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See detailHuman papillomavirus entry into NK cells requires CD16 expression and triggers cytotoxic activity and cytokine secretion
Renoux, Virginie; Bisig, Bettina; Langers, Inge ULg et al

Poster (2013, May)

Human papillomavirus (HPV) infections account for more than 50% of infection-linked cancers in women worldwide. The immune system controls, at least partially, viral infection and around 90% of HPV ... [more ▼]

Human papillomavirus (HPV) infections account for more than 50% of infection-linked cancers in women worldwide. The immune system controls, at least partially, viral infection and around 90% of HPV-infected women clear the virus within two years. However, it remains unclear which immune cells are implicated in this process and no study has evaluated the direct interaction between HPVs and NK cells, a key player in host resistance to viruses and tumors. We demonstrated an NK-cell infiltration in HPV- associated preneoplastic cervical lesions. Since HPVs cannot grow in vitro, virus-like particles (VLPs) were used as a model for studying the NK-cell response against the virus. Interestingly, NK cells displayed higher cytotoxic activity and cytokine production (TNF-a and IFN-g) in the presence of HPV-VLPs. Using flow cytometry and microscopy, we observed that NK-cell stimulation was linked to rapid VLP entry into these cells by macropinocytosis. Using CD16+ and CD16- NK-cell lines and a CD16-blocking antibody, we demonstrated that CD16 is necessary for HPV–VLP internalization, as well as for degranulation and cytokine production. Thus, we show for the first time that NK cells interact with HPVs and can participate in the immune response against HPV-induced lesions. [less ▲]

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See detailHuman papillomavirus entry into NK cells requires CD16 expression and triggers cytotoxic activity and cytokine secretion.
Renoux, Virginie ULg; Bisig, Bettina ULg; Langers, Inge ULg et al

in European journal of immunology (2011), 41(11), 3240-3252

Human papillomavirus (HPV) infections account for more than 50% of infection-linked cancers in women worldwide. The immune system controls, at least partially, viral infection and around 90% of HPV ... [more ▼]

Human papillomavirus (HPV) infections account for more than 50% of infection-linked cancers in women worldwide. The immune system controls, at least partially, viral infection and around 90% of HPV-infected women clear the virus within two years. However, it remains unclear which immune cells are implicated in this process and no study has evaluated the direct interaction between HPVs and NK cells, a key player in host resistance to viruses and tumors. We demonstrated an NK cell infiltration in HPV-associated pre-neoplastic cervical lesions. Since HPVs cannot grow in vitro, virus-like particles (VLPs) were used as a model for studying the NK cell response against the virus. Interestingly, NK cells displayed higher cytotoxic activity and cytokine production (TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma) in the presence of HPV-VLPs. Using flow cytometry and microscopy we observed that NK cell stimulation was linked to rapid VLP entry into these cells by macropinocytosis. Using CD16(+) and CD16(-) NK cell lines and a CD16-blocking antibody, we demonstrated that CD16 is necessary for HPV-VLP internalization, as well as for degranulation and cytokine production. Thus, we show for the first time that NK cells interact with HPVs and can participate in the immune response against HPV-induced lesions. [less ▲]

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See detailHuman papillomavirus entry into NK cells requires CD16 expression and triggers cytotoxic activity and cytokine secretion.
Renoux, Virginie; Langers, Inge; Dortu, Estelle et al

Conference (2013, January 28)

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See detailHuman papillomavirus predicts the outcome following concomitant chemoradiotherapy in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinomas.
Duray, Anaelle; Descamps, Geraldine; Decaestecker, Christine et al

in Oncology Reports (2013), 30(1), 371-6

We investigated the prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) in a clinical series of 72 patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) using a retrospective and prospective study design. The ... [more ▼]

We investigated the prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) in a clinical series of 72 patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) using a retrospective and prospective study design. The majority of patients were smokers and/or drinkers and were treated with concomitant chemoradiotherapy (CCR). Furthermore, we assessed the impact of HPV positivity on the response to CCR. Paraffin-embedded samples from HNSCC patients (n=72) were evaluated for the presence of HPV DNA using both GP5+/GP6+ consensus PCR and type-specific E6/E7 PCR to detect HPV types 6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52, 53, 56, 58, 59, 66, 67 and 68. The type-specific E6/E7 PCR demonstrated that 20 out of 69 HNSCC patients (29%) presented with high-risk (HR) HPV types and that 5 of the 69 HNSCC patients (7%) presented with low-risk (LR) HPV types. Using the GP5+/GP6+ PCR, we observed that the rate of response was statistically lower in the HPV+ group (P=0.02). Concerning patient outcomes in terms of recurrence and survival, we observed that the prognosis was poorer for HPV+ patients. We showed for the first time that patients with HPV+ HNSCC present with a worse prognosis after CCR. This observation highlights the need for prospective studies with large numbers of patients and a detailed history of tobacco and alcohol consumption before validating HPV as a marker of prognosis following CCR. [less ▲]

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See detailHuman papillomavirus type 33 upstream regulatory elements can control gene expression in human cervical keratinocytes
Lauricella-Lefèbvre, M. A.; Rentier, Bernard ULg; Piette, Jacques ULg

in Archives Internationales de Physiologie, de Biochimie et de Biophysique (1992), 100

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See detailHuman papillomavirus type-specific 18-month risk of high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia in women with a normal or borderline/mildly dyskaryotic smear.
Berkhof, Johannes; Bulkmans, Nicole W. J.; Bleeker, Maaike C. G. et al

in Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology (2006), 15(7), 1268-73

INTRODUCTION: High-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV) DNA testing is an increasingly used instrument in cervical cancer prevention along cervical cytology. The inclusion of hrHPV testing in cervical ... [more ▼]

INTRODUCTION: High-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV) DNA testing is an increasingly used instrument in cervical cancer prevention along cervical cytology. The inclusion of hrHPV testing in cervical screening requires efficient management as many hrHPV infections are transient. We investigated the potential value of hrHPV genotyping in normal and borderline/mildly dyskaryotic (BMD) smears. MATERIALS AND METHODS: From a screening population of 44,102 women in the Netherlands, we included hrHPV-positive women with a normal or BMD smear. We assessed the type-specific 18-month risk of high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). RESULTS: In hrHPV-positive women, 18-month risk of CIN grade 3 or invasive cancer (> or =CIN3) was 6% [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 4-9] after normal cytology and 20% (95% CI, 16-25) after BMD. If positive for HPV16, > or =CIN3 risks were 14% (95% CI, 9-21) and 37% (95% CI, 28-48), respectively. In the subset of hrHPV-positive women without HPV16, HPV18 was associated with an increased risk of high-grade CIN after normal cytology and HPV31 and HPV33 were associated with an increased risk, particularly after BMD. HPV16 and HPV18 were also associated with an increased risk of high-grade CIN in women with an hrHPV-positive normal baseline smear and a repeat normal smear at 6 months. DISCUSSION: HrHPV-positive women without type 16, 18, 31, or 33 had a relatively low risk of high-grade CIN. Among women with baseline normal cytology and among women with a baseline and repeat normal smear, HPV16/18-positive women showed an increased risk of high-grade CIN. This warrants more aggressive management of HPV16/18-positive women compared with other hrHPV-positive women. [less ▲]

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See detailHuman Papillomavirus Virus-Like particles and NK cell interactions:role of CD16
Renoux, Virginie ULg; Langers Inge; Clémenceau Béatrice et al

in International Immunology (2010), 22(suppl Pt 5), 17

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See detailHuman papillomavirus, lichen sclerosus and penile cancer: A study in Belgium.
D'Hauwers, K. W. M.; Depuydt, C. E.; Bogers, J. J. et al

in Vaccine (2012), 30(46), 6573-7

PURPOSE: The prevalence of penile cancer varies between 1.5 (industrialized countries) and 4.5 per 100,000 men (non-industrialized countries). Predominant histological subtype is squamous cell carcinoma ... [more ▼]

PURPOSE: The prevalence of penile cancer varies between 1.5 (industrialized countries) and 4.5 per 100,000 men (non-industrialized countries). Predominant histological subtype is squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Human papillomavirus (HPV) is found in 40-46% of cases: penile cancer is considered to behave as vulvar cancer. Non HPV related risk factors are lack of circumcision, phimosis, chronic inflammation, and smoking. The role of lichen sclerosus (LS) is unclear. Clinical diagnosis is difficult and treatment often mutilating. Preventive measures can be taken since the risk factors are known: the use of the prophylactic HPV vaccines may contribute. We measured the prevalence of HPV and LS in penile cancer in Belgium. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We found 76 samples of penile lesions in the archives of the departments of Histology of four university hospitals in Belgium. Real-time PCR of type-specific HPV DNA was performed targeting 18 HPV types. PRINCIPAL RESULTS: Patients with penile intraepithelial neoplasia (PeIN) were 56.1 years of age: patients with invasive penile cancer (IPC) 68.5 (p=0.009). Fifty-five samples (55/76) were adequate for HPV targeting. Overall HPV DNA was 70.9%: 89.5% in samples of PeIN (n=19) and 61.1% in samples of IPC (n=36). Invasive penile cancer samples were less likely to be HPV infected (p=0.028). HPV 16 was most prevalent: 48.3%: 20% PeIN, and 28.3% IPC. HPV DNA of the types, included in the prophylactic vaccines, was found in 33% of PeIN and 31.7% of IPC samples. Thrice, low risk HPV (lrHPV) types 6 (1 IPC) and 11 (1 PeIN, 1 IPC) were solely present. There was no difference in the presence of LS between HPV positive and HPV negative samples (p=0.944). CONCLUSIONS: Prevalence of HPV DNA in penile lesions in Belgium is high. However, the prophylactic vaccines may contribute to primary prevention of only a subset of cases. The role of LS remains unclear. [less ▲]

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See detailHuman Papillomavirus-related tumours of the oropharynx display a lower tumour hypoxia signature
Hanns, Elodie; Job, Sylvie; Coliat, Pierre et al

in Oral Oncology (2015), 51

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See detailThe human PDZome: a gateway to PDZ mediated functions.
Belotti, Edwige; Polanowska, Jolanta; Daulat, Avais M. et al

in Molecular & Cellular Proteomics (2013), 12(9), 25872603

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See detailThe Human Placenta Becomes Haemochorial at the 13th Week of Pregnancy
Foidart, Jean-Michel ULg; Hustin, Jean-Michel; Dubois, Michel ULg et al

in International Journal of Developmental Biology (1992), 36(3), 451-3

Histological specimens of recent implantation sites are the basis of our current concept on human embryo implantation and placental development. In the Carnegie Collection maternal red blood cells were ... [more ▼]

Histological specimens of recent implantation sites are the basis of our current concept on human embryo implantation and placental development. In the Carnegie Collection maternal red blood cells were detected early in the primitive intervillous space (10th-12th day after conception). These cells were localized to the trophoblastic lacunae and originated from distended peripheral maternal sinusoids (Kaufmann, 1981). The classical theory states that progressively more and more maternal vessels are tapped. A true maternal blood flow is established around the 29th day. Dynamic investigations of human placental development in vivo are scarce and hampered by ethical considerations and the absolute requirement to refrain from using non aggressive and potentially harmful techniques. Despite these limitations such studies provide new insights that surprisingly contradict our previously and seemingly definitely established knowledge of the early phases of placental vascularization, and lead us to conclude that there is an absence of maternal blood circulation in the intervillous placental space (IVS) during the 12 first weeks of human pregnancy. [less ▲]

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See detailHuman placental GH is found neither in amniotic fluid and fetal serum nor in pituitary GH-secreting adenoma.
Frankenne, d; Beckers, Albert ULg; El Khayat, N. et al

Conference (1987)

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See detailHuman placental growth hormone
Frankenne, Francis; Evain-Brion, Danielle; Alsat, Eliane et al

in Anales Espanoles de Pediatria (1992), 36(50), 77-80

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See detailHuman placental growth hormone: proof of identity with the GH-V gene product by N-terminal microsequence analysis.
Scippo, Marie-Louise ULg; Frankenne, F.; Van Beumen, J. et al

in Archives Internationales de Physiologie et de Biochimie (1989), 97

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See detailHuman platelet glycoprotein VI function is antagonized by monoclonal antibody-derived Fab fragments.
Lecut, Christelle ULg; Feeney, L. A.; Kingsbury, G. et al

in Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis [=JTH] (2003), 1(12), 2653-62

Platelet interactions with adhesive ligands exposed at sites of vascular injury initiate the normal hemostatic response but may also lead to arterial thrombosis. Platelet membrane glycoprotein (GP)VI is a ... [more ▼]

Platelet interactions with adhesive ligands exposed at sites of vascular injury initiate the normal hemostatic response but may also lead to arterial thrombosis. Platelet membrane glycoprotein (GP)VI is a key receptor for collagen. Impairment of GPVI function in mice results in a long-term antithrombotic protection and prevents neointimal hyperplasia following arterial injury. On the other hand, GPVI deficiency in humans or mice does not result in serious bleeding tendencies. Blocking GPVI function may thus represent a new and safe antithrombotic approach, but no specific, potent anti-GPVI directed at the human receptor is yet available. Our aim was to produce accessible antagonists of human GPVI to evaluate the consequences of GPVI blockade. Amongst several monoclonal antibodies to the extracellular domain of human GPVI, one, 9O12.2, was selected for its capacity to disrupt the interaction of GPVI with collagen in a purified system and to prevent the adhesion of cells expressing recombinant GPVI to collagen and collagen-related peptides (CRP). While 9O12.2 IgGs induced platelet activation by a mechanism involving GPVI and Fc gamma RIIA, 9O12.2 Fab fragments completely blocked collagen-induced platelet aggregation and secretion from 5 microg mL-1 and fully prevented CRP-induced activation from 1.5 microg mL-1. 9O12.2 Fabs also inhibited the procoagulant activity of collagen-stimulated platelets and platelet adhesion to collagen in static conditions. Furthermore, 9O12.2 Fabs impaired platelet adhesion, and prevented thrombi formation under arterial flow conditions. We thus describe here for the first time a functional monoclonal antibody to human GPVI and demonstrate its effect on collagen-induced platelet aggregation and procoagulant activity, and on thrombus growth. [less ▲]

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See detailHuman presence at Belle-Roche, in the Ardenne massif (western Europe) : Terrestrial Cosmogenic Nuclides (10Be) dating of fluvial sediments confirms an age of ∼580 ka
Rixhon, Gilles; Braucher, Régis; Bourlès, Didier et al

in Geophysical Research Abstracts (2011), 13

Detailed reference viewed: 11 (1 ULg)