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Peer Reviewed
See detailLarge-scale synthesis and shaping of xerogel catalysts
Alié, Christelle ULg; Ferauche, Fabrice; Tcherkassova, Natalia et al

Poster (2006)

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See detailLarge-scale synthesis of multi-walled carbon nanotubes in a continuous inclined mobile-bed rotating reactor by the catalytic chemical vapour deposition process using methane as carbon source
Douven, Sigrid ULg; Pirard, Sophie ULg; Chan, Fang-Yue et al

in Chemical Engineering Journal (2012)

Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were produced in a continuous inclined mobile-bed rotating reactor by the catalytic chemical vapour deposition of methane on a bimetallic Ni-Mo/MgO catalyst whose ... [more ▼]

Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were produced in a continuous inclined mobile-bed rotating reactor by the catalytic chemical vapour deposition of methane on a bimetallic Ni-Mo/MgO catalyst whose activity remains constant in the course of time. Measurements performed on the continuous reactor were validated to ensure that the installation worked correctly and that measurements were precise enough. The performance of the reactor was simulated using a model based on the chemical reactor engineering approach. Hypotheses of the model were verified, and a kinetic study was performed to obtain a kinetic rate expression and to determine the catalytic activity as a function of time. The purity level of produced CNTs depends on the desired properties of the product, so the operating conditions are linked to the purity level that is required. A minimal purity level corresponds to high carbon production, and a maximal purity level corresponds to high specific productivity. It was shown that operating conditions had to be fixed to reach a given specific productivity or a given carbon production, and the optimized operating conditions leading to those two opposite purity level objectives were established. [less ▲]

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See detailLarge-scale wind structures in OB supergiants: a search for rotationally modulated Halpha variability
Morel, Thierry ULg; Marchenko, S. V.; Pati, A. K. et al

in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (2004), 351

We present the results of a long-term monitoring campaign of the Hα line in a sample of bright OB supergiants (O7.5-B9) which aims at detecting rotationally modulated changes potentially related to the ... [more ▼]

We present the results of a long-term monitoring campaign of the Hα line in a sample of bright OB supergiants (O7.5-B9) which aims at detecting rotationally modulated changes potentially related to the existence of large-scale wind structures. A total of 22 objects were monitored during 36 nights spread over six months in 2001-2002. Coordinated broad-band photometric observations were also obtained for some targets. Conspicuous evidence for variability in Hα is found for the stars displaying a feature contaminated by wind emission. Most changes take place on a daily time-scale, although hourly variations are also occasionally detected. Convincing evidence for a cyclical pattern of variability in Hα has been found in two stars: HD 14134 and HD 42087. Periodic signals are also detected in other stars, but independent confirmation is required. Rotational modulation is suggested from the similarity between the observed recurrence time-scales (in the range 13-25 d) and estimated periods of stellar rotation. We call attention to the atypical case of HD 14134, which exhibits a clear 12.8-d periodicity, both in the photometric and in the spectroscopic data sets. This places this object among a handful of early-type stars where one may observe a clear link between extended wind structures and photospheric disturbances. Further modelling may test the hypothesis that azimuthally-extended wind streams are responsible for the patterns of spectral variability in our target stars. [less ▲]

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See detailLarge-scale Wind Structures in OB Supergiants: a Search for Rotationally Modulated Halpha variability
Morel, Thierry ULg; Marchenko, S. V.; Pati, A. K. et al

in Bulletin of the Astronomical Society of India (2003), 31

We present preliminary results of a long-term spectroscopic monitoring of a sample of bright OB-supergiants aimed at establishing the incidence of co-rotating, large-scale wind structures by detecting ... [more ▼]

We present preliminary results of a long-term spectroscopic monitoring of a sample of bright OB-supergiants aimed at establishing the incidence of co-rotating, large-scale wind structures by detecting rotationally modulated variability in H. Dramatic line-profile variations operating on a daily (and in some cases on a hourly) timescale are observed. A detailed period analysis has been so far carried out for 2 stars, and revealed in both cases the existence of cyclical H variations consistent with rotational modulation. In the case of HD 14134, the same periodicity is found in the contemporaneous light curve. [less ▲]

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See detailLes larmes aux yeux. La phénoménologie embrumée
Steinmetz, Rudy ULg

in Voir (1994)

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See detailLarval development of Myzostoma cirriferum (Myzostomida)
Eeckhaut, I.; Fievez, Laurence ULg; Muller, M. C.

in Journal of Morphology (2003), 258

The larval development of Myzostoma cirriferum is described by means of SEM, TEM, and cLSM. It is similar to that of other myzostomids and includes three stages: the protrochophore, the trochophore, and ... [more ▼]

The larval development of Myzostoma cirriferum is described by means of SEM, TEM, and cLSM. It is similar to that of other myzostomids and includes three stages: the protrochophore, the trochophore, and the metatrochophore. The protrochophore is a ball-shaped larva present in culture from 18-48 h after egg laying. It has no internal organs and its body is made of three cell types: covering cells and ciliated cells that are external and surrounded by a cuticle, and resting cells that fill the blastocoel. The trochophore is a pear-shaped larva that develops 20-72 h after egg laying; the body includes the same three cell types as the previous stage. The metatrochophore is a pear-shaped larva that develops between 40 h and 14 days and is characterized by the presence of two bundles of four chaetae. When fully developed, the metatrochophore has a digestive system (made of a pharynx, an esophagus, and a blind digestive pouch), two pairs of protonephridia, and a nervous system composed of a supraesophageal ganglion, circumesophageal connectives, and dorsal and ventral nerves. Metamorphosis generally occurs 7 days after egg laying. At that time, the metatrochophore loses its chaetae and becomes pleated ventrally. This ultrastructural analysis suggests that chaetae and the five ventral longitudinal nerve cords of M. cirriferum metatrochophores are homologous structures to those observed in some polychaete trochophores. Coupled with recent phylogenetic analyses, where the Myzostomida are placed outside the Annelida, homologies between myzostomid and polychaete larvae support the view that a trochophore appeared early during the spiralian evolution [less ▲]

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See detailLarval development sites of the main Culicoides species (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) in northern Europe and distribution of coprophilic species larvae in Belgian pastures
Zimmer, Jean-Yves ULg; Brostaux, Yves ULg; Haubruge, Eric ULg et al

in Veterinary Parasitology (2014), 205(3-4), 676-686

Some Culicoides species of biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) are biological virus vectors worldwide and have indeed been associated with outbreaks of important epizoonoses in recent years, such as ... [more ▼]

Some Culicoides species of biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) are biological virus vectors worldwide and have indeed been associated with outbreaks of important epizoonoses in recent years, such as bluetongue and Schmallenberg disease in northern Europe. These diseases, which affect domestic and wild ruminants, have caused considerable economic losses. Knowledge of substrates suitable for Culicoides larval development is important, particularly for the main vector temperate species. This study, realized during two years, aimed to highlight the larval development sites of these biting midge species in the immediate surroundings of ten Belgian cattle farms. Moreover, spatial distribution of the coprophilic Culicoides larvae (C. chiopterus and C. dewulfi) within pastures was studied with increasing distance from farms along linear transects (farm–pasture–woodland). A total of 4347 adult specimens belonging to 13 Culicoides species were obtained by incubation of 2131 soil samples belonging to 102 different substrates; 18 of these substrates were suitable for larval development. The Obsoletus complex (formed by two species) was observed in a wide range of substrates, including silage residues, components of a chicken coop, dung adhering to walls inside stables, leftover feed along the feed bunk, a compost pile of sugar beet residues, soil of a livestock trampling area, and decaying wood, while the following served as substrates for the other specimens: C. chiopterus, mainly cow dung; C. dewulfi, cow dung and molehill soil; C. circumscriptus, algae; C. festivipennis, algae and soil in stagnant water; C. nubeculosus, algae and silt specifically from the edge of a pond; C. punctatus, mainly wet soil between silage reserves; C. salinarius, algae; and C. stigma, algae and wet soil between silage reserves. We also recorded significantly higher densities of coprophilic larvae within pastures in cow dung located near forests, which is likely due to the localization of potential hosts; the presence of these larvae within cow dung is, however, uninfluenced by relative distance from farms. A better knowledge of the microhabitats of Culicoides biting midges and their spatial distribution may allow the development of targeted species-specific vector control strategies, and may help to prevent the creation of new larval development sites. [less ▲]

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See detailLarval growth in polyphenic salamanders: making the best of a bad lot
Whiteman, Howard; Wissinger, Scott A.; Denoël, Mathieu ULg et al

in Oecologia (2012), 168(1), 109-118

Polyphenisms are excellent models for studying phenotypic variation, yet few studies have focused on natural populations. Facultative paedomorphosis is a polyphenism in which salamanders either ... [more ▼]

Polyphenisms are excellent models for studying phenotypic variation, yet few studies have focused on natural populations. Facultative paedomorphosis is a polyphenism in which salamanders either metamorphose or retain their larval morphology and eventually become paedomorphic. Paedomorphosis can result from selection for capitalizing on favorable aquatic habitats (paedomorph advantage), but could also be a default strategy under poor aquatic conditions (best of a bad lot). We tested these alternatives by quantifying how the developmental environment influences the ontogeny of wild Arizona tiger salamanders (Ambystoma tigrinum nebulosum). Most paedomorphs in our study population arose from slow-growing larvae that developed under high density and size-structured conditions (best of a bad lot), although a few faster-growing larvae also became paedomorphic (paedomorph advantage). Males were more likely to become paedomorphs than females and did so under a greater range of body sizes than females, signifying a critical role for gender in this polyphenism. Our results emphasize that the same phenotype can be adaptive under different environmental and genetic contexts and that studies of phenotypic variation should consider multiple mechanisms of morph production. [less ▲]

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See detailLarval rearing of African carp, Labeo parvus Boulenger, 1902 (Pisces: Cyprinidae), using live food and artificial diet under controlled conditions
Montchowui, Elie; Laleye, Philippe; N'tcha, Emile et al

in Aquaculture Research (2011)

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See detailLes larves de taupins sont attirées par différentes sources de volatils racinaires
Barsics, Fanny ULg; Latine, Rémi ULg; Haubruge, Eric ULg et al

Poster (2011, October 13)

Grâce à des tests olfactométriques, nous voulons mettre en évidence la capacité de certains COVs d’origine racinaire à attirer ou repousser les larves de taupins. Nous montrons ici les premiers résultats ... [more ▼]

Grâce à des tests olfactométriques, nous voulons mettre en évidence la capacité de certains COVs d’origine racinaire à attirer ou repousser les larves de taupins. Nous montrons ici les premiers résultats obtenus grâce à des olfactomètres tubulaires, soit l’attraction par des COVs issus de racines hachées et l’attraction par le 2-pentylfuran, volatil contenu dans les racines d’orge. [less ▲]

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See detailLaryngeal diseases
Peeters, Dominique ULg; Clercx, Cécile ULg

in Tilley, L. P.; Smith, F. W. (Eds.) Blackwell’s Five Minute Veterinary Consult: Canine & Feline, 5th edition (2011)

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See detailLaryngeal dysfunction after thyroid surgery: diagnostic and treatments
FINCK, Camille ULg

in Acta Chirurgica Belgica (2006), 106

Vocal fold hypomobility after thyroidectomy is a frequent complication of thyroidectomy. Laryngeal nerve paresis or paralysis may present with various symptoms like dysphagia, aspiration, voice alteration ... [more ▼]

Vocal fold hypomobility after thyroidectomy is a frequent complication of thyroidectomy. Laryngeal nerve paresis or paralysis may present with various symptoms like dysphagia, aspiration, voice alteration or dyspnea. Are described: the normal anatomophysiology of the larynx, the symptoms of nerve trauma following thyroidectomy, techniques of thoroughfull laryngeal and voice examination, some clinical entities( unilateral recurrent nerve paralysis, bilateral recurrent nerve paralysis, superior laryngeal nerve paralysis),natural evolution of paralysis, prognosis and management of laryngeal paralysis) [less ▲]

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See detailLaryngeal Mask
Janssens, Marc ULg; Lamy, Maurice ULg

in Intensive Care World (1993), 10(2), 99-102

The laryngeal mask, provides a totally patent airway when positioned in the hypopharynx with remarkable patient tolerance, even at very light planes of sedation. The major advantages of the laryngeal mask ... [more ▼]

The laryngeal mask, provides a totally patent airway when positioned in the hypopharynx with remarkable patient tolerance, even at very light planes of sedation. The major advantages of the laryngeal mask are its ease of insertion, the absence of contact with the vocal cards, and the fact that it frees the hands of the anesthesiologist. Contraindications to its use result from its failure to seal the airway against regurgitation of gastric content. Laryngeal masks can be used easily instead of facial masks during anesthesia with spontaneous ventilation and, with experience, can be used for longer procedures using controlled ventilation. Suspected difficult intubation and establishment of a patent airway in emergency conditions are good indications for the use of this device. The laryngeal mask does not replace endotracheal intubation. It can, however, permit better management of the airway while waiting for personnel trained in endotracheal intubation. The nature of the pulmonary pathology seen in intensive care patients limits use of the laryngeal mask during intensive care. In the operating room few complications have been described, and postoperative discomfort is minimal. The laryngeal mask is a device positioned in the hypopharynx which allows separation of the digestive tract from the airway, without violation of either the larynx or the upper oesophageal sphincter. An endotracheal tube, because of its positioning, hinders normal glottic movement and narrows the airway.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) [less ▲]

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See detailLaryngeal paralysis-polyneuropathy complex in a litter of Pyrenean Mountain dogs.
Peeters, Dominique ULg; Clercx, Cécile ULg; Vanham, Luc et al

in Proceedings of the 10th Annual Congress of the ESVIM (2000)

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See detailLaryngeal paralysis-polyneuropathy complex in young related Pyrenean Mountain dogs.
Gabriel, Alexandra; Poncelet, Luc; Van Ham, Luc et al

in Journal of Small Animal Practice (2006), 47(3)

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See detailLaryngeal Rhabdomyoma in a Golden Retriever
Clercx, Cécile ULg; Desmecht, Daniel ULg; Michiels, L. et al

in Veterinary Record : Journal of the British Veterinary Association (1998), 143(7), 196-8

A three-year-old male golden retriever had had progressive dyspnoea, exercise intolerance, stridor, and a modified bark for five months. A mass 2 cm in diameter was present dorsal to the right side of the ... [more ▼]

A three-year-old male golden retriever had had progressive dyspnoea, exercise intolerance, stridor, and a modified bark for five months. A mass 2 cm in diameter was present dorsal to the right side of the larynx. Histological examination revealed cross-striations in some elongated cells, consistent with a diagnosis of rhabdomyoma, a diagnosis which was confirmed by positive immunohistochemical staining for myoglobin and desmin. The mass could not be removed without total laryngectomy and a permanent tracheostomy and the dog was euthanased. [less ▲]

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See detailLe larynx cicatriciel: rééducation logopédique
Morsomme, Dominique ULg; Ingrid, Verduyckt

Conference (2006, May 05)

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