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See detailGrowth performance of crossbred (Brahman x (Vietnam Yellow xSindhi)) cattle raising in the Red river delta
Nguyen Van Duy, ULiege; Vu Dinh, Ton

in Journal of Animal Husbandry Sciences and Technics (2013), 6(171), 61-68

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See detailGrowth performances, carcass and organs characteristics and economics results of growing indigenous senegal chickens fed diets containing various levels of leuceana leucocephala (Lam.) leaves meal (2011)
Ayssiwede, Simplice; Chrysostome, C.A.A.M.; Zanmenou, J.C. et al

in International Journal of Poultry Sciences (2011), 10(9), 1132-1145

The aim of this study carried out from September to December 2010 was to evaluate the effects of Leuceana leucocephala leaves meal inclusion in the diets on growth performances, carcass and organs ... [more ▼]

The aim of this study carried out from September to December 2010 was to evaluate the effects of Leuceana leucocephala leaves meal inclusion in the diets on growth performances, carcass and organs characteristics and economics results of growing indigenous Senegal chickens. One hundred and four (104) indigenous Senegal chicks of 4 weeks old were randomly allocated into four groups of 26 chicks each with similar body weight. Each group subdivided in two repetitions of 13 birds, corresponded to each of the four (4) dietary treatments LL0, LL7, LL14 and LL21 containing respectively 0, 7, 14 and 21% of Leuceana leaves meal in substitution of groundnut cake meal. During the experiment (5-17th week old), zootechnical parameters of birds and economical data were recorded and analyzed per dietary treatment. At the end of the 13 weeks trial, the final Live Body Weights (LBW) were 864 g, 1166.48 g, 905 g and 887.16 g/bird, the Average Daily Weight Gain (ADWG) were 7.77 g, 10.88 g, 8.15 g and 8.10 g/day, the Daily Feed Intake (DFI) of 39.86 g, 51 g, 40.39 g and 44.75 g/bird and the Feed Conversion Ratio (FCR) of 7.04, 5.54, 6.27 and 6.80 respectively for birds fed LL0, LL7, LL14 and LL21 diets. The Leuceana leaves meal inclusion in the diets up to 21% had not caused any adverse effect on LBW, ADWG, DFI, FCR, mortality, carcass and organs characteristics in birds compared to their controls. Apart from the dark yellowing of abdominal fat of carcasses from birds fed LL21 diet, significantly better growth performances, feed costs and economic margins were recorded in birds fed LL7 and LL14 diets. Thus, these two dietary treatments were the only most economically profitable (respectively 214 and 48 FCFA/kg carcass of additional profit) compared to the control. [less ▲]

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See detailGrowth promotion in broilers by both oxytetracycline and Macleaya cordata extract is based on their anti-inflammatory properties
Khadem, A.; Soler, L.; Everaert, Nadia ULiege et al

in British Journal of Nutrition (2014)

The non-antibiotic anti-inflammatory theory of antimicrobial growth promoters (AGP) predicts that alternatives can be selected by simple in vitro tests. In vitro, the known AGP oxytetracycline (OTC) and a ... [more ▼]

The non-antibiotic anti-inflammatory theory of antimicrobial growth promoters (AGP) predicts that alternatives can be selected by simple in vitro tests. In vitro, the known AGP oxytetracycline (OTC) and a Macleaya cordata extract (MCE) had an anti-inflammatory effect with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration of 88 and 132 mg/l, respectively. In vivo, chickens received three different concentrations of MCE in drinking-water, OTC in feed and a control. Body weight (BW), feed intake (FI) and gain:feed (G:F) ratio were determined on days 14, 21 and 35. On day 35, body composition was determined. Plasma α1-acid glycoprotein (α1-AG) concentration was measured on days 21 and 35, and the expression of several jejunal inflammatory genes was determined on day 35. OTC-fed chickens showed a significantly higher BW, FI and G:F ratio compared with the control group at all time points. MCE had a significant linear effect on BW on days 21 and 35, and the G:F ratio was improved only over the whole period, whereas FI was not different. Only MCE but not OTC decreased the percentage of abdominal fat. Plasma α1-AG concentration increased from day 21 to 35, with the values being lower in the treatment groups. Both OTC and MCE significantly reduced the jejunal mucosal expression of inducible NO synthase. For most parameters measured, there was a clear linear dose-response to treatment with MCE. In conclusion, the results are consistent with the anti-inflammatory theory of growth promotion in production animals. Copyright © The Authors 2014. [less ▲]

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See detailGrowth rate of bumblebee larvae is related to pollen amino acids
Moerman, R.; Vanderplanck, Maryse ULiege; Roger, N. et al

in Journal of Economic Entomology (2016), 109(1), 25-30

The use of Bombus terrestris L. commercial colonies for outdoor and greenhouse crop pollination is currently widespread. Colony breeding includes bumblebee feeding, mostly by using the honeybee pollen ... [more ▼]

The use of Bombus terrestris L. commercial colonies for outdoor and greenhouse crop pollination is currently widespread. Colony breeding includes bumblebee feeding, mostly by using the honeybee pollen loads of diverse palynological composition. Because the chemical content of pollen is highly variable, the choice of commercial blend should not be random but has to be carefully selected to ensure the optimal development of workers and then pollination efficacy. In this work, we compared the impact of three common commercial blends on the development of bumblebee microcolonies, namely, Actinidia deliciosa L., Cistus sp., and Salix sp. We focus on amino acids (i.e., composition and amount), as they are currently used as an indicator of diet performance. Five parameters were used to determine microcolonies growth rate: 1) number of eggs, 2) number of alive larvae, 3) number of ejected larvae, 4) number of pupae, and 5) total number of offspring. Syrup collection was also monitored to estimate energetic requirement for colony growth. Results revealed that the three commercial blends chemically differed in their amino acid contents, with those displaying higher concentrations (i.e., Salix sp. and A. deliciosa) accelerating microcolony development along with an increase of syrup collection. The advantages of rearing bumblebee commercial colonies using a pollen diet with an optimal amino acid content are discussed. © The Authors 2015. [less ▲]

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See detailGrowth rate, carcass performance and meat quality of Ban pigs and crossbred F1(Mong Cai x Ban) pig raised in Hoa Binh province
Nguyen Van Duy, ULiege; Vu Dinh, Ton

in Journal of Sciences and Development (2012), 10(7), 1000-1007

The study was carried out in Doc Lap commune, Ky Son district, Hoa Binh province from 2010 to 2011. The aim of the study was to compare the growth rate, carcass performance and meat quality between ... [more ▼]

The study was carried out in Doc Lap commune, Ky Son district, Hoa Binh province from 2010 to 2011. The aim of the study was to compare the growth rate, carcass performance and meat quality between fattening pigs of local breed (called Ban pig) and F1 crossbred pig (Mong Cai boar × Ban sow). The results showed that over the same period of age, the growth rate of both F1 (MC × B) crossbred and Ban pig were considerably low, and the average daily gain (ADG) of the crossbred (125.30 g) was remakably higher than Ban pig (65.50 g) (P<0.05). Other indicators of meat quality such as percentage of water loss, pH45, pH24 and colour of meat were within normal range of pork. It was clearly shown that using Mong Cai boar crossbred with Ban sow has improved the growth rate and carcass performance of fattening pigs. The crossing formula (Mong Cai boar × Ban sow) was recommended for popular adoption in mountainous areas of Hoa Binh province, where most of Muong communities reside. [less ▲]

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See detailGrowth Regulation of Astrocytes and C6 Cells by Tgfbeta1: Correlation with Gap Junctions
Robe, Pierre ULiege; Rogister, Bernard ULiege; Merville, Marie-Paule ULiege et al

in Neuroreport (2000), 11(13), 2837-41

Transforming growth factor (TGF) beta1 enhanced in vitro [3H]thymidine incorporation into C6 cells and reduced that of astrocytes in the presence of a high serum concentration. It concomitantly raised the ... [more ▼]

Transforming growth factor (TGF) beta1 enhanced in vitro [3H]thymidine incorporation into C6 cells and reduced that of astrocytes in the presence of a high serum concentration. It concomitantly raised the gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) in normal astrocytes but reduced the coupling of C6 cells, and respectively increased or decreased the proportion of P2-phosphorylated connexin (Cx) 43 isoform in these cells. Finally, octanol, which inhibited GJIC in both cell types, increased the thymidine incorporation in C6 cells, but neither altered the proliferation of astrocytes nor their response to TGFbeta1. These data indicate that an inhibition of gap junction intercellular communication, due to an altered phosphorylation of connexin 43, may contribute to the proliferative response of C6 glioblastoma cells to TGFbeta1. [less ▲]

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See detailGrowth tests on media containing drugs
Vandenbol, Micheline ULiege; Portetelle, Daniel ULiege; Hilger, François

Poster (1997)

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See detailGrowth tests on media containing drugs
Vandenbol, Micheline ULiege; Portetelle, Daniel ULiege; Hilger, F.

in Second Eurofan Meeting (1997)

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See detailGrowth velocity of preterm infants - analysis and recommendations
Fenton, Tanis; Hoyaos, Angela; Groh-Wargo, Sharon et al

Conference (2017)

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See detailGrowth velocity of preterm infants - analysis and recommendations
Fenton, Tanis; Hoyos, Angela; Groh-Wargo, Sharon et al

Conference (2017)

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See detailGrowth, body development and reproduction in Belgian Blue cattle as influenced by management
Evrard, Pierre; de Behr, Vanessa; Raskin, Pascale et al

in Book of abstracts of the 49th annual meeting of the European Association for Animal Production (1998)

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See detailGrowth, development and metabolic programming in premature infants
SENTERRE, Thibault ULiege

in 8th International Neonatal Conference (2013, February)

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See detailGrowth, fluorescence, photosynthetic O-2 production and pigment content of salt adapted cultures of Arthrospira (Spirulina) platensis
Ben Dhiab, R.; Ben Ouada, H.; Boussetta, H. et al

in Journal of Applied Phycology (2007), 19(4), 293-301

The effect of salt concentration (NaCl) on growth, fluorescence, photosynthetic activities and pigment content of the cyanobacterium Arthrospira platensis has been investigated over 15 days. It has been ... [more ▼]

The effect of salt concentration (NaCl) on growth, fluorescence, photosynthetic activities and pigment content of the cyanobacterium Arthrospira platensis has been investigated over 15 days. It has been observed that high NaCl concentration induces an increase of the growth, photosynthetic efficiency (alpha), phycobilin/chlorophyll ratio and a slight decrease of dark respiration and compensation points. Moreover, high NaCl concentration enhances photosystem II (PSII) activity compared to photosystem I (PSI). Results show that the phycobilin-PSII energy transfer compared to the chlorophyll-PSII (F-695,F-600/F-695,F-440) increases. However, data obtained about the maximal efficiency of PSII photochemistry are controversial. Indeed, the Fv/Fm ratio decreases in salt adapted cultures, while at the same time the trapping flux per PSII reaction center (TR0/RC) and the probability of electron transport beyond QA (Psi(0)) remain unchanged at the level of the donor and the acceptor sites of PSII. This effect can be attributed to the interference of phycobilin fluorescence with Chl a when performing polyphasic transient measurements. [less ▲]

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See detailGrowth, milk and meat production with a Belgian Blue x Holstein F1 herd
Gielen, Marc ULiege; Dufrasne, Isabelle ULiege; Hollo, Véronique et al

in Proceedings of the 42nd Annual Meeting of E.A.A.P. (1991)

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See detailGrowth, size and age at maturity of the agile frog (Rana dalmatina) in an Iberian Peninsula population
Sarasola-Puente, V.; Gosá, A.; Oromi Farrús, Neus ULiege et al

in Zoology (2011), 114

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See detailGrowth-hormone binding protein (GHBP) binds prolactin in cattle plasma
Massart, Serge; Ban, Anne-Marie; Renaville, Robert ULiege et al

Conference (1995)

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See detailGrowth-induced haemodynamic changes in healthy Friesian calves
Amory, Hélène ULiege; Desmecht, Daniel ULiege; Linden, Annick ULiege et al

in Veterinary Record : Journal of the British Veterinary Association (1993), 132(17), 426-434

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See detailGrowth-inhibiting effects of a neem-based insecticide (Margosan-O) against Spodoptera littoralis (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae
Haubruge, Eric ULiege; Seck, Dogo; Hemptinne, Jean-Louis et al

in Insect Science and its application (1994), 15(4), 243-249

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See detailGrowth-modulating molecules are associated with invading Schwann cells and not astrocytes in human traumatic spinal cord injury
Buss, A.; Pech, K.; Kakulas, B. A. et al

in Brain (2007), 130(Part 4), 940-953

Despite considerable progress in recent years, the underlying mechanisms responsible for the failure of axonal regeneration after spinal cord injury (SCI) remain only partially understood. Experimental ... [more ▼]

Despite considerable progress in recent years, the underlying mechanisms responsible for the failure of axonal regeneration after spinal cord injury (SCI) remain only partially understood. Experimental data have demonstrated that a major impediment to the outgrowth of severed axons is the scar tissue that finally dominates the lesion site and, in severe injuries, is comprised of connective tissue and fluid-filled cysts, surrounded by a dense astroglial scar. Reactive astrocytes and infiltrating cells, such as fibroblasts, produce a dense extracellular matrix (ECM) that represents a physical and molecular barrier to axon regeneration. In the human situation, correlative data on the molecular composition of the scar tissue that forms following traumatic SCI is scarce. A detailed investigation on the expression of putative growth-inhibitory and growth-promoting molecules was therefore performed in samples of post-mortem human spinal cord, taken from patients who died following severe traumatic SCI. The lesion-induced scar could be subdivided into a Schwann cell dominated domain which contained large neuromas and a surrounding dense ECM, and a well delineated astroglial scar that isolated the Schwann cell/ECM rich territories from the intact spinal parenchyma. The axon growth-modulating molecules collagen IV, laminin and fibronectin were all present in the post-traumatic scar tissue. These molecules were almost exclusively found in the Schwann cell-rich domain which had an apparent growth-promoting effect on PNS axons. In the astrocytic domain, these molecules were restricted to blood vessel walls without a co-localization with the few regenerating CNS neurites located in this region. Taken together, these results favour the notion that it is the astroglial compartment that plays a dominant role in preventing CNS axon regeneration. The failure to demonstrate any collagen IV, laminin or fibronectin upregulation associated with the astroglial scar suggests that other molecules may play a more significant role in preventing axon regeneration following human SCI. [less ▲]

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See detailGrowth-Related Changes in the Pulmonary Function of Goats
Bakima, M.; Lomba, Fernand; Lekeux, Pierre ULiege

in Veterinary Research Communications (1990), 14(2), 141-146

Growth-related changes in pulmonary function values were investigated in 20 healthy French Alpine goats, aged between 20 and 550 days, weighing 7-55 kg. Pulmonary ventilation, mechanics of breathing and ... [more ▼]

Growth-related changes in pulmonary function values were investigated in 20 healthy French Alpine goats, aged between 20 and 550 days, weighing 7-55 kg. Pulmonary ventilation, mechanics of breathing and arterial oxygen tension were measured using standardized techniques and methods adapted for goats of different body sizes. The Ppl values and the tI/tTOT ratio showed no significant changes with age and body size. The ventilation values (Vt, Ve, mVI and mVE) increased linearly with growth. There was a significant correlation of age and body weight with dynamic lung compliance (Cdyn), total pulmonary resistance (RL), viscous work of breathing (Wvis tot) and minute viscous work (Wvis min) throughout the age range studied. Cdyn, Wvis tot and Wvis min increased and RL decreased with age and body weight. Arterial blood gases (PaO2 and PaCO2) did not show significant changes over the age range studied. Regression equations for each pulmonary function parameter are given with body weight as the independent variable. Data for the mechanics of breathing were compared with those elsewhere for cattle, horses, man and dogs. [less ▲]

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