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See detailAnimal behavior
Buser, P.; Cook, L.; Giurgea, C. et al

in Bobon, D. P. (Ed.) The neuroleptics (1970)

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See detailAnimal circus: de dierenwereld in de poëzie van Hans Faverey
Dieu, Véronique ULg

Poster (2012, August)

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See detailL'animal dans le soin : entre théories et pratiques
Delfour, Fabienne ULg; Servais, Véronique ULg

in ANAE : Approche Neuropsychologique des Apprentissages chez l'Enfant (2012), 24 - tome II(117), 199-205

In this small form of clear text, we propose an argument that could allow our view to develop scientific research less mutilating and more fruitful in the vast area of the animal care. Having highlighted ... [more ▼]

In this small form of clear text, we propose an argument that could allow our view to develop scientific research less mutilating and more fruitful in the vast area of the animal care. Having highlighted and commented on the most prominent of the various oral and written presentations that are likely to contribute to this change, we discuss the merits of the use of anthropology and constructivist ethology in their situated perspective. What we propose involves three major changes from the previously dominant research traditions: a true recognition of the animal as a subject, the return of their voice to practitioners and the development of attentive and creative methods of observation and investigation. [less ▲]

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See detailL'animal et l'homme dans la Préhistoire
Otte, Marcel ULg; Noiret, Pierre ULg

Article for general public (2011)

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See detailL'animal et le temps
Richelle, Marc ULg; Lejeune, Helga ULg

in Fraisse, Paul (Ed.) Du temps biologique au temps psychologique (1979)

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See detailAnimal evolution — A fully-resolved phylogenomic tree argues against the Cambrian explosion hypothesis
Philippe, Hervé; Brinkmann, Henner; Baurain, Denis ULg

Poster (2006, March)

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See detailL'animal familier : médecin malgré lui ?
Servais, Véronique ULg

in Cahiers d'Ethologie (1989), 9(3), 375-406

The paper reviews the researches on the benefits of pets on human health and well being.

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See detailAnimal Health and Biodiversity – Preparing for the Future.
Linden, Annick ULg; Grégoire, Fabien

Conference (2011, February)

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See detailAnimal health and welfare: equivalent or complementary?
Nicks, Baudouin ULg; Vandenheede, Marc ULg

in Revue scientifique et technique - Office international des épizooties (2014), 33(1), 91-96

Reflexion about the concepts of "health" and "welfare", applied to domestic animals in comparison with humans.

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See detailThe animal laboratory as training resource
Dondelinger; Ghysels; Brisbois et al

Conference (1998)

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See detailAnimal model genetic evaluation of type traits for five dairy cattle breeds
Gengler, Nicolas ULg; Wiggans, G. R.; Wright, J. R.

in Journal of Dairy Science (1999), 82(6), 13501-135022

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See detailAnimal models of drug addiction: advantages and limitations
Quertemont, Etienne ULg

in Acta Neurologica Belgica (2006), 106

Various animal models have been developed to investigate the neurobiological and behavioral mechanisms of drug addiction. The most popular of these animal models include the locomotor sensitization ... [more ▼]

Various animal models have been developed to investigate the neurobiological and behavioral mechanisms of drug addiction. The most popular of these animal models include the locomotor sensitization paradigm, the place conditioning procedure and the self-administration technique. With these techniques, it is possible to mimic in rodents the major aspects of human drug addiction. The self-administration procedure is the most widely used and show an excellent natural and predictive validity. In the self-administration protocol, experimental animals, usually rats or mice, are allowed to press a lever in order to gain access to a small dose of an addictive drug. The drug may be given to the animal through the oral, the intravenous or the intracranial route of administration, according to the purpose of the study. In recent years, the classical self-administration procedure has been adapted to study the specific neurobiological basis of drug relapse. In this now called drug reinstatement paradigm, when drug self-administration behaviors are well established, an extinction procedure starts, during which lever pressing is no longer reinforced by drug access. After a number of such extinction sessions, lever pressing gradually declines and eventually stops. Drug-seeking behaviors are therefore said to be extinguished. It is then possible to test various stimuli in order to investigate whether they reinstate drug-seeking behaviors and use such a reinstatement as an animal model of drug relapse. Three types of stimuli have been shown to reinstate drug-seeking behaviors: a small priming dose of drug, drug-associated cues and a stressful stimuli. The effects of these three relapse-triggering stimuli are mediated by different neurobiological mechanisms, leading to the expectation that they may be targeted by different pharmacotherapeutic and behavioral interventions. Despite the high value of the current animal models of drug addiction, there show several limitations. In particular, it is difficult to differentiate between self-controlled and compulsive drug use in animals. As only uncontrolled compulsive drug consumption characterizes drug addiction in humans, such a limitation might explain the high frequency of false positive results in animal experiments. Indeed, it is common that therapeutic interventions successfully developed in animals later proved to be disappointing in humans. [less ▲]

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See detailAnimal models of migraine: looking at the component parts of a complex disorder
Bergerot, A.; Holland, P. R.; Akerman, S. et al

in European Journal of Neuroscience (2006), 24(6), 1517-1534

Animal models of human disease have been extremely helpful both in advancing the understanding of brain disorders and in developing new therapeutic approaches. Models for studying headache mechanisms ... [more ▼]

Animal models of human disease have been extremely helpful both in advancing the understanding of brain disorders and in developing new therapeutic approaches. Models for studying headache mechanisms, particularly those directed at migraine, have been developed and exploited efficiently in the last decade, leading to better understanding of the potential mechanisms of the disorder and of the action for antimigraine treatments. Model systems employed have focused on the pain-producing cranial structures, the large vessels and dura mater, in order to provide reproducible physiological measures that could be subject to pharmacological exploration. A wide range of methods using both in vivo and in vitro approaches are now employed; these range from manipulation of the mouse genome in order to produce animals with human disease-producing mutations, through sensitive immunohistochemical methods to vascular, neurovascular and electrophysiological studies. No one model system in experimental animals can explain all the features of migraine; however, the systems available have begun to offer ways to dissect migraine's component parts to allow a better understanding of the problem and the development of new treatment strategies. [less ▲]

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See detailAnimal Models of Mitral Regurgitation Induced by Mitral Valve Chordae Tendineae Rupture.
Leroux, Aurélia ULg; Moonen, Marie ULg; Pierard, Luc ULg et al

in Journal of Heart Valve Disease (The) (2012), 21

Background – Mitral regurgitation (MR) is a common valvular disease throughout the world. Various diagnostic techniques have been developed to assess the causes and severity of MR, and the therapeutic ... [more ▼]

Background – Mitral regurgitation (MR) is a common valvular disease throughout the world. Various diagnostic techniques have been developed to assess the causes and severity of MR, and the therapeutic approaches to this disease have been widely documented. However, treatments for chronic MR remain controversial, and various animal models of chronic MR (including chordae tendineae rupture, rapid pacing and ischemia) have been developed to study the pathophysiology and therapeutic approaches to this disease. The objective of this paper is to review the animal MR models that have been developed using a mitral valve chordae tendineae rupture technique. Animal models – Dogs and sheep have been the animals most commonly used in MR models induced by mitral valve chordae tendineae rupture, mainly due to considerations of cardiac size. Chordae tendineae cutting is performed using closed or open chest techniques. In the closed chest model, long flexible grasping forceps are positioned percutaneously in order to tear the mitral valve chordae. In the open chest model, cardiopulmonary bypass is performed and either selected chordae are cut under direct visualization, or a non specified number of chordae are cut using a metal device inserted through the left ventricular apex. Whatever the model used, MR has been found to become chronic 3 to 6 months after the induction of MR by chordae rupture. The reported mortality and complication rates of these models are high. Conclusion – In the long term, experimental evolution of chronic MR is similar to the evolution occurring naturally in patients suffering from chronic MR. These models could thus be useful in understanding the disease better and in testing new therapeutic modalities. This review summarizes the physiological effects of each of these techniques and compares the advantages and disadvantages of each procedure. [less ▲]

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See detailAnimal models of VZV infection
Sadzot-Delvaux, Catherine ULg; Rentier, Bernard ULg

in Gershon, Anne A.; Arvin, Ann M. (Eds.) Varicella-Zoster Virus : Virological and Clinical Management (2000)

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See detailAnimal noroviruses.
Scipioni, Alexandra ULg; Mauroy, Axel ULg; Vinje, J. et al

in Veterinary Journal (2008), 178(1), 32-45

Among enteric caliciviruses, noroviruses belong to the genus Norovirus, one of the four accepted genera in the family Caliciviridae. These single-stranded, positive-sense RNA viruses are highly variable ... [more ▼]

Among enteric caliciviruses, noroviruses belong to the genus Norovirus, one of the four accepted genera in the family Caliciviridae. These single-stranded, positive-sense RNA viruses are highly variable both genetically and antigenically. Several animal enteric caliciviruses that are morphologically indistinguishable and genetically closely related to human noroviruses have been identified. The first bovine enteric noroviruses were described in Great Britain and are known as Newbury Agent 2. At least three genetic clusters of porcine noroviruses join together within genogroup II noroviruses. Human noroviruses are the most important cause of acute gastroenteritis illness in people of all ages. In the USA, they are associated with approximately 30-50% of all food-borne outbreaks. Until now, noroviruses have not been associated with gastroenteritis outbreaks in immunocompetent animals. Neither bovine nor porcine noroviruses can replicate in cell culture, although human norovirus can grow in a complex 3D culture system. However, the recently discovered murine noroviruses can replicate in cell culture and are therefore used as model viruses to study human noroviruses. This review focusses on virus classification, virion structure, pathogenesis, epidemiology, immune response and diagnosis of animal noroviruses in comparison with human noroviruses. The classification of animal enteric caliciviruses within the Norovirus genus raises the question of whether transmission from an animal reservoir to humans could occur. Answering this question is important in determining the risk of cross-species infections affecting the epidemiology and evolution of these viruses and so complicating the control of human norovirus infections. [less ▲]

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See detailAnimal performance and nitrogen surplus in suckler cows pastures fertilised with mineral nitrogen fertilizer, pig slurry or cattle compost
Dufrasne, Isabelle ULg; Cabaraux, Jean-François ULg; Hornick, Jean-Luc ULg et al

in Land use systems in grassland dominated regions, 20th General Meeting of the European Grassland Federation (2004)

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See detailAnimal performance and nitrogen surplus in suckler cows pastures fertilised with mineral nitrogen fertilizer, pig slurry or cattle compost
Dufrasne, Isabelle ULg; Cabaraux, Jean-François ULg; Hornick, Jean-Luc ULg et al

in Land use systems in grassland dominated regions, Book of abstracts of 20th General Meeting of the European Grassland Federation (2004)

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See detailAnimal performance and sward characteristics in pasture grazed by heifers supplemented by different carbohydrates
Raskin, Pascale; Dufrasne, Isabelle ULg; Hornick, Jean-Luc ULg et al

in Book of abstracts of the 49th annual meeting of the European Association for Animal Production (1998)

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