterine artery lowest pulsatibility index (L-PI) at 11-13 weeks of gestation. Methods: Uterine artery L-PI, sEng, PAPP-A and PlGF were measured at 11-13 weeks in 90 singleton pregnancies that subsequently developed PE, including 30 that required delivery before 34 weeks (early-PE) and 60 with late-PE, and 180 unaffected controls. Screening performance for PE by maternal factors, sEng, PAPP-A, PlGF and uterine artery L-PI and their combinations was determined. Results: In early-PE, compared to controls, plasma sEng and uterine L-PI were significantly increased and serum PAPP-A and PlGF were decreased. In late-PE, compared to controls, serum PlGF was decreased and uterine L-PI was increased but plasma sEng and serum PAPP-A were not significantly different. In screening for early-PE, the detection rate at a 10% false positive rate was 46.7% for sEng alone and 96.3% for a combination of maternal factors, sEng, PlGF and uterine artery L-PI. Conclusions: Effective screening for early-PE can be provided by a combination of maternal factors, sEng, PlGF and uterine artery L-PI at 11-13 weeks. [less ▲]

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See detailMaternal plasma soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 and free vascular endothelial growth factor at 11 to 13 weeks of gestation in preeclampsia.
Akolekar, R.; De Cruz, J.; Foidart, Jean-Michel ULg et al

in Prenatal Diagnosis (2010), 30(3), 191-7

Objective To investigate the maternal plasma concentration of soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFlt-1) and free vascular endothelial growth factor (free-VEGF) at 11 to 13 weeks of gestation in patients ... [more ▼]

Objective To investigate the maternal plasma concentration of soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFlt-1) and free vascular endothelial growth factor (free-VEGF) at 11 to 13 weeks of gestation in patients destined to develop preeclampsia (PE) and to examine whether any possible differences in maternal plasma levels are related to uterine artery pulsatility index (PI) and maternal serum placental growth factor (PlGF). Methods Plasma free-VEGF, plasma sFlt-1, serum PlGF and uterine artery PI were measured at 11 to 13 weeks in 90 cases that subsequently developed PE and in 180 unaffected controls. Results In the majority of cases of PE and controls the levels of free-VEGF were undetectable. In the pregnancies that developed PE, compared to unaffected controls, uterine artery PI was higher, serum PlGF was lower but there was no significant difference in levels of sFlt-1. Conclusion Measurement of free-VEGF and sFlt-1 in maternal blood at 11 to 13 weeks of gestation is not useful in the prediction of pregnancies destined to develop PE [less ▲]

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See detailMaternal stress markers during pregnancy
Tsubouchi, Hiroaki; Shimoya, Koichiro; Song, Myhion et al

Poster (2006)

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See detailMaternal transfer of chlorinated contaminants in the leatherback turtles, Dermochelys coriacea, nesting in French Guiana
Guirlet, Elodie ULg; Das, Krishna ULg; Thomé, Jean-Pierre ULg et al

in Chemosphere (2010), 79(7), 720-726

We examined the maternal transfer of organochlorine contaminants (OCs), pesticides (DDTS and HCHs) 26 and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and the temporal variation of blood and eggs concentrations from ... [more ▼]

We examined the maternal transfer of organochlorine contaminants (OCs), pesticides (DDTS and HCHs) 26 and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and the temporal variation of blood and eggs concentrations from 27 38 leatherback turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) nesting in French Guiana. PCBs were found to be the dom- 28 inant OCs with respective mean concentrations of 55.14 ng g 1 lipid-mass for egg and 1.26 ng mL 1 wet- 29 mass for blood. OC concentrations were lower than concentrations measured in other marine turtles 30 which might be due to the lower trophic position (diet based on gelatinous zooplankton) and to the loca- 31 tion of their foraging and nesting grounds. All OCs detected in leatherback blood were detected in eggs, 32 suggesting a maternal transfer of OCs. This transfer was shown to depend on female blood concentration 33 for RDDTs and for the most prevalent PCB congeners, since significant relationships were found between 34 paired blood–egg concentrations. During the nesting season, OC concentrations in eggs and the percent- 35 age of lipid in eggs were found to decline in successive clutches, highlighting a process of offloading from 36 females to their eggs and a decreasing investment of lipid from females into their clutches. OCs in eggs 37 tended to be higher in females spending 3 years in the foraging grounds between two nesting seasons 38 than in those spending 2 years, suggesting an impact of time spacing two breeding seasons, called remi- 39 gration interval, and of location of the foraging grounds. [less ▲]

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See detailMaternal transfer of mercury to offspring in phocids
Habran, Sarah ULg; Pomeroy, Paddy; Debier, Cathy et al

Conference (2009, June 09)

Marine mammals may display high mercury (Hg) levels in their tissues, which raises the question of the importance of toxic metal transfer from mother to offspring. Indeed, Hg could be transferred from ... [more ▼]

Marine mammals may display high mercury (Hg) levels in their tissues, which raises the question of the importance of toxic metal transfer from mother to offspring. Indeed, Hg could be transferred from mothers to fetuses via the placenta and to suckling pups via the milk, potentially affecting them during their most sensitive periods of development. Some lactating female phocids fast during the suckling period. This fasting period involves not only an important mobilization of energy reserves, but also mobilization of potentially associated contaminants. We studied and compared maternal transfer of Hg to offspring in two phocid species: the northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris) from the Californian coast and the grey seal (Halichoerus grypus) from the Isle of May in Scotland. Total mercury concentrations (THg) were measured in whole blood and maternal milk of 20 mother-pup pairs of each species in early and late lactation. Methylmercury (MeHg) levels were also measured in the blood and milk of grey seals. Results indicated that Hg passed from the maternal tissue into the phocid milk. Milk showed a range of THg levels from 15 to 60 ppb (ng.g-1-wet-weight). From the first days after birth, pups displayed relatively high blood Hg levels suggesting that a Hg transfer through placenta occurred. Blood Hg levels in mothers and pups also varied significantly throughout lactation. While maternal levels doubled, pup levels were reduced by half between the beginning and the end of lactation. Remobilization of proteins and lipids during fasting and milk production in mothers might lead to a release of Hg in blood and therefore increase the levels in late lactation. On the contrary, Hg would be progressively stored in pup organs during their development. Decreasing Hg levels in pups also suggest that the Hg intake via the milk might be lower than that via the placenta. This study highlights a transplacental and transmammary transfer of Hg in both phocid populations. However, further toxicology studies are needed to help understand the potential impact of this Hg transfer. Results also showed that physiological processes such as lactation and/or fasting can modify Hg levels in the blood of mothers and pups. Therefore, such processes and body condition should be considered carefully when interpreting Hg levels in the framework of biomonitoring. [less ▲]

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See detailMaternal transfer of PCBs, PBDEs and their hydroxylated metabolites in grey seal (Halichoerus grypus) from the Isle of May, Scotland
Vanden Berghe, Marie; Weijs, Liesbeth; Habran, Sarah ULg et al

in Organohalogen Compounds (2011)

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See detailMaternal transfer of trace elements in leatherback turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) of French Guiana
Guirlet, Elodie ULg; Das, Krishna ULg; Girondot, Marc

in Aquatic Toxicology (2008), 88

In sea turtles, parental investment is limited to the nutrients and energy invested in eggs that will support embryonic development. Leatherback females have the largest clutches with the biggest eggs of ... [more ▼]

In sea turtles, parental investment is limited to the nutrients and energy invested in eggs that will support embryonic development. Leatherback females have the largest clutches with the biggest eggs of the sea turtles and the highest reproductive output in reptiles. The migration between foraging sites and nesting beaches also represents high energy expenditure. The toxicokinetic of pollutants in the tissues is thus expected to vary during those periods but there is a lack of information in reptiles. Concentrations of essential (Copper, Zinc, Selenium) and non-essentials elements (Cadmium, Lead, Mercury) were determined in blood (n = 78) and eggs (n = 76) of 46 free-ranging leatherback females collected in French Guiana. Maternal transfer to eggs and relationships between blood and eggs concentrations during the nesting seasonwere investigated. All trace elementswere detectable in both tissues. Levels of toxic metals were lower than essential elements likely due to the high pelagic nature of leatherbacks that seems to limit exposure to toxic elements. Significant relationships between blood and egg concentrations were observed for Se and Cd. Se could have an important role in embryonic development of leatherback turtles and Cd transfer could be linked to similar carrier proteins as Se. Finally, as multiple clutcheswere sampled from each female, trends in trace elements were investigated along the nesting season. No change was observed in eggs but changeswere recorded in blood concentrations of Cu. Cu level decreased while blood Pb levels increased through the nesting season. The high demand on the body during the breeding season seems to affect blood Cu concentrations. Calcium requirement for egg production with concomitant Pb mobilization could explain the increase in blood Pb concentrations along the nesting season. [less ▲]

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See detailMaternal transfer of trace metals to offspring in grey seals
Habran, Sarah ULg; Pomeroy, Paddy; Debier, Cathy et al

Conference (2010, May 25)

Marine mammals may display high heavy metal levels in their tissues, which raises the question of the importance of toxic metal transfer from mother to offspring. Some lactating female phocids fast during ... [more ▼]

Marine mammals may display high heavy metal levels in their tissues, which raises the question of the importance of toxic metal transfer from mother to offspring. Some lactating female phocids fast during the suckling period. This fasting period involves not only an important mobilization of energy reserves, but also mobilization of potentially associated contaminants. We studied maternal transfer of trace metals to offspring in the grey seal (Halichoerus grypus). Trace metal concentrations were measured in whole blood, milk and hair of mother-pup pairs in early and late lactation. Metal levels in blood decreased according to the following pattern: Fe > Zn > Se > Cu > Hg > Pb > Cr > V in mothers and pups. Cd and Ni were not detected and V, Cr and Pb levels were very low in maternal and pup blood. However, Ni and Pb levels were detected in the milk showing a transmammary transfer of these metals. Hg levels in blood and milk were higher than levels of previous metals and levels varied significantly throughout lactation. The increasing maternal levels over lactation were likely due to the remobilization of energy reserves during fasting and milk production in mothers causing a Hg release in blood. All metals were detected in hair and lanugo according to the following pattern: Fe > Zn > Hg > Cu > Se > Ni > V > Pb > Cd > Cr in mothers and Zn > Fe > Hg > Se > Cu > Pb > Ni > V > Cr > Cd in pups. Pb levels were relatively high in comparison with other phocid species. Only Hg showed a significant relationship between hair/lanugo and blood levels. This study highlights (i) a transplacental and transmammary transfer of metals in grey seals, and shows that (ii) physiological processes such as lactation and/or fasting can modify trace metal levels in the blood of mothers and pups. [less ▲]

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See detailMaternal transfer of trace metals to offspring in northern elephant seals
Habran, Sarah ULg; Debier, Cathy; Crocker, Daniel et al

Poster (2008, October 30)

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See detailMaternal transisition of dietary omega-3 fatty acids: effects on zootechnical performance and health status of the broiler progeny
Koppenol, A.; Franssens, L.; Everaert, Nadia ULg et al

in Proceedings of the 17th European Society of Veterinary and Comparative Nutrition Congress (2013)

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See detailMaternal transition of prenatal undernutrition in the laying hen
Willems, Els; Wang, Yufeng; Koppenol, Astrid et al

Poster (2013)

Peer Reviewed
See detailMaternal vascular lesions in pre-eclampsia and intrauterine growth retardation: light microscopy and immunofluorescence.
Hustin, J.; Foidart, Jean-Michel ULg; Lambotte, R.

in Placenta (1983), 4

Placental bed biopsies were performed during caesarean section in a series of 137 patients. Analysis of the morphological findings confirms that vascular physiological changes were reduced in pre ... [more ▼]

Placental bed biopsies were performed during caesarean section in a series of 137 patients. Analysis of the morphological findings confirms that vascular physiological changes were reduced in pre-eclampsia and in normotensive intrauterine growth retardation. In pre-eclampsia, acute atherosis in the decidual segments of uteroplacental arteries was a prominent feature. Intimal thickenings of the myometrial segments of the uteromaternal arteries were also noted. Normotensive intrauterine growth retardation cases were characterized by intimal thickenings of the myometrial segments of the uteroplacental arteries. Immunofluorescent investigations have demonstrated that the deep vascular stenoses were not associated with immunoglobulin deposition while in distal arterial segments displaying acute atherosis a positive immunofluorescence for IgG and fibrin and, more irregularly, for C'3 and IgM could be noted. These findings lead us to suggest that an immunological mechanism may be involved in the pathogenesis of acute atherosis. [less ▲]

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See detailLa maternité des déesses grecques et les déesses-mères : entre mythe, rite et fantasme
Pirenne-Delforge, Vinciane ULg

in Clio : Histoire, Femmes et Sociétés (2005), 21

The first part shows how, in the Hesiodic Theogony, the word « mother » is applied to goddesses who construct a specific attachment to their children, above and beyond the genealogical link. The second ... [more ▼]

The first part shows how, in the Hesiodic Theogony, the word « mother » is applied to goddesses who construct a specific attachment to their children, above and beyond the genealogical link. The second part considers why at Elis, Athena was called « mother », comparing this situation with Athens. A brief conclusion comes back to the historiographical illusion of a generic « Mothergoddess » in the Greek world. [less ▲]

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See detailMaternité et divinité en Grèce antique : l’exemple de Déméter
Pirenne-Delforge, Vinciane ULg

in Dermenjian, G.; Guilhaumou, J.; Lapied, M. (Eds.) La puissance maternelle en Méditerranée. Mythes et représentations (2008)

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See detailMath et Manips à l'école primaire. Favoriser l'apprentissage des grandeurs par des manipulations
Guissard, Marie-France; Henry, Valérie ULg

in Losanges (2011), 15

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See detailMathémagie 2
Rigo, Michel ULg

Speech (2012)

Nous présentons ici des tours de magie ne nécessitant aucune habileté particulière de la part de l'apprenti magicien : des tours de cartes, des tours de divination etc. Contrairement au magicien qui ne ... [more ▼]

Nous présentons ici des tours de magie ne nécessitant aucune habileté particulière de la part de l'apprenti magicien : des tours de cartes, des tours de divination etc. Contrairement au magicien qui ne dévoile jamais ses secrets, ici, nous expliquons que ces tours reposent sur diverses propriétés et constructions mathématiques (décomposition d'une permutation en produit de cycle, suites linéaires récurrentes, ...). Il y en aura donc pour tous les goûts... et tous les niveaux. Dans la mesure du possible, nous présenterons de "nouveaux" tours qui n'auraient pas déjà été dévoilés dans un exposé précédent. [less ▲]

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See detailMathémagie et au-delà
Rigo, Michel ULg

Learning material (2010)

Nous présentons ici 5 tours de magie ne nécessitant aucune habileté particulière de la part de l'apprenti magicien : des tours de cartes, des tours de divination et le célèbre tour du ``barman aveugle ... [more ▼]

Nous présentons ici 5 tours de magie ne nécessitant aucune habileté particulière de la part de l'apprenti magicien : des tours de cartes, des tours de divination et le célèbre tour du ``barman aveugle avec des gants de boxe''. Contrairement au magicien qui ne dévoile jamais ses secrets, ici, nous expliquons que ces tours reposent sur diverses propriétés et constructions mathématiques. Ces dernières débouchent sur de véritables questions de recherche actuelle en théorie des graphes ou en combinatoire des mots et même sur de possibles applications en robotique et automatisation ! Il y en aura donc pour tous les goûts... et tous les niveaux (suivant l'auditoire, l'exposé sera adapté au niveau des élèves de la 4ième à la 6ième secondaire, voire même aux étudiants universitaires). Ce texte présente donc un matériel qui dépassera souvent (et de loin) le ``spectacle''. [less ▲]

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See detailMathémagie III
Rigo, Michel ULg

Speech (2013)

Cet exposé est dans la continuité de mes précédentes prestations comme apprenti-magicien. Il s'adresse au plus grand nombre et ne nécessite pas de prérequis particulier. Je réaliserai 6 ou 7 tours de ... [more ▼]

Cet exposé est dans la continuité de mes précédentes prestations comme apprenti-magicien. Il s'adresse au plus grand nombre et ne nécessite pas de prérequis particulier. Je réaliserai 6 ou 7 tours de "mathémagie" (tours de cartes, divination, mentalisme,...). Pour chaque tour, le scénario sera identique : réalisation du tour, explication, mise en évidence des structures et résultats mathématiques sous-jacents et enfin, illustration de ces concepts mathématiques mis en oeuvre dans d'autres contextes (informatique, théorie de l'information, ...) [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 103 (9 ULg)