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See detailLes antidépresseurs dans la dépression majeure: La dose a-t-elle de l'importance?
PITCHOT, William ULg

in Acta Psychiatrica Belgica (2013)

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See detailLes antidépresseurs du futur : rôle du système glutamatergique.
PITCHOT, William ULg; Scantamburlo, Gabrielle ULg; Ansseau, Marc ULg

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2011), 66(4), 195-198

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See detailAntidépresseurs et risque fracturaire
Bruyère, Olivier ULg

Scientific conference (2012, February 24)

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See detailAntidépresseurs et syndrome d'interruption
PITCHOT, William ULg

in Acta Psychiatrica Belgica (2013)

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See detailLes antidépresseurs
Ansseau, Marc ULg; PITCHOT, William ULg

in Rouillon, Fréderic (Ed.) Manuel de Psychiatrie (2012)

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See detailLes antidépresseurs.
Ansseau, Marc ULg; Pitchot, William ULg

in Guelfi, J. D.; Rouillon, F. (Eds.) Manuel de Psychiatrie (2007)

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See detailAntidiabetic agents: Potential anti-inflammatory activity beyond glucose control.
Scheen, André ULg; Esser, N.; Paquot, Nicolas ULg

in Diabetes & metabolism (2015)

A growing body of evidence is emerging to show that abdominal obesity, the metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and microvascular diabetic complications are intimately related to ... [more ▼]

A growing body of evidence is emerging to show that abdominal obesity, the metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and microvascular diabetic complications are intimately related to chronic inflammation. These observations pave the way to the development of new pharmacological strategies that aim to reduce silent inflammation. However, besides specific anti-inflammatory agents, glucose-lowering medications may also exert anti-inflammatory effects that could contribute to improved outcomes in diabetic patients. Most studies have used metformin, an AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activator, and thiazolidinediones (TZDs), which act as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARgamma) agonists. Both pharmacological classes (considered insulin-sparing agents or insulin sensitizers) appear to have greater anti-inflammatory activity than insulin-secreting agents such as sulphonylureas or glinides. In particular, TZDs have shown the widest range of evidence of lowered tissue (visceral fat and liver) and serum inflammation. In contrast, despite reducing postprandial hyperglycaemia, the effect of alpha-glucosidase inhibitors on inflammatory markers appears rather modest, whereas dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors (gliptins) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists appear more promising in this respect. These incretin-based therapies exert pleiotropic effects, including reports of anti-inflammatory activity. No human data are available so far regarding sodium-glucose cotransporter type 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors. Although they may have indirect effects due to reduced glucotoxicity, their specific mode of action in the kidneys does not suggest systemic anti-inflammatory activity. Also, in spite of the complex relationship between insulin and atherosclerosis, exogenous insulin may also exert anti-inflammatory effects. Nevertheless, for all these glucose-lowering agents, it is essential to distinguish between anti-inflammatory effects resulting from better glucose control and potential anti-inflammatory effects related to intrinsic actions of the pharmacological class. Finally, it would also be of major clinical interest to define what role the anti-inflammatory effects of these glucose-lowering agents may play in the prevention of macrovascular and microvascular diabetic complications. [less ▲]

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See detailAntidiabétiques oraux dans le traitement du diabète de type 2 : perspectives historique et médico-économique
SCHEEN, André ULg

in Médecine des Maladies Métaboliques (2015), 9(2), 186-197

Oral therapy of type 2 diabetes (T2D) is becoming increasingly complex during the last decade, with first the launch of glitazones, then that of gliptins and finally, very recently, that of gliflozins ... [more ▼]

Oral therapy of type 2 diabetes (T2D) is becoming increasingly complex during the last decade, with first the launch of glitazones, then that of gliptins and finally, very recently, that of gliflozins. However, the two oral glucose-lowering agents developed more than 50 years ago, metformin and sulfonylureas, still remain the leaders in the market. After failure of metformin monotherapy, the choice of antidiabetic medications is difficult and should be made taking into account the benefit-risk balance, with a special attention to cost of therapy and a focus on a patient-centered approach. This strategy is recommended in the recently updated joint ADA-EASD position statement, in January 2015. If the main principles of T2D therapy are universal, particularities should probably be discussed regarding regional situations, and the African continent obviously presents specificities in this respect. [less ▲]

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See detailLes antidotes en Médecine Vétérinaire
Delaunois, A.; Plume, Ch; Ansay, M. et al

in Annales de Médecine Vétérinaire (1997), 141

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See detailAntifracture efficacy and safety of once-yearly Zoledronic acid 5mg in men with osteoporosis: a prospective, randomized, controlled trial
Boonen, Steven; Su, Guoqin; Incera, Elodie et al

in Osteoporosis International (2011, March), 22(Suppl.1), 112

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See detailAntifracture efficacy of currently available therapies for postmenopausal osteoporosis.
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg

in Drugs (2011), 71(1), 65-78

Osteoporosis is a systemic bone disease characterized by low bone mass and bone mineral density, and deterioration of the underlying structure of bone tissue. These changes lead to an increase in bone ... [more ▼]

Osteoporosis is a systemic bone disease characterized by low bone mass and bone mineral density, and deterioration of the underlying structure of bone tissue. These changes lead to an increase in bone fragility and an increased risk for fracture, which are the clinical consequences of osteoporosis. The classical triad for consideration in osteoporosis is morbidity, mortality and cost. Vertebral fracture is an important source of morbidity in terms of pain and spinal deformity. On the other hand, hip fracture is associated with the worst outcomes and is widely regarded as a life-threatening event in the elderly; it is the source of the bulk of the cost of the disease in contemporary healthcare. The prevention of osteoporosis-associated fracture should include fall prevention, calcium supplementation and lifestyle advice, as well as pharmacological therapy using agents with proven antifracture efficacy. The most commonly used osteoporosis treatments in Europe are the bisphosphonates alendronate, risedronate, ibandronate and zoledronic acid; the selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) raloxifene; teriparatide; and strontium ranelate. Recent additions include the biological therapy denosumab and the SERM bazedoxifene. In this review, we explore the antifracture efficacy of these agents with the aim of simplifying treatment decisions. These treatments can be broadly divided according to their mode of action. The antiresorptive agents include the bisphosphonates, the SERMs and denosumab, while the bone-forming agents include parathyroid hormone and teriparatide. Strontium ranelate appears to combine both antiresorptive and anabolic activities. We collated data on vertebral and hip fracture efficacy from the pivotal 3-year phase III trials, all of which had a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled design. The relative reductions in risk in the osteoporosis trials range from 30% to 70% for vertebral fracture and 30% to 51% for hip fracture. This translates into 3-year number needed to treat values of between 9 and 21 for vertebral fracture and from 48 upwards for hip fracture. International guidelines agree that agents that have been shown to decrease vertebral, nonvertebral and hip fractures should be used preferentially over agents that only demonstrate vertebral antifracture efficacy. This is the case for alendronate, risedronate, zoledronic acid, denosumab and strontium ranelate. Finally, therapeutic decisions should be based on a balance between benefits and risks of treatment, which must be carefully considered in each particular case both by the physician and the patient. Indeed, no single agent is appropriate for all patients and, therefore, treatment decisions should be made on an individual basis, taking into account all measures of treatment effect and risk before making informed judgments about the best individual treatment option. [less ▲]

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See detailThe antifracture efficacy of ibandronate: a compendium of evidence.
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg

in Osteoporosis International (2009, March), 20(Suppl.1), 182-183

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See detailAntifungal activity of 2 lactic acid bacteria of the Weissella genus isolated from food
Ndagano, Dora; Lamoureux, Thibaut; Dortu, Carine et al

in Journal of Food Science (2011), 76(6), 305-311

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See detailAntifungal lipopeptides from B. subtilis induce defense-related phenolics in potato
Ongena, Marc ULg; Akpa, E.; Thonart, Philippe ULg et al

Poster (1999, May 04)

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See detailAntigen microencapsulation using a spray-drying technique
Zgouli, Slim; Grek, Vincent; Sabri, Ahmed ULg et al

Poster (1993, October)

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See detailAntigen microencapsulation using a spray-drying technique.
Zgoulli, S.; Gilsoul, J. J.; Gerard, J. et al

Poster (1993, October)

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See detailAntigen/antibody retention by follicular dendritic cells (FDC).
Radoux, D.; Heinen, Ernst ULg; Kinet-Denoel, C. et al

in Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology (1985), 186

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See detailAntigenic and Genomic Identity between Simian Herpesvirus Aotus Type 2 and Bovine Herpesvirus Type 4
Bublot, M.; Dubuisson, J.; Van Bressem, M. F. et al

in Journal of General Virology (The) (1991), 72((Pt 3)), 715-9

Herpesvirus aotus type 2 (HVA-2) was isolated from a culture of kidney cells from a healthy owl monkey (Aotus trivirgatus). Bovine herpesvirus type 4 (BHV-4) is frequently isolated from diseased and even ... [more ▼]

Herpesvirus aotus type 2 (HVA-2) was isolated from a culture of kidney cells from a healthy owl monkey (Aotus trivirgatus). Bovine herpesvirus type 4 (BHV-4) is frequently isolated from diseased and even healthy cattle and occasionally from sheep, wild ruminants and cats. The two viruses are related antigenically, as was revealed by an indirect fluorescent antibody test using polyclonal antisera from experimentally infected rabbits or monoclonal antibodies raised against six BHV-4 proteins, three of which were glycosylated. The genome structures of the two viruses consist of a unique central sequence flanked at both ends by G + C-rich tandem repeats. Restriction maps (produced using EcoRI, BamHI and HindIII) of these two viruses were nearly identical but the unique sequence of the HVA-2 genome possessed two additional BamHI sites. Four genomic regions of variable size were detected, two located in the unique part, one in the repetitive part and one in the left junction between the unique and the repeated part of the genome; these slight variations were similar to those observed between various BHV-4 isolates. These results suggest that HVA-2 and BHV-4 belong to the same virus species; HVA-2 could be either a BHV-4 contaminant of owl monkey kidney cell cultures or an isolate from an owl monkey accidentally infected with BHV-4. [less ▲]

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See detailAntigenic Variants Of Bovine Leukemia-Virus (Blv) Are Defined By Amino-Acid Substitutions In The Nh2 Part Of The Envelope Glycoprotein-Gp51
Portetelle, Daniel ULg; Couez, D.; Bruck, C. et al

in Virology (1989), 169(1),

Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) p24 gene was expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae under the control of the PHO5 (encoding repressible acid phosphatase, rAPase) promoter. Yeast cells were transformed by a ... [more ▼]

Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) p24 gene was expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae under the control of the PHO5 (encoding repressible acid phosphatase, rAPase) promoter. Yeast cells were transformed by a yeast-E. coli shuttle vector carrying the PHO5 promoter, the p24 gene and the CYC1 transcription terminator. After low inorganic phosphate (Pi) induction of the PHO5 promoter, p24 accumulated in the producing cells up to a concentration representing 10% of total soluble proteins. The expression level of p24 gene was not increased by insertion of the positive regulatory gene PHO4 on the p24 expression vector. The p24 produced in this system and incubated in crude yeast extract showed a remarkably high resistance to proteolytic degradation, a feature that presumably correlates with the compact globular conformation of the protein combined to the stabilizing effect of the N-terminal residue. [less ▲]

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