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See detailMANAGING PUBLIC ORDER DURING
Schoenaers, Frédéric ULg; Vincent, Jeffrey; Easton, Marleen et al

Conference (2012, September)

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See detailManaging Research at the University
Grandjean, Geoffrey ULg

Scientific conference (2011, September 28)

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See detailManaging the osteoporotic patient today
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg

in BONE (2007), 40(5, Suppl. 1), 12-18

as reduced pain and disability. The unique mechanism of action of strontium ranelate corrects bone turnover so that it is rebalanced in favor of bone formation. Double-blind, placebo-controlled studies in ... [more ▼]

as reduced pain and disability. The unique mechanism of action of strontium ranelate corrects bone turnover so that it is rebalanced in favor of bone formation. Double-blind, placebo-controlled studies in postmenopausal osteoporosis show it to be effective in reducing vertebral and hip fracture risks. Treatment efficacy has been documented across a wide range of patient profiles and appears to be independent of all the major determinants of fracture risk, including the severity of the disease at baseline, the number of prevalent fractures, and the age of the patient. This antifracture efficacy translates into clinical benefits, including a reduction in the rate of height loss and an increase in the number of patients free of back pain. Strontium ranelate is also one of the few anti osteoporotic drugs with data to demonstrate an improvement in quality of life indices. The rates of compliance with treatment were over 80% in phase 3 studies, reflecting the tolerability and safety profile and the ease of administration of this agent. Strontium ranelate thus offers significant clinical benefits in terms of efficacy, tolerability, and ease of administration in the treatment of postmenopausal women with osteoporosis fractures. (c) 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailManaging understory light to maintain a mixture of species with different shade tolerance
Ligot, Gauthier ULg; Balandier, Philippe; Courbaud, Benoît et al

in Forest Ecology & Management (2014)

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See detailManaging understory light to maintain the coexistence of forest tree species with different shade tolerances
Ligot, Gauthier ULg

Doctoral thesis (2014)

Similar to the management of the other environmental resources, forest management has been questioned and more sustainable practices of forest management are being sought. New close-to-nature practices ... [more ▼]

Similar to the management of the other environmental resources, forest management has been questioned and more sustainable practices of forest management are being sought. New close-to-nature practices aim to favor natural processes over human interventions. Particularly, continuous-cover forestry has the goal of relying on natural regeneration, and maintaining irregular stand structure and tree species mixture. However, maintaining mixture of species with different shade tolerances appears arduous with such a silvicultural system. Successfully managing irregular and mixed forests, relying on natural processes, requires a strong knowledge of the ecology of natural regeneration. In particular, strong knowledge is required to predict the result of the interspecific competition in the understory depending upon light availability. The amount of radiation transmitted to the understory is indeed a critical factor determining regeneration dynamics. It determines, at least in part, regeneration composition because of interspecific differences of growth and survival under shade. Moreover, our quantitative understanding of understory light in uneven-aged and mixed stands remains incomplete. A better quantitative understanding of understory light is needed to provide quantitative guidelines for the management of understory light in uneven-aged and mixed stands and, hence, for the management of natural regeneration. The purpose of this thesis is to determine how close-to-nature forest management can maintain mixtures of species with contrasting shade tolerances. I consider ecological conditions with good water and nutrient supplies. In these conditions, partially closed canopy limits the amount of light that reaches the understory, and light is the major factor driving regeneration composition. Consequently, I study the dynamics of natural regeneration with regards to light availability as well as the interception of light by the canopy of heterogeneous stands. Studying the regeneration ecology of two species with contrasting shade tolerances (Fagus sylvatica L. and Quercus petraea (Matt.) Liebl.), I find that the shade-tolerant species outgrow the less shade-tolerant species in all light conditions. Even though the control of understory light with continuous-cover silviculture is required to sustain the growth of less shade-tolerant regenerations, it might not be sufficient to maintain the coexistence of species with contrasting shade tolerances. In order to examine the effects of canopy structure and composition on understory light availability, I use a model of light interception by heterogeneous canopies after synthesizing and discussing the approaches reported in the literature. The model predicts satisfactorily measures of transmitted light even though it is a relatively simple radiative transfer model. I next explore how various silvicultural treatments can be manipulated to provide favorable understory light conditions for natural regeneration. These silvicultural strategies correspond to selective thinnings of five different types, e.g., harvesting preferentially small trees, large trees, or trees of shade-tolerant species or creating circular gaps. The results underline that creating favorable understory light conditions for natural regeneration can be achieved with various regeneration treatments. However, the adequate reduction of stand density depends upon the chosen silvicultural strategies. In particular, creating gaps of about 500 m2 provides adequate light for small regeneration clumps. Harvesting preferentially small and trees of shade-tolerant species are also appropriate but required higher harvest intensity. Harvesting preferentially large trees slightly increases understory light and promotes more shade-tolerant species than less shade-tolerant species. In order to maintain the coexistence of species with contrasting shade tolerances, forest manager must control understory light and manually suppress the regeneration of the shade-tolerant species. The outcome of this study provides foresters with the necessary tools to evaluate how silvicultural treatments can be manipulated to create or maintain favorable light conditions for the regeneration of species of different shade tolerances. Guidelines are additionally proposed for forest managers wanting to maintain the coexistence of species with contrasting shade tolerances. [less ▲]

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See detailLe mandat apparent des conseils techniques des assureurs, note sous Liège, 29 mars 2010
Kohl, Benoît ULg; Salzburger, Romain ULg

Book published by Confédération Nationale de la Construction (2012)

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See detailLe mandat d'arrêt européen : remise en cause du mécanisme de simple remise.
Monville, Pierre ULg

in Journal des Tribunaux Droit Européen (2003)

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See detailMandat d’arrêt européen et remise des nationaux
Flore, Daniel ULg

in European Arrest Warrant (2005)

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See detailLe mandat d'arrêt européen
Thevissen, Patrick ULg

Conference (2011, January 14)

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See detailLe mandat. Pratique judiciaire et notariale
Kohl, Benoît ULg

Book published by Larcier (2014)

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See detailMandements épiscopaux et dispositif cérémoniel liégeois (XVIIe-XVIIIe siècle)
Delfosse, Annick ULg

in Bulletin de la Société d'Art et d'Histoire du Diocèse de Liège (2011), LXIX

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See detailMandible Behavior in Obstructive Sleep Apnea Patients Under CPAP Treatment
Senny, Frédéric ULg; Maury, Gisèle; CAMBRON, Laurent ULg et al

in Open Sleep Journal (2012), 5

Aim: To investigate whether obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients present different behaviors of mandible movements before and under CPAP therapy. Materials and Methodology: In this retrospective study ... [more ▼]

Aim: To investigate whether obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients present different behaviors of mandible movements before and under CPAP therapy. Materials and Methodology: In this retrospective study, patients were selected according to inclusion criteria: both the diagnostic polysomnography recording showing an OSA with an apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) greater than 25 (n/h) and the related CPAP therapy control recordings were available, presence of mandible movement and mask pressure signals in the recordings, and tolerance to the applied positive pressure. Statistical analysis on four parameters, namely the apneahypopnea index (AHI), the arousal index (ArI), the average of the mandible lowering during sleep (aLOW), and the average amplitude of the oscillations of the mandible movement signal (aAMPL), was performed on two sets of recordings: OSA and CPAP therapy. Results: Thirty-four patients satisfied the inclusion criteria, thus both OSA and CPAP groups included thirty-four recordings each. Significant difference (p < 0.001) was found in the OSA group compared with the CPAP group when considering either the four parameters or only the two ones related to mandible movements. Conclusions: When an efficient CPAP pressure is applied, the mouth is less open and presents fewer broad sharp closure movements, and oscillating mandible movements are absent or very small. [less ▲]

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See detailMandibles and molars of the wood mouse, Apodemus sylvaticus (L.): integrated latitudinal pattern and mosaic insular evolution
Renaud, Sabrina; Michaux, Johan ULg

in Journal of Biogeography (2007), 34(2), 339-355

Aim The distinct nature of island populations has traditionally been attributed either to adaptation to particular insular conditions or to random genetic effects. In order to assess the relative ... [more ▼]

Aim The distinct nature of island populations has traditionally been attributed either to adaptation to particular insular conditions or to random genetic effects. In order to assess the relative importance of these two disparate processes, insular effects were addressed in the European wood mouse, Apodemus sylvaticus (Linnaeus, 1758). Location Wood mice from 33 localities on both mainland and various Atlantic and western Mediterranean islands were considered. This sampling covers only part of the latitudinal range of A. sylvaticus but included the two main genetic clades identified by previous studies. Islands encompass a range of geographical conditions (e.g. small islands fringing the continent through large and isolated ones). Methods The insular syndrome primarily invokes variations in body size, but ecological factors such as release from competition, niche widening and food availability should also influence other characters related to diet. In the present study, the morphology of the wood mice was quantified based on two characters involved in feeding: the size and shape of the mandibles and first upper molars. The size of the mandible is also a proxy for the body size of the animal. Patterns of morphological differentiation of both features were estimated using twodimensional outline analysis based on Fourier methods. Results Significant differences between mainland and island populations were observed in most cases for both the mandibles and molars. However, molars and mandibles displayed divergent patterns. Mandible shape diverged mostly on islands of intermediate remoteness and competition levels, whereas molars exhibited the greatest shape differentiation on small islands, such as Port-Cros and Porquerolles. A mosaic pattern was also displayed for size. Body and mandible size increased on Ibiza, but molar size remained similar to mainland populations. Mosaic patterns were, however, not apparent in the mainland populations. Congruent latitudinal variations were evident for the size and shape of both mandibles and molars. Main conclusions Mosaic evolution appears to characterize insular divergence. The molar seems to be more prone to change with reduced population size on small islands, whereas the mandible could be more sensitive to peculiar environmental conditions on large and remote islands. [less ▲]

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See detailMandibular osteodistraction as a corrective method for class II malocclusions in the horse.
Verwilghen, Denis; Van Galen, Gaby; Busoni, Valeria ULg et al

Poster (2008, July)

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See detailMandibular osteodistraction for correction of deep bite class II malocclusion in a horse
Verwilghen, Denis ULg; Van Galen, Gaby ULg; Vander Heyden, Laurent ULg et al

in Veterinary Surgery : The Official Journal of the American College of Veterinary Surgeons (2008), 37(6), 571-579

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See detailMandibule édentée.: critères de choix d'une réhabilitation prothétique implantaire.
Lamy, Marc ULg

in Information Dentaire (L') (2010)

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See detailLa mandragore dans la thérapeutique durant l’Antiquité gréco-romaine
Nissen, Cécile ULg

in New Yperman (2004), 5

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See detailLe Manet de Bourdieu
Saint-Amand, Denis ULg

in Acta Fabula : Revue des Parutions en Théorie Littéraire (2014)

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