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See detailHeap leaching for sustainable development in the South African PGM industry
Mwase Malumbo, James ULg; Petersen, Jochen; Eksteen, Jacques J

in Proceedings of Hydrometallurgy 2014, 7th International Symposium, Vol. II (2014, June)

The platinum group metal (PGM) industry is currently reliant on the crush-mill-float-smelt-refine route to process PGM ores. However, there are many instances where this route would not be feasible. An ... [more ▼]

The platinum group metal (PGM) industry is currently reliant on the crush-mill-float-smelt-refine route to process PGM ores. However, there are many instances where this route would not be feasible. An alternative process route has been developed which involves heap bioleaching to extract base metals followed by heap reclamation and a water wash step, leading into heap cyanide leaching to extract precious metals. This process was evaluated through test work on samples of Platreef ore using laboratory scale columns. After 304 days 75% Ni and 93% Cu were extracted in the bioleach experiment at 65°C, and after 60 days 58% Pt, 99% Pd and 90% Au in the follow-up cyanide leach experiment at 50°C. A preliminary process flow sheet has been developed around this. Analysis via a mineral liberation analyser showed that the remaining Pt was in the form of the mineral sperrylite, which appeared to be slow leaching in cyanide in comparison to the other mineral types. Analysis of cyanide effluent solution showed high levels of thiocyanate, which present an environmental risk for disposal and high consumption of cyanide. Further studies to develop the process for commercial application in the South African PGM industry are outlined. [less ▲]

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See detailHearing ability in three clownfish species
Parmentier, Eric ULg; Colleye, Orphal ULg; Mann, David

in Journal of Experimental Biology (2009), 212

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See detailHearing and morphological specializations of the mojarra (Eucinostomus argenteus)
Parmentier, Eric ULg; Mann, Kenneth; Mann, David

in Journal of Experimental Biology (2011), 214

The air-filled swimbladder acts as an acoustic amplifier for some fish by converting sound pressure into particle motion, which is transmitted to the inner ear. Here, we describe in detail the specialized ... [more ▼]

The air-filled swimbladder acts as an acoustic amplifier for some fish by converting sound pressure into particle motion, which is transmitted to the inner ear. Here, we describe in detail the specialized connection between the swimbladder and ear in the mojarra, as well as a modified cone on the anal fin in which the posterior end of the swimbladder sits. Hearing tests show the mojarra has better hearing sensitivity than other species of fish without a connection. However, mojarras do not seem to use this adaptation for communication. Furthermore, the inclined position of the swimbladder may help the fish to catch their prey more easily, as the swimbladder will be horizontal when they are picking up benthic prey. [less ▲]

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See detailHearing capacities and otolith size in two ophidiiform species (Ophidion rochei and Carapus acus)
Kever, Loïc ULg; Colleye, Orphal ULg; Herrel, Anthony et al

in Journal of Experimental Biology (2014), 217

Detailed reference viewed: 34 (4 ULg)
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See detailHearing in Damselfishes
Colleye, Orphal ULg; Parmentier, Eric ULg; Kever, Loïc ULg

in Frederich, Bruno; Parmentier, Eric (Eds.) Biology of Damselfishes (2016)

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See detailThe hearing officer's extended mandate: whose special friend in the conduct of EU competition proceedings?
Van Cleynenbreugel, Pieter ULg

in European Competition Law Review (2012)

The Commission's Hearing Officer mandate has been extended in a 2011 Decision, permitting the Officer to intervene more actively in competition law procedures. This article summarises and critically ... [more ▼]

The Commission's Hearing Officer mandate has been extended in a 2011 Decision, permitting the Officer to intervene more actively in competition law procedures. This article summarises and critically assesses those new powers. [less ▲]

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See detailHearing Preservation in Cochlear Implantation and Drug Treatment.
Barriat, Sébastien ULg; Poirrier, Anne-Lise ULg; Malgrange, Brigitte ULg et al

in Advances in Oto-Rhino-Laryngology (2010), 67

Insertion of an electrode array into the cochlea produces immediate damage to the inner ear, which is responsible for a hearing loss. In addition, a delayed hearing loss can be observed. In order to ... [more ▼]

Insertion of an electrode array into the cochlea produces immediate damage to the inner ear, which is responsible for a hearing loss. In addition, a delayed hearing loss can be observed. In order to maximize hearing preservation after insertion of an electrode and to enhance the performance of the cochlear implant, it has been proposed to deliver pharmacological agents to the inner ear. Molecules can be administered locally to the inner ear through a direct perilymphatic perfusion or through the round window membrane. These modalities of treatment have already been successfully applied to some patients with inner ear diseases. In this paper, we will review some basic aspects of drug delivery to the inner ear to prevent the degeneration of the neurosensory hair cells and auditory neurons, and the actual applicability to humans in order to maintain hearing function after the insertion of electrodes of a cochlear implant. [less ▲]

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See detailHearing sensitivity of the painted goby, Pomatoschistus pictus.
Bolgan, Marta ULg; Pedroso, Silvia S.; Vasconcelos, Raquel O. et al

in Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology (2012)

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See detailHearing “quack” and remembering a duck: Evidence for fluency attribution in young children
Geurten, Marie ULg; Lloyd, Marianne; Willems, Sylvie ULg

in Child Development (2017), 88(2), 514-522

Previous research has suggested that fluency does not influence memory decisions until age 7-8. In two experiments (n=96 and n=64, respectively), children, aged 4, 6, and 8 years (Experiment 1-2), and ... [more ▼]

Previous research has suggested that fluency does not influence memory decisions until age 7-8. In two experiments (n=96 and n=64, respectively), children, aged 4, 6, and 8 years (Experiment 1-2), and adults (Experiment 2) studied a list of pictures. Participants completed a recognition test during which each study item was preceded by a sound providing either a highly predictive or mildly predictive context in order to make some test items more conceptually fluent. Overall, highly predictive items were recognized at a higher rate than mildly predictive items demonstrating an earlier development of the fluency heuristic than previously observed. The study provides insight on how children develop metacognitive expectations and when they start to use them to guide their memory responses. [less ▲]

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See detailHeart 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase activation by insulin requires PKB (protein kinase B), but not SGK3 (serum- and glucocorticoid-induced protein kinase 3).
Mouton, Veronique; Toussaint, Louise ULg; Vertommen, Didier et al

in Biochemical Journal (2010), 431(2), 267-75

On the basis of transfection experiments using a dominant-negative approach, our previous studies suggested that PKB (protein kinase B) was not involved in heart PFK-2 (6-phosphofructo2-kinase) activation ... [more ▼]

On the basis of transfection experiments using a dominant-negative approach, our previous studies suggested that PKB (protein kinase B) was not involved in heart PFK-2 (6-phosphofructo2-kinase) activation by insulin. Therefore we first tested whether SGK3 (serum- and glucocorticoid-induced protein kinase 3) might be involved in this effect. Treatment of recombinant heart PFK-2 with [gamma-32P]ATP and SGK3 in vitro led to PFK-2 activation and phosphorylation at Ser466 and Ser483. However, in HEK-293T cells [HEK (human embryonic kidney)-293 cells expressing the large T-antigen of SV40 (simian virus 40)] co-transfected with SGK3 siRNA (small interfering RNA) and heart PFK-2, insulin-induced heart PFK-2 activation was unaffected. The involvement of PKB in heart PFK-2 activation by insulin was re-evaluated using different models: (i) hearts from transgenic mice with a muscle/heart-specific mutation in the PDK1 (phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1)-substrate-docking site injected with insulin; (ii) hearts from PKBbeta-deficient mice injected with insulin; (iii) freshly isolated rat cardiomyocytes and perfused hearts treated with the selective Akti-1/2 PKB inhibitor prior to insulin treatment; and (iv) HEK-293T cells co-transfected with heart PFK-2, and PKBalpha/beta siRNA or PKBalpha siRNA, incubated with insulin. Together, the results indicated that SGK3 is not required for insulin-induced PFK-2 activation and that this effect is likely mediated by PKBalpha. [less ▲]

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See detailHeart failure assessment with a multiscale model
Negroni, Jorge; Cabrera-Fischer, Edmundo; Kosta, Sarah ULg et al

Poster (2016, April 21)

Many cardiac diseases lead to heart failure (HF) causing increasing morbidity and mortality worldwide. Several alterations at the myocyte level have been identified, but their specific influence on ... [more ▼]

Many cardiac diseases lead to heart failure (HF) causing increasing morbidity and mortality worldwide. Several alterations at the myocyte level have been identified, but their specific influence on contractile and hemodynamic impairment is not yet clear. Mathematical modeling is a tool to address this issue enabling the analysis of individual myocyte changes on the overall circulatory response. Some myocyte models have been able to reproduce the impact of HF on experimentally detected myocyte components (1), but their integration into a ventricular model forming part of a multiscale circulatory approach has not been fully undertaken. Thus, the aim of this study is to compare the experimental hemodynamic and regional contractile response to acute HF versus a multiscale model based on a human myocyte representation. The experimentally-validated multiscale model shows adequate coupling between myocyte-derived left ventricular chamber and circulatory properties , and would be useful to predict the contractile and hemodynamic response to HF changes in myocyte variables. [less ▲]

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See detailHeart Graft Monitoring by the Ventricular Evoked Response
Mahaux, V.; Demoulin, J.C.; BIESSAUX, Yves ULg et al

in Pacing & Clinical Electrophysiology (2000), 23(11, Pt 2), 2003-5

Monitoring of the negative slew rate of the evoked T wave has been proposed as a noninvasive diagnostic tool to follow heart transplant recipients. The clinical contribution of this measurement on ... [more ▼]

Monitoring of the negative slew rate of the evoked T wave has been proposed as a noninvasive diagnostic tool to follow heart transplant recipients. The clinical contribution of this measurement on telemetrically recorded, paced unipolar ventricular electrograms was evaluated in the detection of grade 3 acute allograft rejection. Thirteen patients undergoing heart transplantation received a DDD pacemaker connected to two epimyocardial leads. Electrograms were recorded and digitized after each endomyocardial biopsy (EMB). The maximum slew rate of the descending slope of the repolarization phase (RSP) was extracted and normalized. A 20% downward shift of RSP from the reference value was considered abnormal. Results of signal processing were blinded during the first 6 months. Eleven patients completed the 6 months blinded period and two patients died. A total of 101 EMB were graded according to the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation classification. Grade 3 was assigned to 9 EMB. A significant difference was found between RSP values measured during grade 3 rejection episodes and other RSP values (P < 0.001). A diagnostic model consisting of a single threshold test confirmed the ability of RSP to predict significant signs of rejection on EMB (P < 0.0001). The sensitivity of RSP in detecting grade 3 rejections was 100%, specificity was 81%, negative predictive value 100%, and positive predictive value 35%. The use of RSP as a noninvasive monitoring tool to pose the indication for a biopsy would avoid 73% of EMB. Monitoring of transplanted hearts based on the analysis of the ventricular evoked response is promising and may markedly reduce the number of EMB. [less ▲]

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See detailHeart of Darkness: Notes
Maes-Jelinek, Hena ULg

Book published by Longman (2001)

Detailed reference viewed: 14 (2 ULg)
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See detailHeart rate and spontaneous work-rest cycles during exposure to heat
Vogt, J. J.; Libert, J. P.; Candas, V. et al

in Ergonomics (1983), 26(12), 1173-85

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See detailHeart rate and use of beta-blockers in stable outpatients with coronary artery disease.
Steg, Ph Gabriel; Ferrari, Roberto; Ford, Ian et al

in PLoS ONE (2012), 7(5), 36284

BACKGROUND: Heart rate (HR) is an emerging risk factor in coronary artery disease (CAD). However, there is little contemporary data regarding HR and the use of HR-lowering medications, particularly beta ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Heart rate (HR) is an emerging risk factor in coronary artery disease (CAD). However, there is little contemporary data regarding HR and the use of HR-lowering medications, particularly beta-blockers, among patients with stable CAD in routine clinical practice. The goal of the present analysis was to describe HR in such patients, overall and in relation to beta-blocker use, and to describe the determinants of HR. METHODS AND FINDINGS: CLARIFY is an international, prospective, observational, longitudinal registry of outpatients with stable CAD, defined as prior myocardial infarction or revascularization procedure, evidence of coronary stenosis of >50%, or chest pain associated with proven myocardial ischemia. A total of 33,438 patients from 45 countries in Europe, the Americas, Africa, Middle East, and Asia/Pacific were enrolled between November 2009 and July 2010. Most of the 33,177 patients included in this analysis were men (77.5%). Mean (SD) age was 64.2 (10.5) years, HR by pulse was 68.3 (10.6) bpm, and by electrocardiogram was 67.2 (11.4) bpm. Overall, 44.0% had HR >/= 70 bpm. Beta-blockers were used in 75.1% of patients and another 14.4% had intolerance or contraindications to beta-blocker therapy. Among 24,910 patients on beta-blockers, 41.1% had HR >/= 70 bpm. HR >/= 70 bpm was independently associated with higher prevalence and severity of angina, more frequent evidence of myocardial ischemia, and lack of use of HR-lowering agents. CONCLUSIONS: Despite a high rate of use of beta-blockers, stable CAD patients often have resting HR >/= 70 bpm, which was associated with an overall worse health status, more frequent angina and ischemia. Further HR lowering is possible in many patients with CAD. Whether it will improve symptoms and outcomes is being tested. [less ▲]

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See detailHeart rate decrease induced by BPDZ 259, a diazoxide analogue
Damas, J.; Pirotte, Bernard ULg

Poster (2000, November 18)

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See detailHeart rate variability as a measure of comfort in the anaesthetised horse
Lacroix, Alice; Gougnard, Alexandra ULg; Cerri, Simona ULg et al

Poster (2015)

Detailed reference viewed: 38 (9 ULg)
See detailHeart rate variability in infants with obstructive sleep apnea
Massin, M. M.; Withofs, Nadia ULg; Ravet, Françoise ULg

in Archives de Pédiatrie (2002), 9(4), 444-445

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See detailHeart rate variability: a tool to explore the sleeping brain?
Chouchou, Florian; Desseilles, Martin ULg

in Frontiers in neuroscience (2014), 8

Sleep is divided into two main sleep stages: (1) non-rapid eye movement sleep (non-REMS), characterized among others by reduced global brain activity; and (2) rapid eye movement sleep (REMS ... [more ▼]

Sleep is divided into two main sleep stages: (1) non-rapid eye movement sleep (non-REMS), characterized among others by reduced global brain activity; and (2) rapid eye movement sleep (REMS), characterized by global brain activity similar to that of wakefulness. Results of heart rate variability (HRV) analysis, which is widely used to explore autonomic modulation, have revealed higher parasympathetic tone during normal non-REMS and a shift toward sympathetic predominance during normal REMS. Moreover, HRV analysis combined with brain imaging has identified close connectivity between autonomic cardiac modulation and activity in brain areas such as the amygdala and insular cortex during REMS, but no connectivity between brain and cardiac activity during non-REMS. There is also some evidence for an association between HRV and dream intensity and emotionality. Following some technical considerations, this review addresses how brain activity during sleep contributes to changes in autonomic cardiac activity, organized into three parts: (1) the knowledge on autonomic cardiac control, (2) differences in brain and autonomic activity between non-REMS and REMS, and (3) the potential of HRV analysis to explore the sleeping brain, and the implications for psychiatric disorders. [less ▲]

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