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See detailAnti-inflammatory and chondroprotective activity of prodelphinidins isolated from Ribes nigrum leaves.
Tits, Monique ULg; de Leval, Xavier; Diercksens, Yves et al

Poster (2000)

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See detailAnti-Inflammatory and Immunological Effects of Centaurea Cyanus Flower-Heads
Garbacki, Nancy ULg; Gloaguen, Vincent; Damas, Jacques ULg et al

in Journal of Ethnopharmacology (1999), 68(1-3), 235-41

Centaurea cyanus flower-heads are used in European phytotherapy for the treatment of minor ocular inflammations. Different pharmacological experiments (inhibition of carrageenan, zymosan and croton oil ... [more ▼]

Centaurea cyanus flower-heads are used in European phytotherapy for the treatment of minor ocular inflammations. Different pharmacological experiments (inhibition of carrageenan, zymosan and croton oil-induced oedemas, inhibition of plasma haemolytic activity, induction of anaphylatoxin activity) showed that polysaccharides extracted from C. cyanus flower-heads had anti-inflammatory properties and interfered with complement. Moreover, these polysaccharides were found to be mainly composed of galacturonic acid, arabinose, glucose, rhamnose and galactose. [less ▲]

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See detailAnti-inflammatory effect of natural proanthocyanidins: pharmacological evaluation on in vivo models.
Garbacki, Nancy ULg; Tits, Monique ULg; Damas, Jacques ULg

in Pflügers Archiv : European Journal of Physiology (2003), 446

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See detailAnti-inflammatory effects of Centaurea cyanus (Asteraceae) flower-heads.
Garbacki, Nancy ULg; Gloaguen, Vincent; Damas, Jacques ULg et al

Poster (2001)

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See detailAnti-inflammatory effects of formoterol and ipratropium bromide against acute cadmium-induced pulmonary inflammation in rats.
Zhang, W.; Fievez, Laurence ULg; Cheu, Esteban ULg et al

in European Journal of Pharmacology (2010), 628(1-3), 171-178

In this study, the anti-inflammatory properties of formoterol and ipratropium bromide, alone or in combination, were investigated in a rat model of acute pulmonary inflammation induced by cadmium ... [more ▼]

In this study, the anti-inflammatory properties of formoterol and ipratropium bromide, alone or in combination, were investigated in a rat model of acute pulmonary inflammation induced by cadmium inhalation. Airway resistance and inflammatory responses, including matrix metalloproteinease-2 (MMP-2) and matrix metalloproteinease-9 (MMP-9) activities, were evaluated. Compared to values obtained in rats exposed to cadmium, pretreatment by bronchodilators administered alone significantly prevented the cadmium-induced increase of airway resistance. Formoterol elicited a significant decrease in total cell number, neutrophil and macrophage counts in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, whereas ipratropium bromide reduced neutrophil numbers. The two compounds administered alone significantly attenuated the lung lesions associated with parenchyma inflammatory cell influx and congestion observed in the cadmium group. The increased MMP-9 activity was significantly attenuated. Although only formoterol induced a decrease protein concentration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, both compounds inhibited the pulmonary edema by reducing wet-to-dry weight ratio which returned to values similar to those recorded in the sham group. All the effects of formoterol on the cadmium-induced inflammatory responses were reversed by propranolol. Similar anti-inflammatory effects were obtained in rats pretreated with ilomastat which showed a significant reduction on inflammatory cell infiltration and MMP-9 activity in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Neither synergistic nor additive effects were obtained when the two bronchodilators were administered in combination. In conclusion, formoterol and ipratropium bromide partially protect the lungs against the inflammation by reducing neutrophilic infiltration. This protective effect is associated with reduced MMP-9 activity known to play an important pro-inflammatory role in acute inflammatory process. [less ▲]

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See detailAnti-inflammatory effects of formoterol in rats after a single dose inhalation of nebulized cadmium
Zhang, W. H.; Fievez, Laurence ULg; Cheu, Esteban ULg et al

in Fundamental & Clinical Pharmacology (2007), 74

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See detailAnti-inflammatory effects of ipratropium bromide in rats with cadmium-induced acute pulmonary inflammation
Zhang, W.; Fievez, Laurence ULg; Cheu, Esteban ULg et al

in Proceedings of the 12th Annual Meeting of the French Society of Pharmacology and Therapeutics (2008)

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See detailAnti-inflammatory effects of ipratropium bromide in rats with cadmium-induced acute pulmonary inflammation
Zhang, Yinghong ULg; Fievez, Laurence ULg; Cheu, Esteban ULg et al

in Fundamental & Clinical Pharmacology (2008), 22(1), 7

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See detailAnti-inflammatory potency of the traditionally used antimalarial plant Fagraea fragrans
Jonville, Marie ULg; Baghdikian, Béatrice; Ollivier, Evelyne et al

in Planta Medica (2010, September), 76(12), 1171

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See detailAnti-inflammatory properties of capsular polymers from blue-green algae.
Garbacki, Nancy ULg; Gloaguen, Vincent; Damas, Jacques ULg et al

Conference (1999)

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See detailAnti-inflammatory properties of stigmasterol in cartilage: new insights
Gabay, Odile; Sanchez, Christelle ULg; Chevy, F. et al

Poster (2008)

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See detailAnti-inflammatory properties of stigmasterol in cartilage: new insights
Gabay, Odile; Sanchez, Christelle ULg; Chevy, F. et al

in Osteoarthritis and Cartilage (2008), 16(Suppl 4), 79

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See detailThe anti-invasive flavonoid (+)-catechin binds to laminin and abrogates the effect of laminin on cell morphology and adhesion
Bracke, M. E.; Castronovo, Vincenzo ULg; Van Cauwenberge, R. M. et al

in Experimental Cell Research (1987), 173(1), 193-205

To study the effect of the flavonoid (+)-catechin on cell-matrix interactions two cell types with a different morphology on and adhesion to laminin were used. MO4 virally transformed fetal mouse cells ... [more ▼]

To study the effect of the flavonoid (+)-catechin on cell-matrix interactions two cell types with a different morphology on and adhesion to laminin were used. MO4 virally transformed fetal mouse cells adhere and spread when cultured on top of laminin-coated coverslips or on human amnion basement membrane. M5076 mouse reticulum cell sarcoma cells poorly adhere to these substrates and remain round. Both cell types are invasive in confronting cultures with embryonic chick heart fragments. (+)-Catechin binds to laminin in a pH-dependent way. Pretreatment of laminin-coated coverslips or amnion basement membrane with 0.5 mM (+)-catechin abrogates the effect of laminin on cell morphology and adhesion. MO4 cells do not adhere to the pretreated substrates and remain round, while M5076 cells now adhere and spread. (+)-Catechin inhibits the invasion of MO4 cells but not of M5076 cells into embryonic chick heart in vitro. We speculate that the anti-invasive activity of the flavonoid to MO4 cells is the result of its interference with MO4 cell adhesion to laminin. Invasion of M5076 cells does not imply adhesion to and spreading on laminin. [less ▲]

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See detailAnti-invasive, antitumoral, and antiangiogenic efficacy of a pyrimidine-2,4,6-trione derivative, an orally active and selective matrix metalloproteinases inhibitor
Maquoi, Erik ULg; Sounni, Nor Eddine ULg; Devy, L. et al

in Clinical Cancer Research : An Official Journal of the American Association for Cancer Research (2004), 10(12, Pt 1), 4038-4047

Purpose: The implication of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in the major stages of cancer progression has fueled interest in the design of synthetic MMP inhibitors (MMPIs) as a novel anticancer therapy ... [more ▼]

Purpose: The implication of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in the major stages of cancer progression has fueled interest in the design of synthetic MMP inhibitors (MMPIs) as a novel anticancer therapy. Thus far, drugs used in clinical trials are broad-spectrum MMPIs the therapeutic index of which proved disappointingly low. The development of selective MMPIs for tumor progression-associated MMPs is, thus, likely to offer improved therapeutic possibilities. Experimental Design: The anti-invasive capacity of a series of pyrimidine-trione derivatives was tested in vitro in a chemoinvasion assay, and the most potent compound was further evaluated in vivo in different human tumor xenograft models. The activity of this novel selective MMPI was compared with BB-94, a broad-spectrum inhibitor. Results: Ro-28-2653, an inhibitor with high selectivity for MMP-2, MMP-9, and membrane type 1 (MT1)-MMP, showed the highest anti-invasive activity in vitro. In vivo, Ro-28-2653 reduced the growth of tumors induced by the inoculation of different cell lines producing MMPs and inhibited the tumor-promoting effect of fibroblasts on breast adenocarcinoma cells. Furthermore, Ro-28-2653 reduced tumor vascularization and blocked angiogenesis in a rat aortic ring assay. In contrast, BB-94 up-regulated MMP-9 expression in tumor cells and promoted angiogenesis in the aortic ring assay. Conclusion: Ro-28-2653, a selective and orally bioavailable MMPI with inhibitory activity against MMPs expressed by tumor and/or stromal cells, is a potent antitumor and antiangiogenic agent. In contrast to broad-spectrum inhibitors, the administration of Ro-28-2653 was not associated with the occurrence of adverse side effects that might hamper the therapeutic potential of these drugs. [less ▲]

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See detailAnti-laminin antibodies in Sprague-Dawley and brown Norway rats chronically exposed to cadmium.
Bernard, A.; Lauwerys, R.; Gengoux, P. et al

in Toxicology (1984), 31(3-4), 307-13

Sprague-Dawley and Brown-Norway female rats were chronically exposed to cadmium. The metal was administered either in drinking water at a concentration of 20 or 100 ppm for 13 months or intraperitoneally ... [more ▼]

Sprague-Dawley and Brown-Norway female rats were chronically exposed to cadmium. The metal was administered either in drinking water at a concentration of 20 or 100 ppm for 13 months or intraperitoneally (i.p.) at the dose of 1 mg/kg, 5 times a week for 4 months. Anti-laminin and anti-type IV procollagen antibodies (laminin and type IV procollagen are components of the glomerular basement membranes) were sequentially assessed by radioimmunoassay in serial serum samples. Anti-type IV procollagen antibodies were never detectable whereas anti-laminin antibodies were transiently found in the serum of Sprague-Dawley rats only. In the i.p. group, the antibodies were detected between week 4 and 8, whereas in the oral treatment group, they were detected between month 6 and 8. At the same time, the concentration of cadmium in kidney cortex averaged about 100 ppm in the 20 ppm cadmium group and about 200 ppm in the 2 other treatment groups. The pathogenic significance of these antibodies in chronic cadmium intoxication of Sprague-Dawley rats remains to be assessed since their occurrence was not associated with concomitant immunoglobulin deposits in the kidneys. [less ▲]

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See detailAnti-laminin antibodies in workers exposed to mercury vapour.
Lauwerys, R.; Bernard, A.; Roels, H. et al

in Toxicology Letters (1983), 17(1-2), 113-6

In 62 male workers exposed to mercury vapour for 5.5 years on average, the results of several renal parameters were not significantly different from those found in a well-matched control group (n = 60 ... [more ▼]

In 62 male workers exposed to mercury vapour for 5.5 years on average, the results of several renal parameters were not significantly different from those found in a well-matched control group (n = 60). Circulating anti-laminin antibodies were found, however, in 8 workers exposed to mercury vapour but in none of the control workers. These results suggest that occupational exposure to mercury vapour may lead to immune dysfunction in a certain percentage of the exposed population. Whether such a finding is predictive of the occurrence of an immune glomerulonephritis remains to be evaluated. [less ▲]

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See detailAnti-laminin receptor antibody targeting of liposomes with encapsulated doxorubicin to human breast cancer cells in vitro.
Rahman, A.; Panneerselvam, M.; Guirguis, R. et al

in Journal of the National Cancer Institute (1989), 81(23), 1794-800

The tumor cell laminin receptor is a cell-surface protein that binds laminin with high affinity (Kd = 1.0 nM). The putative ligand-binding domain of the laminin receptor has been molecularly cloned and ... [more ▼]

The tumor cell laminin receptor is a cell-surface protein that binds laminin with high affinity (Kd = 1.0 nM). The putative ligand-binding domain of the laminin receptor has been molecularly cloned and sequenced. In the present study, we used the predicted amino acid sequence of the laminin receptor to generate synthetic peptide antigens and produced immunoglobulin M (IgM) anti-laminin receptor monoclonal antibodies. The disulfide bond group of the IgM molecule was used to couple the antibodies to the surface of liposomes encapsulating doxorubicin. The anti-laminin receptor monoclonal antibodies coupled to the liposomes bound avidly to the surface of MDA-MB-435S (MDA-435) human breast carcinoma cells, which have high numbers of laminin receptors. These antibody-coupled liposomes exhibited a low degree of binding to Hs 578Bst (Hs 578) normal human breast epithelial cells, which express a low number of laminin receptors. Excess liposomes competed for the binding of unbound laminin to the tumor cell surface, and excess laminin competed for binding with the liposomes. Antibody-coupled liposomes encapsulating doxorubicin were specifically more efficient in inhibiting colony formation by MDA-435 cells in vitro than unbound doxorubicin or liposomes without anti-laminin receptor monoclonal antibodies. Unbound doxorubicin inhibited thymidine uptake by 10%-20% in both Hs 578 and MDA-435 cells, whereas the antibody-coupled liposomes encapsulating doxorubicin inhibited thymidine uptake by 90% in MDA-435 cells but only 15% in Hs 578 cells. Thus, use of anti-laminin receptor monoclonal antibodies coupled with liposomes encapsulating doxorubicin represents a new strategy for selective targeting of doxorubicin to carcinoma cells with exposed laminin receptors. [less ▲]

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See detailAnti-LFA-1 (CD11a) monoclonal antibody interferes with the induction of neonatal tolerance to alloantigens
Schurmans, Stéphane ULg; Gonzalez, A.; Revilla, C. et al

in European Journal of Immunology (1994), 24

The injection of (C57BL/6 x BALB/c)F1 spleen cells into newborn BALB/c mice results in the induction of a specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) tolerance to the alloantigens. On the contrary, alloreactive ... [more ▼]

The injection of (C57BL/6 x BALB/c)F1 spleen cells into newborn BALB/c mice results in the induction of a specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) tolerance to the alloantigens. On the contrary, alloreactive CD4+ T cells persist in the host and are still able to activate autoreactive F1 B cells to produce autoantibodies. This state of "split tolerance" is closely associated with the development of a lupus-like autoimmune syndrome. The LFA-1 integrin plays a relevant role in homing, intercellular adhesion and tranduction of co-stimulatory signals in leukocytes. Because of the beneficial effects of anti-LFA-1 monoclonal antibodies (mAb) treatment in various models of organ transplantation and autoimmune disease, we have investigated if such a treatment could interfere with the induction of neonatal tolerance or the development of the autoimmune syndrome in F1 cell-injected newborn mice. For this purpose, BALB/c mice neonatally injected with F1 cells were treated from day 1 up to day 15 with a non-cytotoxic anti-LFA-1 (CD11a) mAb. Anti-LFA-1 mAb treatment interfered with the persistence of a stable chimerism and with the establishment of CTL tolerance, as shown by rejection of allogeneic skin grafts and F1 B cells, and by a normal in vitro CTL activity against the corresponding alloantigens. As a consequence, these mice did not develop the characteristic autoimmune features seen in close association with an effective induction of CTL tolerance to alloantigens. These results stress the importance of the interactions between LFA-1 and its ligands during the neonatal induction of tolerance to alloantigens [less ▲]

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See detailAnti-Listerial Activity Of Bacteriocin-Producing Lactobacillus Curvatus Cwbi-B28 And Lactobacillus Sakei Cwbi-B1365 On Raw Beef And Poultry Meat
Dortu, C.; Huch, M.; Holzapfel, Wh. et al

in Letters In Applied Microbiology (2008), 47(6),

Aim: The study aimed to evaluate the effect of the bacteriocins produced by Lactobacillus sakei CWBI-B1365 and Lactobacillus curvatus CWBI-B28 on the growth and survival of Listeria monocytogenes in raw ... [more ▼]

Aim: The study aimed to evaluate the effect of the bacteriocins produced by Lactobacillus sakei CWBI-B1365 and Lactobacillus curvatus CWBI-B28 on the growth and survival of Listeria monocytogenes in raw beef and poultry meat. Methods and Results: The sakacin P and sakacin G structural genes were identified in Lact. curvatus CWBI-B28 and Lact. sakei CWBI-B1365 using PCR amplification, respectively. The effect of the two bacteriocinogenic strains either alone or together, and that of the nonbacteriocin-producing strain Lact. sakei LMG17302, on the growth of L. monocytogenes was evaluated in beef and poultry meat. In raw beef, the pathogenic bacteria were inhibited by the bacteriocinogenic strains. The bacteriocinogenic strains had no activity in raw chicken meat when inoculated separately, while they showed a clear anti-Listeria effect when applied together. Conclusion: Sakacin G producing Lact. sakei and sakacin P producing Lact. curvatus may be applied in raw beef to inhibit L. monocytogenes. In poultry meat, the inhibition of L. monocytogenes could only be achieved by a combined application of these bacteriocin-producing strains. Significance and Impact of the Study: In some meat products, the combined application of different class IIa bacteriocin producing lactic acid bacterium can enhance the anti-listerial activity. [less ▲]

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