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See detailAntiobesity pharmacotherapy in the management of type 2 diabetes.
Scheen, André ULg; Lefebvre, Pierre ULg

in Diabetes/Metabolism Research & Reviews (2000), 16(2), 114-24

Obesity is a well-known risk factor for the development of Type 2 diabetes mellitus. The management of the obese diabetic patient remains a challenge for the clinician but, in any case, weight reduction ... [more ▼]

Obesity is a well-known risk factor for the development of Type 2 diabetes mellitus. The management of the obese diabetic patient remains a challenge for the clinician but, in any case, weight reduction should be considered as a key objective. In this respect, several antiobesity drugs have demonstrated potential. However, while fenfluramine and dexfenfluramine have been shown to promote weight loss and to directly improve insulin sensitivity, being two mechanisms contributing to better blood glucose control in obese Type 2 diabetic patients, they were recently withdrawn due to safety problems. Sibutramine, a new selective norepinephrine and serotonin reuptake inhibitor, promotes weight loss by decreasing food intake, an effect which leads to a mild improvement (significant in patients losing > or =5% of initial body weight) of blood glucose control in obese diabetic patients. Similarly, orlistat, a selective gastrointestinal lipase inhibitor which increases faecal fat losses, enhances diet-induced weight reduction and improves both blood glucose control and vascular risk profile, especially dyslipidaemia, in obese Type 2 diabetic patients. Further studies are required to better identify good responders to pharmacotherapy and specify the role of antiobesity agents in the overall long-term management of obese subjects with Type 2 diabetes. Other novel pharmacological approaches deserve further consideration, for instance beta-3 agonists aiming to increase energy expenditure, drugs interfering with tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) or free fatty acid release by the adipose tissue or agents that slow gastric emptying. However, until now, results regarding efficacy and/or safety have been disappointing or preliminary in humans. [less ▲]

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See detailAntioxidant Activity of Compounds Isolated from the Root Woods of Erythrina droogmansiana
Yaya, AJG; Feumba, RD; Emmanuel, T et al

in International Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Drug Research (2014), 6(2), 160-163

The aim of this study was to isolate, to characterize secondary metabolites from methanolic extract of the root woods of Erythrina droogmansiana and to assess the antioxidant activity of the crude extract ... [more ▼]

The aim of this study was to isolate, to characterize secondary metabolites from methanolic extract of the root woods of Erythrina droogmansiana and to assess the antioxidant activity of the crude extract and isolated compounds. The phytochemical study led to the isolation of 3-(3’,4’-methelenedioxyphenyl)-2,3-epoxypropanol (1), asperphenamate (2) and three flavonoids namely genistein, diadzein and 4’,5,7-trihydroxy-8-prenylisoflavone. These compounds were characterized using their 1H NMR, 13C NMR, HMBC, HSQC, COSY, mass spectral and the literature. To evaluate antioxidant activity of crude extract and isolated compounds, the radical scavenging (DPPH) and Ferric Reducing Ability Power (FRAP) were performed using ascorbic acid as standard. Compounds 1 and 2 showed moderate radical scavenging potential with IC50 value of 3.14 and 3.31 mg/ml respectively, and moderate reducing power ability with value of 0.14±0.01 mgAAE/mg and 0.21±0.01 mgAAE/mg respectively. The more active compound was genistein (3) with IC50 value of 1.96 mg/ml for the DPPH radical scavenging potential and 0.24±0.02 mgAAE/mg for its ability to reduce iron. [less ▲]

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See detailAntioxidant Activity of Flavonoids Isolated From the Fruits of Xylopia parviflora (A. Rich.) Benth
Tchinda Tiabou, Alembert ULg; Agbor, GA; Tsala, DE et al

in International Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Drug Research (2014), 6

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See detailAntioxidant activity of Passiflora edulis and Passiflora alata fruits
Yariwake, J.; Zeraik, M.; Serteyn, Didier ULg et al

in Planta Medica (2010, September), 76(12), 1274-1275

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See detailAntioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of Ribes nigrum extracts.
Tabart, Jessica ULg; Franck, Thierry ULg; Kevers, Claire ULg et al

in Food Chemistry (2012), 131(4), 1116-1122

Blackcurrant berries contain high amounts of flavonoids with various health benefits as anti-inflammatory properties attributed to their antioxidant potential. Leaves and buds actually used to produce ... [more ▼]

Blackcurrant berries contain high amounts of flavonoids with various health benefits as anti-inflammatory properties attributed to their antioxidant potential. Leaves and buds actually used to produce food supplement could also exhibit such interesting properties. <br />In the literature, various methods are often used and valid indicators of the antioxidant potential of dietary substances. However these assays do not provide evidence that antioxidants have in vivo or ex vivo activity when consumed. To obtain biologically relevant information, the antioxidant activities of the extracts were evaluated on cellular models implicating the measurement of blood haemolysis, the Cellular Antioxidant Activity on endothelial cells and the anti-inflammatory activities on isolated equine stimulated neutrophils and purified myeloperoxidase. <br />These tests generally showed that the blackcurrant leaf extract have the highest antioxidant and <br />anti-inflammatory (inhibition of MPO activity and ROS production on activated neutrophils) capacities correlated to the highest total phenolics content. [less ▲]

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See detailAntioxidant and anti-inflammatory like properties of benzoic acid analogs on the oxidant response of neutrophils: structure/redox potential relationship study.
Franck, Thierry ULg; Mouithys-Mickalad, Ange ULg; Robert, Thierry ULg et al

in Free Radical Biology & Medicine (2012), 53(supplement 1),

We investigated the antioxidant capacity of phenolic acid derivatives by measuring their capacity to prevent ABTS oxidation and evaluating their anti-inflammatory like-properties on the oxidant response ... [more ▼]

We investigated the antioxidant capacity of phenolic acid derivatives by measuring their capacity to prevent ABTS oxidation and evaluating their anti-inflammatory like-properties on the oxidant response of neutrophils, especially on superoxide anion production and the activity of myeloperoxidase (MPO), an oxidant enzyme present and released by the primary granules of neutrophils. The superoxide anion production by PMA-stimulated neutrophils was measured by lucigenin-enhanced chimiluminescence (CL) and the activity of MPO by SIEFED to study the potential interaction of a molecule with the enzyme without interferences due to medium. The antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of the phenolic compounds were correlated to their redox potentials measured by voltammetry method, and discussed in relation to their molecular structure. The ability of the phenolic molecules to decrease ABTS oxidation and CL production was inversely correlated to their redox potential increasing as follows: propyl gallate > gallic acid > caffeic acid > 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid > ferulic acid > syringic acid > 2,6-dihydroxybenzoic acid > salicylic acid > benzoic acid. The number of hydroxyl groups (3) and their position (catechol) were essential for the efficacy of the molecules as stoichiometric antioxidants or scavengers. On MPO activity, the inhibitory capacity of the molecules was not really correlated with their redox potential and increased as follows: gallic acid > caffeic acid > 2,6-dihydroxybenzoic acid > propyl gallate > ferulic acid = syringic acid > 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid = salicylic acid > benzoic acid. The number of OH groups and the elongation of the carboxyl group were essential for the inhibition of MPO activity, probably by facilitating the interaction with the MPO active site or structure. The redox potential measurement seems to be a good technique to select stoichiometric antioxidants, but not anti-catalytic ones. [less ▲]

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See detailAntioxidant and Antiradical Activities of Manihot esculenta Crantz (Euphorbiaceae) Leaves and Other Selected Tropical Green Vegetables Investigated on Lipoperoxidation and Phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) Activated Monocytes
Tsumbu, César Ndele ULg; Deby-Dupont, Ginette; Tits, Monique ULg et al

in Nutrients (2011), 3(9), 818-838

Abelmoschus esculentus (Malvaceae), Hibiscus acetosella (Malvaceae), Manihot esculenta Crantz (Euphorbiaceae) and Pteridium aquilinum (Dennstaedtiaceae) leaves are currently consumed as vegetables by ... [more ▼]

Abelmoschus esculentus (Malvaceae), Hibiscus acetosella (Malvaceae), Manihot esculenta Crantz (Euphorbiaceae) and Pteridium aquilinum (Dennstaedtiaceae) leaves are currently consumed as vegetables by migrants from sub-Saharan Africa living in Western Europe and by the people in the origin countries, where these plants are also used in the folk medicine. Manihot leaves are also eaten in Latin America and some Asian countries. This work investigated the capacity of aqueous extracts prepared from those vegetables to inhibit the peroxidation of a linoleic acid emulsion. Short chain, volatile C-compounds as markers of advanced lipid peroxidation were measured by gas chromatography by following the ethylene production. The generation of lipid hydroperoxides, was monitored by spectroscopy using N-N′-dimethyl-p-phenylene-diamine (DMPD). The formation of intermediate peroxyl, and other free radicals, at the initiation of the lipid peroxidation was investigated by electron spin resonance, using α-(4-pyridyl-1-oxide)-N-tert-butylnitrone as spin trap agent. The ability of the extracts to decrease the cellular production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in “inflammation like” conditions was studied by fluorescence technique using 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescine-diacetate as fluorogenic probe, in a cell model of human monocytes (HL-60 cells) activated with phorbol ester. Overall the extracts displayed efficient concentration-dependent inhibitory effects. Their total polyphenol and flavonoid content was determined by classic colorimetric methods. An HPLC-UV/DAD analysis has clearly identified the presence of some polyphenolic compounds, which explains at least partially the inhibitions observed in our models. The role of these plants in the folk medicine by sub-Saharan peoples as well as in the prevention of oxidative stress and ROS related diseases requires further consideration. [less ▲]

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See detailAntioxidant and cytotoxicity activity of essential oil grown Lavandula dentata
Imelouane, B.; El Bachiri, A.; Wathelet, Jean-Paul ULg et al

Poster (2009)

The present study describes the phytochemical profile Antioxidant and cytotoxicity activity of Lavandula dentata essential oil, collected in eastern Morocco (Taforalt). The sample of essential oil was ... [more ▼]

The present study describes the phytochemical profile Antioxidant and cytotoxicity activity of Lavandula dentata essential oil, collected in eastern Morocco (Taforalt). The sample of essential oil was obtained from the aerial parts of the plant by hydrodistillation and analyzed by GC–MS. The in vitro cytotoxicity of the oil on the cancer cell lines PC-3 (prostate), V79 (fibroblaste) and normal P388D1 (murine macrophage) was examined. We have shown that the oil had negligible cytotoxic effects against all cell lines tested. The oil was also found to possess antioxidant activity as demonstrated by the 1,1-diphenyl-2- picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical method. Lavandula dentata essential oil has promising potentials for incorporation into various food, cosmetic and pharmaceutical products for which a natural aroma, colour, antioxidant and antimicrobial additive is desired. [less ▲]

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See detailAntioxidant capacity and phenolic composition of red wines from various grape varieties : specificity of pinot noir.
degives, Julien; Kevers, Claire ULg; DEFRAIGNE, Jean ULg et al

in Giuseppe Viali (Ed.) 3rd international conference on cellular environmental stressors in biology and medicine : focus on redox reactions (2014, June 25)

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See detailAntioxidant capacity and phenolic composition of red wines from various grape varieties: Specificity of Pinot Noir.
Van Leeuw, Robin; Kevers, Claire ULg; PINCEMAIL, Joël ULg et al

in Journal of Food Composition and Analysis (2014), 36

Wines produced from various grape varieties present different properties affecting taste and color. The hypothesis was that grape genotype could have a deep impact on wine antioxidant properties and ... [more ▼]

Wines produced from various grape varieties present different properties affecting taste and color. The hypothesis was that grape genotype could have a deep impact on wine antioxidant properties and phenolic composition. But in this study on 38 different wines of 4 main grape varieties, large variability in the levels of individual phenolic compounds as well as in antioxidant capacity was observed in each grape variety. Comparisons of the wine varieties based on their individual phenolic profile (flavonols, anthocyanidins, flavan-3-ols, phenolic acids, resveratrol…) and antioxidant capacities (ORAC, DPPH, hemolysis, ESR, total phenolics) showed limited differences. An exception was the group of wines made from the grape variety Pinot Noir, in which the range of phenolic compounds was different from the other wines: anthocyanidins (87 mg L-1, 119 to 206 mg L-1 in other grape varieties) and flavonols (17 mg L-1, 20 to 57 mg L-1in others except Primitivo) showed lower levels while flavanols (327 mg L-1, 152 to 244 mg L-1 in others) and phenolic acids (161 mg L-1, 103 to 152 mg L-1 in others) showed levels higher than in the other wines. This different profile was associated with a lower antioxidant capacity (i.e. mean ORAC value: 20988 for Pinot Noir, 27820 to 33651 for others). [less ▲]

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See detailAntioxidant capacity of black currant varies with organ, season, and cultivar
Tabart, Jessica; Kevers, Claire ULg; Pincemail, Joël ULg et al

in Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry (2006), 54(17), 6271-6276

Small berries such as black currant constitute one of the important sources of potential health-promoting phytochemicals because these fruits are rich sources of compounds with high antioxidant properties ... [more ▼]

Small berries such as black currant constitute one of the important sources of potential health-promoting phytochemicals because these fruits are rich sources of compounds with high antioxidant properties. In this work, antioxidant capacities of different parts (buds, leaves, fruits) of various black currant cultivars were compared throughout the growing season with the aim to prepare extracts with high antioxidant capacity. Buds (opened, at the end of March) and leaves (in June) had a higher content in phenolics and antioxidants than fully ripened berries (in July) and the best yield (per branch) was obtained with the leaves collected in June due to their higher biomass. The differences observed among the eight cultivars tested were small. Concerning flavonols, quercetin was dominant in all organs and cultivars, myricetin varied widely among the cultivars, and kampferol was very low. [less ▲]

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See detailAntioxidant capacity of hydrophilic food matrices: optimization and validation of ORAC assay.
Kevers, Claire ULg; Sipel, Arnaud; PINCEMAIL, Joël ULg et al

in Food Analytical Methods (2014), 7

It is widely accepted that ORAC is a useful method for assessing food extracts that contain various antioxidants. The principal aim of this study was to validate the ORAC assay. We first identified ... [more ▼]

It is widely accepted that ORAC is a useful method for assessing food extracts that contain various antioxidants. The principal aim of this study was to validate the ORAC assay. We first identified parameters that can interfere with the ORAC assay and we optimized it. Then, experiments were conducted to determine the limits of linearity and response function, to determine the accuracy profiles to circumvent some of the drawbacks of traditional validation procedures. Trueness, selectivity and limits of quantification of the method were also determined. Our objective of ORAC method validation is thus to give guarantees that most of the results generated during use of this method will be close enough to unknown true value of antioxidant capacity of food matrices. The validation results indicate that the described method will give accurate and reliable results for Trolox equivalent values ranging from 50 to 200 µmol/L. [less ▲]

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See detailAntioxidant capacity of small dark fruits. Influence of cultivars and harvest time
Kevers, Claire ULg; PINCEMAIL, Joël ULg; Defraigne, Jean-Olivier ULg et al

in Journal of Berry Research (2014), 4

BACKGROUND: Small dark fruits represent one of the most important sources of bioactive compounds with antioxidant capacity in the human diet. The content of health-promoting antioxidants in these fruits ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Small dark fruits represent one of the most important sources of bioactive compounds with antioxidant capacity in the human diet. The content of health-promoting antioxidants in these fruits may be important information to take into account when a fruit producer has to choose which cultivar to grow. OBJECTIVE: It is important to know how antioxidant capacity and antioxidant compounds as total phenolics and ascorbic acid vary between 9 small dark fruit species and for each species among cultivars (2 to 10 per species). METHODS: The antioxidant capacity (ORAC assay), total phenolic (Folin-Ciocalteu) and ascorbic acid content were measured in 9 fruits (plums, blackcurrants, blackberries, blueberries, cherries, redcurrants, raspberries, white currants and gooseberries) / 42 cultivars harvested at maturity during their high production period. RESULTS: The comparison of the average of the various cultivars of each small fruits showed that blackcurrants had the best antioxidant capacity (with plums), the highest ascorbic acid content and the highest total phenolic content (with blackberries). The present study shows that total phenolic compounds, ascorbic acid and antioxidant capacity strongly differed between genotypes of each small dark fruits. Other parameters as harvest time, culture conditions and maturity degree at the harvest may also influence the antioxidant capacity of small fruits. CONCLUSION: Among small dark fruits, blackcurrants have high qualities. Choices of variety, harvest time and maturity degree are important for all fruits. [less ▲]

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See detailANTIOXIDANT CAPACITY OF THREE CUBAN SPECIES OF THE GENUS Pluchea Cass. (Asteraceae)
Perera, Wilmer; Tabart, Jessica ULg; Gomez, Abel et al

in Journal of Food Biochemistry (2010), 34

Leaves of three Cuban species of the genus Pluchea: P. carolinensis, P. odorata and P. rosea were extracted with various solvents and analysed. Highest values of phenolic compounds were detected after ... [more ▼]

Leaves of three Cuban species of the genus Pluchea: P. carolinensis, P. odorata and P. rosea were extracted with various solvents and analysed. Highest values of phenolic compounds were detected after ethyl acetate (EtOAc) and n-butyl alcohol (n-BuOH) extractions. Flavonoids were detected after chloroform, EtOAc and n-BuOH extractions of the species Pluchea and three aglycone flavonol forms (quercetin, kaempferol and myricetin) were also quantified after EtOAc and n-BuOH extractions, using HPLC. The total antioxidant capacity (TAC), expressed as Trolox equivalents per gram of leaf dry weight (TE/g dw) was analyzed using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH•), 2,2’-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS∙+), and the oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC). The highest values of TAC were detected after EtOAc and n-BuOH extractions of the three species. P. carolinensis was the promising species; being the n-BuOH extraction with the most bioactive compounds : 15.3 mg TE/g dw using DPPH∙ [less ▲]

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See detailAntioxidant Defense and Free Radical Production in a Rabbit Model of Kidney Ischemia-Reperfusion
Franssen, Colette ULg; Defraigne, Jean-Olivier ULg; Detry, Olivier ULg et al

in Transplantation Proceedings (1995), 27(5), 2880-3

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See detailAntioxidant fractions and phenolic constituents from leaves of Pluchea carolinensis and Pluchea rosea
Perera Cordoba, Wilmer Hervet; Wauters, Jean-Noël ULg; Kevers, Claire ULg et al

in Free Radicals and Antioxidants (2014), 4(2), 1-7

Abstract: Objective: To evaluated the antioxidant potential of several polar fractions of P. carolinensis and P. rosea as well as pure chemicals, some of them quantified in both species by HPLC. Methods ... [more ▼]

Abstract: Objective: To evaluated the antioxidant potential of several polar fractions of P. carolinensis and P. rosea as well as pure chemicals, some of them quantified in both species by HPLC. Methods: The antioxidant potential of polar fractions and pure chemicals were assayed by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl and oxygen radical potential methods. The phenolic content was performed by using Folin–Ciocalteu’s reagent. Specific phenolic acids and flavonoids were quantified by DAD-RP-HPLC. Results: The highest DPPH antioxidant potential expressed in mg TE/gDE were frequently measured in fractions from n-butyl alcohol i.e 2 (192.1 ± 0.3); 6 (181.0 ± 0.1) of P. carolinensis and in fraction 7 (188.1 ± 5.5) of P. rosea while for ORAC (mg TE/gDE) assay fraction 2 (543.0 ± 64.6) and 4 (501.4 ± 49.7) of P. carolinensis and 3 (401.3 ± 16.1) and 6 (401.3 ± 16.1) of P. rosea showed the best results. Some flavonoids and phenolic acids were also assayed; all of them showed highest Oxygen radical absorbance capacity values. Conclusion: We report the antioxidant potential of polar fractions, as well as of some pure phenolics responsible of the antioxidant potential. Some phenolics were identified and quantified for the first time in both species. Apparently, caffeoylquinic acid derivatives contribute more significant to the total antioxidant potential of the extracts. [less ▲]

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See detailAntioxidant phenolic extracts obtained from secondary Tunisian date varieties (Phoenix dactylifera L.) by hydrothermal treatments
Mrabet, Abdessalem ULg; Jiménez-Araujo, Ana; Fernández-Bolaños, Juan et al

in Food Chemistry (2015), 196(2016), 917-924

Three common non-commercial Tunisian date varieties were treated by two thermal systems, obtaining a liquid fraction which was characterized and its antioxidant capacity determined. The concentration of ... [more ▼]

Three common non-commercial Tunisian date varieties were treated by two thermal systems, obtaining a liquid fraction which was characterized and its antioxidant capacity determined. The concentration of total phenols in the three varieties (Smeti, Garen Gazel, and Eguwa) was increased by steam explosion treatment up to 5311, 4680, and 3832 mg/kg of fresh dates, and their antioxidant activity up to 62.5, 46.5 and 43.1 mmol Trolox®/kg of fresh date, respectively. Both thermal treatments increased the content of phenolic acids. Additionally, a long scale study was carried out in a pilot plant, with steam treatment at 140 °C and 160 °C for 30 min. The liquid phase was extracted and fractionated chromatographically using adsorbent or ionic resins. The phenolic profiles were determined for each fraction, yielding fractions with interesting antioxidant activities with EC50 values of up to 0.08 mg/L or values of TEAC of 0.67 mmol Trolox®/g of extract. [less ▲]

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See detailAntioxidant potential of different plum cultivars during storage
MIHALACHE ARION, Cristina; TABART, Jessica; Kevers, Claire ULg et al

in Food Chemistry (2013), 146

Plums, the most commonly consumed fruits from Romania, are fruit rich in bioactive compounds like antioxidants. This research work was carried out to investigate the antioxidant potential of twelve plum ... [more ▼]

Plums, the most commonly consumed fruits from Romania, are fruit rich in bioactive compounds like antioxidants. This research work was carried out to investigate the antioxidant potential of twelve plum cultivars, fresh and stored during 10 days at 4°C by using different methods (DPPH, ORAC and erythrocyte resistance to haemolysis). The contents of total phenolic compounds and total anthocyanins were also determined by specific spectrometric methods. Significant differences between fresh and stored plum cultivars (p < 0.05) were found. Storage at 4°C resulted in an increase in antioxidant potential and anthocyanins content of the autumn plum varieties. Autumn plum varieties showed also a higher antioxidant capacity than summer varieties, as assessed by the ORAC and the haemolysis resistance assays. Our results suggest that even after storage plums could be a good source of antioxidants, which may provides health-promoting effects for humans. [less ▲]

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See detailAntioxidant power of phytochemicals from Psidium guajava leaf.
Qian, He; Nihorimbere, Venant ULg

in Journal of Zhejiang University. Science. B (2004), 5(6), 676-683

ried ground leaves of Psidium guajava L. (guava) were extracted by water and aqueous ethyl alcohol 50% (1:10) ratio, and the total phenolic content in the extracts was determined spectrophotometrically ... [more ▼]

ried ground leaves of Psidium guajava L. (guava) were extracted by water and aqueous ethyl alcohol 50% (1:10) ratio, and the total phenolic content in the extracts was determined spectrophotometrically according to Folin- Ciocalteu's phenol method and calculated as gallic acid equivalent (GAE). Remarkably high total phenolic content 575.3 +/-15.5 and 511.6+/-6.2 mg of GAE/g of dried weight material (for ethanol guava leaf extracts and water guava leaf extracts, respectively) were obtained. The antioxidant activity of lyophilized extracts was determined at ambient temperature by means of a 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydryzyl (DPPH*) colorimetry with detection scheme at 515 nm. The activity was evaluated by the decrease in absorbance as the result of DPPH* color change from purple to yellow. The higher the sample concentration used, the stronger was the free radical-scavenging effect. The results obtained showed that ascorbic acid was a substantially more powerful antioxidant than the extracts from guava leaf. On the other hand, the commercial guava leaf extracts and ethanol guava leaf extracts showed almost the same antioxidant power whereas water guava leaf extracts showed lower antioxidant activity. The parameter EC(50) and the time needed to reach the steady state to EC(50) concentration (T(EC(50))) affected the antiradical capacity of the sample. The antioxidant efficiency (AE) has been shown to be a more adequate parameter for selecting antioxidants than the widely used EC(50). This study revealed that guava leaf extracts comprise effective potential source of natural antioxidants. [less ▲]

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See detailThe antioxidant properties of non stroidal anti-inflammatory drugs
Henrotin, Yves ULg; Mouithys-Mickalad, Ange ULg; Mathy-Hartert, M et al

in Osteoarthritis and Cartilage (2000), 8

Detailed reference viewed: 33 (1 ULg)