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See detailGrowth hormone and insulin like growth factor in double muscled Belgian Blue bulls during slow and subsequent accelerated growth
Van Eenaeme, Christian ULiege; Hornick, Jean-Luc ULiege; Gauthier, Sabine et al

in Proceedings of the Society of Nutrition Physiology (1994)

Detailed reference viewed: 17 (1 ULiège)
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See detailGrowth Hormone and parturition adversely influence immuno-reactive Plasma Insulin-like Growth Factor Binding Protein-2 in Cattle
Vleurick, Lieve; Vandehaar, Michael; Bertozzi, Carlo et al

in Growth Regulation (1999), 9

Detailed reference viewed: 12 (0 ULiège)
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See detailGrowth hormone and parturition adversely influence immunoreactive plasma insulin-like growth factor binding protein-2 in cattle.
Vleurick, Lieve; Vandehaar, M.; Bertozzi, Carlo et al

in Growth Hormone & IGF Research (1999)

Detailed reference viewed: 8 (1 ULiège)
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See detailGrowth hormone and prolactin stimulate androgen receptor, insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and IGF-I receptor levels in the prostate of immature rats.
Reiter, E.; Bonnet, Pierre ULiege; Sente, B. et al

in Molecular & Cellular Endocrinology (1992), 88(1-3), 77-87

In this study we investigated the involvement of several different pituitary hormones on rat prostate development. 22-day-old Wistar rats, hypophysectomized (hypox) at 19 days of age were supplemented ... [more ▼]

In this study we investigated the involvement of several different pituitary hormones on rat prostate development. 22-day-old Wistar rats, hypophysectomized (hypox) at 19 days of age were supplemented with highly purified human prolactin (hPRL), human luteinizing hormone (hLH), porcine follicle-stimulating hormone (pFSH), and bovine growth hormone (bGH) or with saline. Quantitative analysis of RNAs shows that treatment with either PRL or GH increases significantly steady-state mRNAs levels of the following genes in the prostate: androgen receptor (AR) (respectively 3.5- and 4.8-fold above hypox controls), IGF-I (5- and 2.7-fold), and IGF-I receptor (2.9- and 2.3-fold). LH and FSH, by contrast, have negative effects on these parameters. To test whether the enhancing effect of PRL and GH on AR-mRNA abundance was followed by increased content in the protein itself, binding assays were performed with the androgen agonist [3H]R1881 (131 and 153 fmol/mg protein while hypox controls contained 110 fmol/mg protein). In addition to the well-documented presence of prolactin receptors in prostatic tissues, we have further demonstrated, by means of nuclease S1 protection assays plus dot- and Northern-blot analyses, that a GH receptor mRNA is produced in the immature rat prostate. Moreover, we observed not only strong lactogenic but also purely somatogenic binding to be occurring in the immature prostates. Finally, we have studied IGF-I mRNA content in separated epithelial/stromal cell fractions and have concluded that IGF-I expression is principally located in the prostatic stroma. Taken together, these results suggest that PRL and GH are involved in regulating AR synthesis, at least partially by direct action on the organ. In this context IGF-I appears as a paracrine factor playing a role in epithelium/stroma interactions during prostatic development. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 45 (2 ULiège)
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See detailGrowth hormone and somatostatin gene expression in pituitary adenomas with active acromegaly and minimal plasma growth hormone elevation
Pagesy, Patrick; Li, Jacques Y.; Rentier-Delrue, Françoise ULiege et al

in Acta Endocrinologica (1990), 122(6), 745-752

Some patients with active acromegaly have elevated plasma IGF-I concentrations with only minimal elevation of plasma GH. We compared adenomatous GH and SRIH expression in 3 such patients (patients No. 1 ... [more ▼]

Some patients with active acromegaly have elevated plasma IGF-I concentrations with only minimal elevation of plasma GH. We compared adenomatous GH and SRIH expression in 3 such patients (patients No. 1, 2 and 3; basal plasma GH level < 4 µg/l) and in 3 acromegalic patients with high basal plasma GH level (patients No. 4, 5 and 6; 51.7 ± 16.1 µg/l, mean ± SEM). By immunocytochemistry, all the tumours proved to be somatotropic adenomas. At the ultrastructural level, signs of low secretory activity were observed in adenomas from patients No. 2 and 3. Perifused adenoma cells of patients No. 1, 2 and 3 released very little GH compared with those of patients No. 4, 5 and 6 (1± 0.37 vs 51.5± 34.1 µg · (10–6 cells) · min–1, p< 0.001). Adenoma SRIH content was 65.7 and 30.6 pg/mg proteins in patients No. 1 and 2, whereas it was undetectable in the others (patients No. 4, 5 and 6). Northern blot analysis showed that the GH gene was poorly expressed in the adenomas from patients No. 1, 2 and 3 compared with the adenomas from patients No. 4, 5 and 6. SRIH mRNA was detected in all 6 adenomas. However, the signal was more intense in the adenomas from patients No. 1, 2 and 3 than in those from patients No. 4, 5 and 6. In conclusion, because of the variability of the biosynthetic and secretory potential of the somatotropic adenomas, patients harbouring this type of pituitary tumours can exhibit a wide range of plasma GH levels. In acromegaly with minimal elevation of plasma GH, the synthesis of SRIH by the adenoma cells themselves could play a role in the inhibition of GH expression. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 15 (1 ULiège)
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See detailGrowth hormone binding protein (GHBP) during lactation in cows
Renaville, Robert ULiege; Prandi, Alberto; Massart, Serge et al

in Archivio Veterinario Italiano (1998), 48

Detailed reference viewed: 21 (1 ULiège)
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See detailGrowth hormone binding protein (GHBP) during lactation in cows.
Renaville, Robert ULiege; Prandi, A.; Massart, Serge et al

in Archivio Veterinario Italiano (1999), 50

Detailed reference viewed: 11 (1 ULiège)
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See detailGrowth hormone gene expression in eukaryotic cells directed by the Rous sarcoma virus long terminal repeat or cytomegalovirus immediate-early promoter.
Pasleau, Françoise ULiege; Tocci, M. J.; Leung, F. C. et al

in Gene. (1985), 38

The cytomegalovirus (CMV) immediate-early (IE) gene-regulatory region was found to be three- to fourfold more efficient than the Rous sarcoma retroviral long terminal repeat (LTR) in promoting expression ... [more ▼]

The cytomegalovirus (CMV) immediate-early (IE) gene-regulatory region was found to be three- to fourfold more efficient than the Rous sarcoma retroviral long terminal repeat (LTR) in promoting expression of the bovine growth hormone (bGH) gene by rat GH3 cells. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (0 ULiège)
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See detailGrowth hormone receptor amino-acid sequence variability
Sneyers, Myriam; Renaville, Robert ULiege; Devolder, Anne et al

in Archives Internationales de Physiologie, de Biochimie et de Biophysique (1992), 100

Detailed reference viewed: 8 (0 ULiège)
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See detailGrowth hormone releasing hormone excess and blockade in X-LAG syndrome.
Daly, Adrian Francis ULiege; Lysy, Philippe; Defilles, Celine et al

in Endocrine-related cancer (2016)

X-linked acrogigantism (X-LAG) syndrome is a newly-described form of inheritable pituitary gigantism that begins in early childhood and is usually associated with markedly elevated growth hormone (GH) and ... [more ▼]

X-linked acrogigantism (X-LAG) syndrome is a newly-described form of inheritable pituitary gigantism that begins in early childhood and is usually associated with markedly elevated growth hormone (GH) and prolactin secretion by mixed pituitary adenomas/hyperplasia. Microduplications on chromosome Xq26.3 including the GPR101 gene cause X-LAG syndrome. In individual cases random GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) levels have been elevated. We performed a series of hormonal profiles in a young female sporadic X-LAG syndrome patient and subsequently undertook in vitro studies of primary pituitary tumor culture following neurosurgical resection. The patient demonstrated consistently elevated circulating GHRH levels throughout preoperative testing, which was accompanied by marked GH and prolactin hypersecretion; GH demonstrated a paradoxical increase following TRH administration. In vitro, the pituitary cells showed baseline GH and prolactin release that was further stimulated by GHRH administration. Co-incubation with GHRH and the GHRH receptor antagonist, acetyl-(D-Arg(2))-GHRH (1-29) amide, blocked the GHRH-induced GH stimulation; the GHRH receptor antagonist alone significantly reduced GH release. Pasireotide, but not octreotide, inhibited GH secretion. A ghrelin receptor agonist and an inverse agonist led to modest, statistically significant increases and decreases in GH secretion, respectively. GHRH hypersecretion can accompany the pituitary abnormalities seen in X-LAG syndrome. These data suggest that the pathology of X-LAG syndrome may include hypothalamic dysregulation of GHRH secretion, which is in keeping with localization of GPR101 in the hypothalamus. Therapeutic blockade of GHRH secretion could represent a way to target the marked hormonal hypersecretion and overgrowth that characterizes X-LAG syndrome. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 46 (18 ULiège)
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See detailGrowth hormone response to apomorphine in obsessive-compulsive disorder.
Pitchot, William ULiege; Hansenne, Michel ULiege; Moreno, A. G. et al

in Journal of Psychiatry & Neuroscience [=JPN] (1996), 21(5), 343-5

Several lines of evidence suggest that dopamine plays a role in the pathophysiology of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Indeed, some trials have shown the efficacy of neuroleptic addition in the ... [more ▼]

Several lines of evidence suggest that dopamine plays a role in the pathophysiology of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Indeed, some trials have shown the efficacy of neuroleptic addition in the treatment of OCD patients. In this study, we assessed the growth hormone (GH) response to 0.5 mg apomorphine(sc) in 8 drug-free inpatients (6 male, 2 female; mean age +/- SD = 34.7 +/- 12.6) meeting DSM-III-R criteria for OCD without major depression and compared their responses with those of 8 healthy male volunteers (mean age = 27.1 +/- 8.5). The groups did not differ in their mean GH peak response: 12.4 +/- 9.7 ng/mL in OCD patients versus 21.1 +/- 14.2 ng/mL in normal controls (F = 0.9, df1, 14, P = 0.37). These results do not support the hypothesis of dopaminergic overactivity in OCD. In fact, the completely blunted GH response to apomorphine in 2 OCD patients suggests the biological heterogeneity of OCD. Some dopaminergic disturbances could be observed in patients with comorbid diagnoses or patients unresponsive to serotonin reuptake inhibitors, but the results of this study require confirmation from a larger sample with a precise assessment of comorbidity. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 43 (3 ULiège)
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See detailGrowth hormone response to apomorphine in panic disorder: comparison with major depression and normal controls.
Pichot, W.; Hansenne, Michel ULiege; Gonzalez Moreno, A. et al

in European Archives of Psychiatry & Clinical Neuroscience (1995), 245(6), 306-8

Several lines of evidence suggest that dopamine might be involved in anxiety states. In the present study we assessed the growth hormone (GH) response to 0.5 mg apomorphine (a dopaminergic agonist) in 10 ... [more ▼]

Several lines of evidence suggest that dopamine might be involved in anxiety states. In the present study we assessed the growth hormone (GH) response to 0.5 mg apomorphine (a dopaminergic agonist) in 10 male drug-free inpatients meeting Research Diagnostic Criteria for panic disorder who were compared with 10 male major depressive inpatients and 10 male normal controls. The three groups differed significantly in the GH peak response (mean +/- SD): 27.8 +/- 12.5 ng/ml in panics, 5.4 +/- 4.0 ng/ml in major depressives, and 25.8 +/- 11.3 ng/ml in normal controls (F(2,27) = 15.3; P = 0.00003). Although there were significant differences between panics and major depressives (P = 0.00004), and between major depressives and controls (P = 0.00004), panics did not significantly differ from controls. These results do not support the hypothesis of an overlap between panic and affective disorders, and suggest that the hypothalamo-GH-somatomedin axis could be intact in panic disorder. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 24 (2 ULiège)
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See detailGrowth hormone response to clonidine in male untreated panic patients
Scittecatte, Michel; ANSSEAU, Marc ULiege; Charles, Gerard et al

in Psychological Medicine (1992)

Detailed reference viewed: 16 (0 ULiège)
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See detailGrowth hormone response to clonidine in nondepressed patients with a history of suicide attempts.
Pitchot, William ULiege; Hansenne, Michel ULiege; Moreno, A. G. et al

in Biological Psychiatry (1995), 38(3), 201-3

Detailed reference viewed: 21 (4 ULiège)
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See detailGrowth hormone response to thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) in oral contraceptive treated women
Beckers, Albert ULiege; Vandalem, J. L.

Conference (1985)

Detailed reference viewed: 10 (3 ULiège)
See detailGrowth hormone secretion during pregnancy in an acromegalic woman
Petrossians, Patrick ULiege; Chanson, P.; Schaison, G. et al

in 10th international Congress of Endocrinology - Abstract book (1996)

Detailed reference viewed: 14 (0 ULiège)
See detailGrowth hormone treatment in adult: fisrt year results
Beckers, Albert ULiege

Scientific conference (1995, March 17)

Detailed reference viewed: 12 (0 ULiège)
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See detailGrowth hormone, Insulin-like growth factor-I and their plasma binding proteins in different cattle breeds
Renaville, Robert ULiege; Devolder, Anne; Shojae, Djalil et al

in Zootecnica e Nutrizione Animale (1995), 21

Detailed reference viewed: 4 (0 ULiège)