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See detailAntibiotic therapy and outcome in ICU
ANCION, Arnaud ULg; LAYIOS, Nathalie ULg; NYS, Monique ULg et al

Conference (2012)

Detailed reference viewed: 33 (17 ULg)
See detailAntibiotics and peptidoglycan metabolism
Ghuysen, Jean-Marie ULg

in Sammes, Peter G (Ed.) Topics in Antibiotic Chemistry. vol 5 (1980)

A review with 305 refs. is given on bacterial cell wall peptidoglycan metab. and on the mechanisms of action of antibiotics that inhibit cell wall formation. [on SciFinder(R)]

Detailed reference viewed: 16 (1 ULg)
See detailAntibiotics and pesticides residues in aquaculture products
Scippo, Marie-Louise ULg

Conference (2010, April 28)

Detailed reference viewed: 60 (16 ULg)
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See detailAntibiotiques et forfaits hospitaliers
Van Hees, Thierry ULg

Conference (2010, February 09)

Detailed reference viewed: 24 (9 ULg)
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See detailAntibiotiques et patient dialysé: trois cas de toxicité neurologique du céfépime
Parotte, Marie-Christine ULg; Krzesinski, Jean-Marie ULg

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2008), 63

The metabolism of drugs is altered in dialysed patients. We report three clinical cases of neurological toxicity from cefepime in dialysed patient. This molecule can induce in renal insufficiency patients ... [more ▼]

The metabolism of drugs is altered in dialysed patients. We report three clinical cases of neurological toxicity from cefepime in dialysed patient. This molecule can induce in renal insufficiency patients various reversible neurological manifestations like metabolic encephalopathy, myoclonies, or a state of status epilepticus tha mimics sometimes a coma in spite of adequate dosing. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 202 (4 ULg)
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See detailLes antibiotiques topiques en Europe: résistances insulaires et indifférence continentale?
Henry, Frédérique ULg; Thirion, Laurence; Franchimont, Claudine ULg et al

in Dermatologie Actualité (2005), 92

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See detailAntibodies against bovine herpesvirus 4 are highly prevalent in wild African buffaloes throughout eastern and southern Africa
Dewals, Benjamin G ULg; Gillet, Laurent ULg; Gerdes, Truuske et al

in Veterinary Microbiology (2005), 110(3-4), 209-220

Bovine herpesvirus 4 (BoHV-4) has been isolated from cattle throughout the world. Interestingly, a survey of wild African buffaloes mainly from the Maasai Mara Game Reserve in Kenya revealed that 94% of ... [more ▼]

Bovine herpesvirus 4 (BoHV-4) has been isolated from cattle throughout the world. Interestingly, a survey of wild African buffaloes mainly from the Maasai Mara Game Reserve in Kenya revealed that 94% of the animals tested had anti-BoHV-4 antibodies [Rossiter, P.B., Gumm, I.D., Stagg, D.A., Conrad, PA., Mukolwe, S., Davies, F.G., White, H., 1989. Isolation of bovine herpesvirus-3 from African buffaloes (Syncerus caffer). Res. Vet. Sci. 46, 337-343]. These authors also proposed that the serological antigenic relationship existing between BoHV-4 and alcelaphine herpesvirus I (A1HV-1) could confer to BoHV-4 infected buffaloes a protective immune response against lethal A1HV-1 infection. In the present study, we addressed two questions related to Rossiter et al. paper. Firstly, to investigate the role of the African buffalo as a natural host species of BoHV-4, the seroprevalence of anti-BoHV-4 antibodies was analysed in wild African buffaloes throughout eastern and southern Africa. A total of 400 sera was analysed using two complementary immunofluorescent assays. These analyses revealed that independently of their geographical origin, wild African buffaloes exhibit a seroprevalence of anti-BoHV-4 antibodies higher than 68%. This result is by far above the seroprevalence generally observed in cattle. Our data are discussed in the light of our recent phylogenetic study demonstrating that the BoHV-4 Bo17 gene has been acquired from a recent ancestor of the African buffalo. Secondly, we investigated the humoral antigenic relationship existing between BoHV-4 and A1HV-1. Our results demonstrate that among the antigens expressed in A1HV-1 infected cells, epitope(s) recognised by anti-BoHV-4 antibodies are exclusively nuclear, suggesting that the putative property of BoHV-4 to confer an immune protection against A1HV-1 relies on a cellular rather than on a humoral immune response. (c) 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 38 (8 ULg)
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See detailAntibodies against salmon calcitonin: absence of blocking properties
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Azria, M; Bleicher, M et al

in Journal of Bone and Mineral Research (1989), 4(S1), 948

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See detailAntibodies against vaccinia virus do not neutralize extracellular enveloped virus but prevent virus release from infected cells and comet formation
Vanderplasschen, Alain ULg; Hollinshead, M.; Smith, G. L.

in Journal of General Virology (The) (1997), 78(Pt 8), 2041-2048

Detailed reference viewed: 7 (0 ULg)
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See detailAntibodies and resistance: fact or fantasy
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Franchimont, P

in Hungarian Rhumatology (1991), 32

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See detailAntibodies Dynamics in the Broiler Digestive Tract after Salmonella Typhimurium Oral Challenge
Marcq, Christopher ULg; Cox, Edwin; Thewis, André ULg et al

in Duclos, Michel; Nys, Yves (Eds.) XIIIth European Poultry Conference: Program & Book of Abstracts, World's Poultry Science Journal, Volume 66, Supplement (2010, August)

This study aimed to provide directions for Salmonella challenge experiment conception by offering a better understanding of the relationship between age and mucosal immune responsiveness of chicken ... [more ▼]

This study aimed to provide directions for Salmonella challenge experiment conception by offering a better understanding of the relationship between age and mucosal immune responsiveness of chicken. Intestinal maternal immunity of Salmonella-free chicks was monitored by ELISA analyses at 2, 9 and 16 days of age. At 21 days of age, chicks were orally inoculated with Salmonella Typhimurium. Three inoculum doses (3 x 10E3, 3 x 10E6, 3 x 10E9 cfu/bird) and an uninfected control were then compared concerning mucosal immune status of the small intestine and cecum. Results suggest that difficulties encountered to infect very young chicks can be related, at least partly, to maternal immunity. The relatively low level of intestinal immune defences observed thereafter could indicate a right time to perform an experimental infection of birds and to maximize the spreading of the pathogen during challenge experiment. After infection of 3-week-old chickens, the mucosal immune response was rapid with increased anti-Salmonella Typhimurium IgA titers. There was a linear relationship between specific IgA levels in intestinal and cecal secretions and the challenge dose initially inoculated. [less ▲]

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See detailAntibodies to laminin in Chagas' disease
Szarfman, A.; Terranova, V. P.; Rennard, S. I. et al

in Journal of Experimental Medicine (1982), 155(4), 1161-71

We have found that sera from humans with Chagas' disease and Rhesus monkeys infected with Trypanosoma cruzi contain IgM and IgG antibodies, which react with structures in a variety of connective tissues ... [more ▼]

We have found that sera from humans with Chagas' disease and Rhesus monkeys infected with Trypanosoma cruzi contain IgM and IgG antibodies, which react with structures in a variety of connective tissues. These antibodies react with laminin but not with various other purified connective tissue components like collagen types I, III, IV, and V, fibronectin, heparan sulfate (BM-1) proteoglycan, or chondronectin. The tissue-reacting antibodies were isolated by absorption to a laminin-Sepharose column. The bound fraction contained all the tissue-reacting antibodies. These antibodies strongly stained trypomastigotes and amastigotes, but weakly stained epimastigotes. These studies show that sera from T. cruzi-infected primates contain antilaminin antibodies, which may be produced by those host in response to a laminin-like molecule present in the parasite. [less ▲]

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See detailAntibodies to laminin in preeclampsia.
Foidart, Jean-Michel ULg; Hunt, J.; Lapière, C. M. et al

in Kidney International (1986), 29(5), 1050-57

Laminin is a large basement membrane glycoprotein localized in the trophoblast, glomerular basement membrane and in the mesangial matrix of human glomeruli. It promotes the attachment of epithelial cells ... [more ▼]

Laminin is a large basement membrane glycoprotein localized in the trophoblast, glomerular basement membrane and in the mesangial matrix of human glomeruli. It promotes the attachment of epithelial cells to basement membrane collagen. We have found that 14 sera from 52 patients with severe preeclampsia or eclampsia contain IgG and IgM antibodies which react with placental and kidney basement membranes. These antibodies were specific for laminin and did not react with other basement membrane proteins. They were able to fix complement. They have been demonstrated by radial immunodiffusion, radioimmunoassay and immunofluorescence blocking studies. In primary cultures they were shown to impair the attachment of trophoblast cells to basement membrane collagen. High levels of circulating immune complexes were detected only in sera from preeclamptic patients with circulating antibodies to laminin. The auto-antibodies to laminin could play a major role in the pathogenesis of severe preeclampsia by impairing the attachment of trophoblast cells to placental basement membranes and by fixation to the glomerular basement membranes and mesangial matrix. [less ▲]

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See detailAntibodies to purified renal tubular epithelial antigens contain activity against laminin, fibronectin, and type IV collagen.
Hagendoorn, P.; Bruijn, J. A.; VandenBroek, L. J. et al

in Laboratory Investigation : Journal of Technical Methods & Pathology (1988), 58(3), 278-86

Antibodies directed against tubular brush border antigens (RTE) are used to induce heterologous immune-complex nephritis. Among these antigens a glycoprotein with a molecular weight of 330 kilodaltons ... [more ▼]

Antibodies directed against tubular brush border antigens (RTE) are used to induce heterologous immune-complex nephritis. Among these antigens a glycoprotein with a molecular weight of 330 kilodaltons (gp330) has been shown to be of pathogenetic significance. We investigated whether antibodies other than those directed against gp330 are present in anti-RTE and whether they play a pathogenetic role. By using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay techniques and Western blotting, we investigated polyclonal antibodies directed not only against crude RTE but also against RTEgp, a purified glycoprotein fraction of RTE, with respect to activity against glomerular basement membrane (GBM) components laminin, fibronectin, and type IV collagen. Both antibody preparations showed reactivity predominantly to the 220 kilodaltons subunit of laminin. Lower but nevertheless distinct reactivity to fibronectin and type IV collagen was also found. The antibody fraction directed against components of the GBM, which was isolated from anti-RTE IgG by affinity chromatography, showed linear binding to the GBM in indirect immunofluorescence studies. Injection of these antibodies into the renal artery also led to linear binding to the GBM with linear deposition of complement factors 3 and 9 and induced a weak and transient proteinuria. Immunoelectron microscopy revealed binding of the antibodies to glomerular epithelial and endothelial cell surfaces adjacent to the GBM. Injection of anti-RTE antibody absorbed to GBM components resulted in binding of antibodies and complement factors 3 and 9 in a fine granular pattern along the GBM, whereas injection of unabsorbed anti-RTE led to a course granular pattern. We conclude that the presence of antibodies (cross-)reacting with laminin, fibronectin, and type IV collagen in anti-RTE antibody has pathogenetic effects and could explain differences in pathogenicity between monospecific anti-gp330 antibody and polyclonal anti-RTE antibody. [less ▲]

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See detailAntibodies to Type II Collagen in Relapsing Polychondritis
Foidart, Jean-Michel ULg; Abe, S.; Martin, G. R. et al

in New England Journal of Medicine [=NEJM] (1978), 299

Relapsing polychondritis is a disorder of unknown cause characterized by the destruction of cartilage. To test the hypothesis that immunologic mechanisms are involved in the pathogenesis of relapsing ... [more ▼]

Relapsing polychondritis is a disorder of unknown cause characterized by the destruction of cartilage. To test the hypothesis that immunologic mechanisms are involved in the pathogenesis of relapsing polychondritis, we analyzed the serum of 15 patients for the presence of antibodies to cartilage. Antibodies to Type II (cartilage) collagen were found in the serum of five patients at the time of acute symptoms. No antibodies were detected either to cartilage proteoglycan or to other collagen types. The antibodies were detected at the onset of the disease and their titers appeared to correlate with severity of disease. Circulating immune complexes were also detected in the serum of these patients. Our findings support an immunologic involvement in this condition. [less ▲]

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See detailAntibodies to varicella-zoster virus modulate antigen distribution but fail to induce viral persistence in vitro.
Sadzot-Delvaux, Catherine ULg; Marc, Philippe; Lebon, Linda et al

in Journal of Virology (1992), 66(12), 7499-504

Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) persists in human sensory ganglia. One of the hypotheses to explain the induction or the maintenance of VZV latency is that it could be promoted by the immune response itself ... [more ▼]

Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) persists in human sensory ganglia. One of the hypotheses to explain the induction or the maintenance of VZV latency is that it could be promoted by the immune response itself. It is known that in the case of viruses which bud off the infected cell membrane, virus-specific antibodies can induce antigenic modulation, i.e., spatial redistribution of viral antigens and modulation of their synthesis. To determine whether antigenic modulation occurs during VZV infection in vitro and could possibly be involved in viral persistence, we have grown infected cells in the presence of anti-VZV antibodies either transiently or permanently. The distribution of immune complexes and viral proteins was then analyzed. In transient immunomodulation experiments, the distribution of one or more viral antigens was modified not only in the cytoplasmic membranes but also in the cytoplasm and nucleoplasm of infected cells. When infected cells were kept permanently in the presence of antibodies, the same pattern of redistribution of immune complexes was observed and the localization of internal viral glycoproteins was significantly modified. However, antibodies did not prevent the lytic effect of infection; they altered neither the infectious virus yield nor the Western immunoblot pattern of viral proteins, suggesting that immunomodulation is not the primary effector of viral persistence. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 23 (9 ULg)
See detailAntibodies to varicella-zoster virus modulate antigen distribution in cultured infected cells
Marc, Ph.; Sadzot-Delvaux, Catherine ULg; Merville, Marie-Paule ULg et al

in Archives Internationales de Physiologie et de Biochimie (1989), 97

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See detailAntibody evasion by a gammaherpesvirus o-glycan shield.
Machiels, Bénédicte ULg; Lété, Céline ULg; Guillaume, Antoine ULg et al

in PLoS Pathogens (2011), 7(11), 1002387

All gammaherpesviruses encode a major glycoprotein homologous to the Epstein-Barr virus gp350. These glycoproteins are often involved in cell binding, and some provide neutralization targets. However, the ... [more ▼]

All gammaherpesviruses encode a major glycoprotein homologous to the Epstein-Barr virus gp350. These glycoproteins are often involved in cell binding, and some provide neutralization targets. However, the capacity of gammaherpesviruses for long-term transmission from immune hosts implies that in vivo neutralization is incomplete. In this study, we used Bovine Herpesvirus 4 (BoHV-4) to determine how its gp350 homolog - gp180 - contributes to virus replication and neutralization. A lack of gp180 had no impact on the establishment and maintenance of BoHV-4 latency, but markedly sensitized virions to neutralization by immune sera. Antibody had greater access to gB, gH and gL on gp180-deficient virions, including neutralization epitopes. Gp180 appears to be highly O-glycosylated, and removing O-linked glycans from virions also sensitized them to neutralization. It therefore appeared that gp180 provides part of a glycan shield for otherwise vulnerable viral epitopes. Interestingly, this O-glycan shield could be exploited for neutralization by lectins and carbohydrate-specific antibody. The conservation of O-glycosylation sites in all gp350 homologs suggests that this is a general evasion mechanism that may also provide a therapeutic target. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 93 (29 ULg)