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Peer Reviewed
See detailLa malaria: du diagnostic au traitement curatif
Delanaye, Pierre ULg; Nkoghe, D.; Demonty, Jean ULg

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2000), 55(6), 510-5

Malaria is a parasitic disease, with variable severity, provoked by the Plasmodium. It is present in tropical zones. The diagnosis is evoked by a fever occurring in a subject coming from a zone at risk ... [more ▼]

Malaria is a parasitic disease, with variable severity, provoked by the Plasmodium. It is present in tropical zones. The diagnosis is evoked by a fever occurring in a subject coming from a zone at risk, and is confirmed by microbiology. Considering the high prevalence of resistance to chloroquine, the treatment rests on quinine (or its derivatives) associated (or not) with an antibiotic. The severe forms of malaria, due to Plasmodium falciparum, are responsible for a high mortality rate. It requires urgent hospital management is required. Criteria defining this form deserve to be perfectly known. [less ▲]

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See detailMalathion Resistance Increases Male Reproductive Success In Tribolium Castaneum (Coleoptera : Tenebrionidae)
Arnaud, L.; Haubruge, Eric ULg; Gaspar, Charles ULg

in Annales de la Societe Entomologique de France (1999), 35

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See detailThe malathion-specific resistance gene confers a sperm competition advantage in Tribolium castaneum
Arnaud, Ludovic; Haubruge, Eric ULg; Gage, Matthew

in Functional Ecology (2005)

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See detailMalattia di Aujeszky. Il virus, patogenesi ed epidemiologia
Thiry, Etienne ULg; Muylkens, Benoît ULg

in Suinicoltura (2007), 9

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See detailMalattia e introspezione
Dondero, Maria Giulia ULg

in Marrone, Gianfranco (Ed.) Il discorso della salute. Verso una sociosemiotica medica (2005)

Cet article étudie le genre photographique du portrait et celui de la nature morte en les mettant en relation avec la représentation de la maladie et de la déformation corporelle. On analyse un corpus ... [more ▼]

Cet article étudie le genre photographique du portrait et celui de la nature morte en les mettant en relation avec la représentation de la maladie et de la déformation corporelle. On analyse un corpus d’images photographiques de l’artiste J.-P. Witkin qui mettent en scène des corps affectés par le dysfonctionnement des organes. Ces derniers ne sont pas représentés comme des corps vivants et uniques, différemment de ce qui se passe dans le genre pictural du portrait (qui implique une forme de vie singularisante), mais ils figurent comme des objets de design ou comme des natures mortes. Cette recherche met donc en évidence l’écart entre les genres stabilisés dans la tradition picturale et les genres photographiques. [less ▲]

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See detailMalcolm Lowry : Voyage au fond de nos abîmes
Pagnoulle, Christine ULg

Book published by L'Age d'homme (1977)

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See detailMalcolm Lowry, Under the Volcano
Pagnoulle, Christine ULg

in Pouvelle, Jean; Demarche, Jean-Pierre (Eds.) Guide de la littérature britannique des origines à nos jours (2008)

This is a short introduction, in French, intended for students from 16 to 20. It brings out the most outstanding features of Lowry's major novel and provides three original translations.

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See detailMALDI -MSI and Ovarian Cancer Biomarkers
Longuespée, Rémi ULg; Boyon, Charlotte; Kerdraon, Olivier et al

in Cancer Treatment (2011)

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See detailMALDI imaging and profiling MS of higher mass proteins from tissue.
Van Remoortere, Alexandra; Van Zeijl, René; Van den Oever, Nico et al

in Journal of the American Society for Mass Spectrometry (2010), 21(11), 1922-9

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See detailMALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry for Studying Cancer Diseases
Longuespée, Rémi ULg; Boyon, Charlotte; Vinatier, Denis et al

Conference (2011, February)

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See detailMALDI imaging mass spectrometry in ovarian cancer for tracking, identifying, and validating biomarkers.
El Ayed, Mohamed; Bonnel, David; Longuespée, Rémi ULg et al

in Medical Science Monitor : International Medical Journal of Experimental and Clinical Research (2010), 16(8), 233-45

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See detailMALDI In-Source Decay for High Throughput sequencing of peptide animal toxins
Quinton, Loïc ULg; Degueldre, Michel ULg; Gilles, Nicolas et al

Poster (2012)

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See detailMALDI in-source decay of high mass protein isoforms: application to alpha- and beta-tubulin variants.
Calligaris, David ULg; Villard, Claude; Terras, Lionel et al

in Analytical Chemistry (2010), 82(14), 6176-6184

Tubulin is one of the major targets in cancer chemotherapy and the target of more than twenty percent of the cancer chemotherapic agents. The modulation of isoform content has been hypothesized as being a ... [more ▼]

Tubulin is one of the major targets in cancer chemotherapy and the target of more than twenty percent of the cancer chemotherapic agents. The modulation of isoform content has been hypothesized as being a cause of resistance to treatment. Isoform differences lie mostly in the C-terminus part of the protein. Extensive characterization of this polypeptide region is therefore of critical importance. MALDI-TOF fragmentation of tubulin C-terminal domains was tested using synthetic peptides. Then, isotypes from HeLa cells were successfully characterized for the first time by in-source decay (ISD) fragmentation of their C-terminus coupled to a pseudo MS3 technique named T3-sequencing. The fragmentation occurred in-source, preferentially generating yn-series ions. This approach required guanidination for the characterization of the βIII-tubulin C-terminus peptide. This study is, to our knowledge, the first example of reflectron in-source decay (reISD) of the C-terminus of a 50 kDa protein. This potentially occurs via a CID-like mechanism occurring in the MALDI plume. There are now new avenues for top-down characterization of important clinical biomarkers such as βIII-tubulin isotypes, a potential marker of drug resistance and tumor progression. This paper raises the challenge of protein isotypes characterization for early cancer detection and treatment monitoring. [less ▲]

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See detailMALDI In-Source Decay, from sequencing to imaging
Debois, Delphine ULg; Smargiasso, Nicolas ULg; Demeure, Kevin ULg et al

in Topics in Current Chemistry (2013), 331

MALDI is now a mature method allowing the identification and, more challenging, the quantification of biopolymers (proteins, nucleic acids, glycans…). MALDI spectra show mostly intact singly charged ions ... [more ▼]

MALDI is now a mature method allowing the identification and, more challenging, the quantification of biopolymers (proteins, nucleic acids, glycans…). MALDI spectra show mostly intact singly charged ions. To obtain fragments, the activation of singly charged precursors is necessary, but not efficient above 3.5 kDa thus making MALDI MS/MS difficult for large species. In-source decay (ISD) is a prompt fragmentation reaction that can be induced thermally or by radicals. As fragments are formed in the source, precursor ions cannot be selected; however, the technique is not limited by the mass of the analyzed compounds and pseudo MS/MS can be performed on intense fragments. The discovery of new matrices that enhance the ISD yield, combined with the high sensitivity of MALDI mass spectrometers, and software development, opens new perspectives. We first review the mechanisms involved in the ISD processes, then discuss ISD applications like top-down sequencing and post-translational modifications studies, and finally review MALDI-ISD tissue imaging applications. [less ▲]

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See detailMALDI Mass Spectrometry Imaging for the Screening of Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Biomarkers.
Boyon, Charlotte; Longuespée, Rémi ULg; Kerdraon, Olivier et al

Poster (2011, September)

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See detailMALDI mass spectrometry imaging of proteins exceeding 30,000 daltons.
Franck, Julien; Longuespée, Rémi ULg; Wisztorski, Maxence et al

in Medical Science Monitor : International Medical Journal of Experimental and Clinical Research (2010), 16(9), 293-9

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See detailMALDI mass spectrometry imaging of secreted lipopeptides in a bacterial biofilm colonizing plant roots
Debois, Delphine ULg; Jourdan, Emmanuel ULg; Ongena, Marc ULg et al

Conference (2011, June 06)

During the aggression of a plant by a pathogen, different immune reactions may occur. "Induced Systemic Resistance” (ISR) is triggered by the specific interaction between plant and non-pathogenic ... [more ▼]

During the aggression of a plant by a pathogen, different immune reactions may occur. "Induced Systemic Resistance” (ISR) is triggered by the specific interaction between plant and non-pathogenic microorganism. The first step (of three) consists in the perception by plant cells of elicitors produced by the inducing agents that initiates the phenomenon. One class of known elicitors is antibiotics including surfactin- and fengycin-type lipopeptides. Recent studies in biology, genetics or biochemistry allowed a better understanding of the interactions between plants and microorganism but few has been done at the molecular level. MALDI MS imaging has been used to study the nature of the secreted lipopeptides, their relative quantity and their distribution in the root’s environment. Disinfected tomato seeds were first incubated at 28°C in sterile conditions for germination. Germinated seeds were then treated with freshly-grown cells of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens S499 and placed in Petri dish on ITO glass slide recovered with a thin layer of plant nutritive solution (Hoagland) containing 1,75% of agar. Petri dishes were finally incubated vertically in phytotron during 10 days (28°C, photoperiod 16h). For MALDI imaging experiments, the ITO slide was removed from the agar and dried in a dessiccator under vacuum. The matrix solution (9-aminoacridine) was applied with an ImagePrep automated sprayer (Bruker Daltonics). An UltraFlex II TOF/TOF mass spectrometer was used to record molecular cartographies. The average mass spectra recorded around the tomato root (2-3 mm on both sides of the root) showed that lipopeptides were major compounds detected on the agar. Only the surfactins have been detected when working with the S499 strain. The most abundant surfactins were those with longer fatty acyl chain lengths, such as C14- and C15-homologues. Such a surfactin signature is interesting since homologues with the longest acyl chains are also the more active biologically. The distribution of surfactins showed a gradient representing the diffusion of the molecules during the root growth. The more the fatty acyl chain is long, the more the surfactin is detected near the root. Other compounds detected during the analysis showed a clear anti-colocalization with the surfactins. Future work will be focused on the influence of the plant species (tobacco, salad, Arabidopsis thaliana) on the secretion of lipopeptides (type, concentration…) and the influence of the strain of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens regarding its ability to selectively produce specific lipopeptide families (overproducing or repressed mutants). This MS imaging technique thus appears to be a very powerful method to study in situ production of bioactive lipopeptides by bacteria developing on roots. This is crucial for a better understanding of the molecular dialogue governing perception of beneficial Bacillus strains by the host plant. This study provides a first analysis over a long root section of lipopeptides secreted by a bacterial biofilm colonizing plant. [less ▲]

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See detailMALDI Mass Spectrometry Imaging: a new tool to decipher the antibiome of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens
Debois, Delphine ULg; Jourdan, Emmanuel; Cawoy, Hélène et al

Conference (2014, June 05)

Soil Bacillus isolates may devote up to 8% of their genome to nonribosomal synthesis of lipopeptide (LP)- and polyketide (PK)-type antibiotics. LPs from surfactin, iturin and fengycin families are known ... [more ▼]

Soil Bacillus isolates may devote up to 8% of their genome to nonribosomal synthesis of lipopeptide (LP)- and polyketide (PK)-type antibiotics. LPs from surfactin, iturin and fengycin families are known to exert different actions on the wellness of the producing strain such as fungitoxicity (iturin, fengycin) or motility, root colonization and immune stimulating agent (surfactin). Nevertheless, few is reported about the actual antibiome secreted in situ by Bacillus cells during confrontation with phytopathogens or plant root colonization. We developed a method mimicking the conditions prevailing in the rhizosphere and, taking advantage of the versatility of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging, we were able to localize and identify antibiotics produced in situ by bacterial cells. First, we applied this new methodology to bioassays in which Bacillus amyloliquefaciens 98S were grown together with Fusarium oxysporum, with the aim of deciphering the role of the different LP families during the phytopathogen growth inhibition. Our results showed that the three LP families were readily produced in different proportions. Especially, images of surfactins, iturins and fengycins demonstrated that iturins are the antibiotic family actually involved in the antagonism against Fusarium oxysporum. In a second approach, we used a “in planta” model in which Bacillus amyloliquefaciens S499 was simultaneously grown with Tomato and Arabidopsis thaliana roots. Imaging results, obtained during a time course analysis, showed that surfactin is always the major lipopeptide detected. In further experiments involving a refined time-window, we observed that surfactin is actually produced as soon as 24h post inoculation. These results were the starting point of a wider study showing that the early accumulation of surfactin is a complex phenomenon involving, among other mechanisms, cell-well components recognition by bacteria, and that this interaction is a win-win association for both plant and bacterial cells. [less ▲]

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See detailMALDI MS Tissue Imaging of Crystallins using an original metyhod to direct protein identification on lens slices
Bertrand, Virginie ULg; Debois, Delphine ULg; Quinton, Loïc ULg et al

Poster (2010, April 16)

The lens is a transparent, biconvex structure in the eye that, along with the cornea, helps to refract light to be focused on the retina. Crystallins, α, β and γ, are the predominant structural proteins ... [more ▼]

The lens is a transparent, biconvex structure in the eye that, along with the cornea, helps to refract light to be focused on the retina. Crystallins, α, β and γ, are the predominant structural proteins in lens. They constitute 90% of water soluble proteins and contribute to its transparency and refractive properties by a uniform concentration gradient in the lens. Nevertheless, if these crystallins undergo post translational modifications, they become less soluble and the opacity of eye lens increases. This phenomenon defines cataract. Yet, the nature and the mechanism of occurring of these modifications and how they happen are not fully understood. MALDI mass spectrometry imaging is a recent technique allowing examining proteins in their native location without the need for traditional processing methods such as extraction, homogenization, and separation. Nevertheless, one main difficulty lies in the identification of the detected species, especially proteins. MALDI-In Source Decay (MALDI-ISD) is a fragmentation process occurring in the mass spectrometer ion source. When the analyzed sample is a protein, ISD fragmentation leads to b-, c- and z-ions series, which allows for some sequencing of the protein. One great advantage of ISD is its fastness and easiness to be implemented since there is no need for a special treatment of the sample. The only requirement is the use of “ISD-favourable MALDI matrix” such as 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid or 1,5-diaminonaphtalene. 18 µm-thick equatorial sections of frozen porcine eye lenses were realized with a cryostat. 1,5-DAN matrix was either manually deposited or sprayed with an ImagePrep automated device (Bruker Daltonics). Data were acquired with an UltraFlex II MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometer (BD) in positive reflector mode. For imaging experiments, the surface of the sample was divided into 100-µm-wide pixels and 500 shots were averaged on each. Based on calculated mass differences between consecutive ISD fragments peaks, tags of amino acids were established and submitted to a search in protein databases using a BLAST algorithm (search by sequence homology). Imaging experiments showed that the localization information may be very useful to associate fragments which exhibit close distributions, suggesting they are originating from the same protein. It is thus possible to arrange fragments in groups of probable origin and to extract the mass spectrum of a high-intensity pixel. This allows to work with a “purified” ISD mass spectrum where fragments of only one protein are present and potentially exhibiting a higher number of peaks, leading to a longer tag and to an easier identification. With this imaging strategy, we were able to identify (by homology) the Beta-Crystallins S and B2, the Gamma-Crystallin B, the Alpha-Crystallin A. [less ▲]

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See detailMALDI MSI for ovarian cancer biomarkers research: latest developments of the technology for screening and tracking.
Longuespée, Rémi ULg

in Histochemistry & Cell Biology (2012, July), 138(1), 141-54

Detailed reference viewed: 15 (1 ULg)