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See detailImpacts of management strategies on nutrient fluxes in a temperate Picea abies (L. Karst) plantation
Carnol, Monique ULg

in Jansen, Jörg; Spiecker, Heinrich; von Teuffel, Konstantin (Eds.) Berichte Freiburger Forstliche Forschung, Heft 47, The question of conversion of coniferous forests, Abstracts, International Conference, 27 Septembre - 02 october, 2003, Freiburg im Breisgau, Germany (2003)

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See detailImpacts of occupant behaviours on residential heating consumption for detached houses in a temperate climate of the northern part of Europe
de Meester, Tatiana; Marique, Anne-Françoise ULg; De Herde, André et al

in Energy & Buildings (2013), 57

The occupants' behaviour has a great influence on the energy demand, management and consumption of a building. This paper investigates the influence of three parameters related to human behaviour through ... [more ▼]

The occupants' behaviour has a great influence on the energy demand, management and consumption of a building. This paper investigates the influence of three parameters related to human behaviour through their modes of occupations (based on family size, management of the heating system and management of the heated area) on the housing heating loads of a standard dwelling in Belgium. Seven levels of insulation were tested: no insulation, two intermediate levels corresponding to 3 and 6 cm of insulation, the current standard for new buildings in Belgium, the low energy standard, the very low energy standard and the passive house standard. Multi-zone simulations were performed with a dynamic thermal simulation software. The impact of occupants' lifestyle and the interactions between occupation modes and insulation levels are highlighted. These results prove that the more the building is insulated, the more the lifestyle proportionally influences the heating loads. One important strategy for reducing heating consumption during the whole life cycle of the building is adapting the size of the house and its occupation modes to the evolution of family size. However, insulation is paramount, and increasing the insulation of the house provides generally better results than merely adapting the occupation mode. [less ▲]

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See detailImpacts of past Human disturbances on present day tree species assembly in the tropical forests of South-East Cameroon
Vleminckx, Jason; Doucet, Jean-Louis ULg; Daïnou, Kasso ULg et al

Poster (2013, June 25)

Non-random spatial distribution of trees is the result of both neutral and deterministic factors. Neutral models suggest that species within a community are equally competitive, with spatial structures ... [more ▼]

Non-random spatial distribution of trees is the result of both neutral and deterministic factors. Neutral models suggest that species within a community are equally competitive, with spatial structures mainly due to dispersal limitation. Deterministic (or non-neutral) models consider species assemblages as the result of what we name “induced spatial dependence”, where forcing (explanatory) variables shape diversity organization. However, deterministic models have often included habitat variables only, without considering human disturbance which we know enhances the competitive advantage of heliophytic (light-demanding) species and therefore the floristic composition of phytocenoses. Based on charcoal abundance in the soil (used as an indicator of anthropogenic perturbation), species abundance, and environmental data from a forest of south-east Cameroon, we applied modern variation partitioning methods to assess the relative impact of human disturbance on floristic patterns, controlling for purely spatial and habitat effects. Significant signals of human influence have been found so far, and a new collection of data should establish with a better precision the importance of the anthropogenic impact on tree species assemblages. [less ▲]

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See detailImpacts of past Human disturbances on present-day tree species assembly in a tropical forest of South-East Cameroon
Vleminckx, Jason; Doucet, Jean-Louis ULg; Daïnou, Kasso ULg et al

Poster (2013, November 06)

Many evidence have been found for intensive past Human presence in the forests of Central Africa, notably widespread charcoal occurrence in the soil. Forest clearing for slash-and-burn agriculture may ... [more ▼]

Many evidence have been found for intensive past Human presence in the forests of Central Africa, notably widespread charcoal occurrence in the soil. Forest clearing for slash-and-burn agriculture may have favored the competitiveness of light-demanding species (LD) to the detriment of shade-bearer species (SB). Hypothesis: Positive correlation between abundance of charcoal in the soil (proxy for past Human clearing) and abundance of LD.Mostly “young” charcoals were thought to reflect past Human disturbances that would have shaped present-day species assembly. However, CAI 0-20cm and CAI 20-100cm were highly correlated with each other (r-Pearson = 0.55; P<0.001) and both displayed positive correlations with Non-Pioneer LD abundance (significant with a classic test) and negative correlations with SB abundance. Although this observation is coherent with our hypothesis, significance disappeared when correcting for spatial autocorrelation [4], even after removing small-diameter trees potentially too young to be linked with last Human disturbances (not shown). Correlation of CAI between the two soil layers => Humans found appropriate conditions for settlement in the same area at different periods? Absence of significant correlation in ❸ (i) Last Human disturbances are too old to detect any signal on present-day tree species assembly. (ii) Human impact is weak compared to other factors (soil properties, dispersal limitation,…) (iii) Local scale heterogeneity of LD abundance is weak compared to landscape scale. Parallel large scale gradients in the abundance of Non-Pioneer LD and charcoal abundance (proxy for past slash-and-burn activities) were observed, but a causal link cannot be established so far. [less ▲]

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See detailImpacts of Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria on Wheat Growth under Greenhouse and Field Conditions
Nguyen, Minh ULg; du Jardin, Patrick ULg; Jijakli, Haissam ULg et al

Poster (2015, June 16)

Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR) are well-known on stimulating root growth, enhancing mineral availability, and nutrient use efficiency in crops, and therefore become promising tool for ... [more ▼]

Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR) are well-known on stimulating root growth, enhancing mineral availability, and nutrient use efficiency in crops, and therefore become promising tool for sustainable agriculture. The aim of this project is to screen PGPR strains to enhance wheat growth and yield in combination with an optimised nitrogen (N) fertilizer dose, and thus finally reduce the use of N fertilizer with equivalent yield as the recommended N dose. A list of PGPR has been collected, including (1) Mix1 (a mix of Azospirillum sp., Azorhizobium sp., and Azoarcus sp.), (2) Mix2 (a mix of Mix1 plus with two strains phosphorus-solubilizing Bacillus sp.), (3) Bacillus amyloliquefaciens a, (4) Bacillus subtilis, and (5) Bacillus amyloliquefaciens b. The PGPR were screened in both greenhouse and field condition 2014. There was significant increase in root dry weight and in root per shoot ratio of plants inoculated with Mix1 in the greenhouse. Under field condition, besides the first factor PGPR, an additional factor, i.e. four N fertilizer doses, was applied in the combination with PGPR. Without or at low N fertilizer doses, the results showed that the grain yield declined significantly. The highest grain yield increase was fifteen per cent above the control and achieved by inoculating Bacillus subtilis without application of N fertilizer. However, there was statistically insignificant in all treatments due to variability between plot replicates. Based on these results, a modified protocol plus new strategies for PGPR selection has been built up for 2015 trial to reduce the influence of variability on field and possibly achieve the higher yield increase. [less ▲]

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See detailImpacts of Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria-based Biostimulants on Wheat Growth under Greenhouse and Field Conditions
Nguyen, Minh ULg; Ongena, Marc ULg; Colinet, Gilles ULg et al

Poster (2015, November 16)

Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR) are one of the main biostimulant classes due to their capacity of stimulating root growth and enhancing soil mineral availability, hence increasing nutrient use ... [more ▼]

Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR) are one of the main biostimulant classes due to their capacity of stimulating root growth and enhancing soil mineral availability, hence increasing nutrient use efficiency in crops. The aim of this study is to screen commercially PGPR-containing products to enhance wheat growth and yield in combination with an optimized nitrogen (N) fertilizer application scheme. This could lead to a significant reduction of N fertilizer application without affecting the subsequent grain yields. The screened products collection includes (1) Mix1 (a mix of Azospirillum sp., Azorhizobium sp., and Azoarcus sp.), (2) Mix2 (a mix of Mix1 complemented with two strains of phosphorus-solubilizing Bacillus sp.), (3) Bacillus amyloliquefaciens a, (4) B. subtilis, and (5) B. amyloliquefaciens b. These biostimulants were screened under greenhouse and field conditions in 2014 by using spring and winter wheat varieties respectively. There was a significant increase in root dry weight and in root per shoot ratio of plants inoculated with Mix1. Under field conditions, the interaction between PGPR inoculation and N fertilizer application was assessed. The grain yield was negatively impacted by low N fertilizer applications. Under such conditions, the inoculation of the wheat rhizosphere with Bacillus subtilis increased the grain yield by 15% relative to the water control. However, in the field trial, the variability between plot replicates was high and lead to non-significant results. Based on those results, modified screening strategies for PGPR selection were set up for the 2015 trials to reduce field variability and possibly achieve higher yield increases. [less ▲]

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See detailImpacts of plant invasions on ecosystem processes in Belgium
Vanderhoeven, Sonia ULg; Chapuis-Lardy, L.; Dassonville, N. et al

Poster (2004)

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See detailImpacts of the carbonyl group location of ester bond on interfacial properties of sugar-based surfactants: experimental and computational evidences
Razafindralambo, Hary ULg; Blecker, Christophe ULg; Mezdour, Samir et al

in Journal of Physical Chemistry B (2009), 113

Interfacial properties of surfactants are dependent on the conformation adopted by the hydrophilic headgroup or/and the hydrophobic tail at the boundary limit of two immiscible phases. Here, we ... [more ▼]

Interfacial properties of surfactants are dependent on the conformation adopted by the hydrophilic headgroup or/and the hydrophobic tail at the boundary limit of two immiscible phases. Here, we demonstrate the impacts of the carbonyl group (-CO-) location of the ester bond of sugar-based surfactants by comparing some properties of two closely related esters, octyl glucuronate and glucose octanoate, at the air-water interface. The carbonyl group location influences the rate and extent of interfacial adsorption and the rheology properties of sugar esters at the air-water interface, which were evaluated by dynamic surface tension and complex surface viscoelastic measurements. Octyl glucuronate adsorbs the fastest at the air-water interface whereas glucose octanoate reduces the dynamic surface tension at the lowest value and exhibits the highest film viscoelasticity. Differences are attributed to molecular conformation constraints inducing relevant changes to the surface coverage kinetic capacity and the interaction strengths of the octyl sugar ester adsorbed films at the air-water interface. All of the results are supported by the minimum cross-sectional area values per molecule determined by both experimental and computational approaches. [less ▲]

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See detailImpacts of underwater noise on marine vertebrates: Project introduction and first results
Liebschner, Alexander; Seibel, Henrike; Teilmann, Jonas et al

in Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology (2015), 875

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See detailImpacts of unusually high sea ice cover on Antarctic coastal benthic food web structure
Michel, Loïc ULg; Dubois, Philippe; Eleaume, Marc et al

Conference (2016, April 08)

Antarctica currently undergoes strong and contrasted impacts linked with climate change. While the West Antarctic Peninsula is one of the most rapidly warming regions in the world, resulting in sea ice ... [more ▼]

Antarctica currently undergoes strong and contrasted impacts linked with climate change. While the West Antarctic Peninsula is one of the most rapidly warming regions in the world, resulting in sea ice cover decrease, the sea ice cover of East Antarctica unexpectedly tends to increase, possibly in relation with changes in atmospheric circulation. Changes in sea ice cover are likely to influence benthic food web structure through modifications of benthic-pelagic coupling, disruption of benthic production and/or modifications of benthic community structure (i.e. resource availability for benthic consumers). Here, we studied shallow (0-20 m) benthic food web structure on the coasts of Petrels Island (Adélie Land, East Antarctica) during an event of unusually high spatial and temporal (two successive austral summers without seasonal break-up) sea ice cover. Using stable isotope ratios of C, N and S and the SIAR mixing model, we examined importance of several organic matter sources (benthic macroalgae, benthic biofilm, sympagic algae, suspended particulate organic matter and penguin guano) for nutrition of over 20 taxa of benthic invertebrates (sponges, sea anemones, nemerteans, sessile and mobile polychaetes, gastropods, bivalves, sipunculids, pycnogonids, amphipods, sea stars, sea urchins and sea cucumbers) spanning most present functional guilds. Our results provide insights about how Antarctic benthic consumers, which have evolved in an extremely stable environment, might adapt their feeding habits in response to sudden man-driven changes in environmental conditions and trophic resource availability. [less ▲]

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See detailImpacts of vegetation changes on LGM climate
Henrot, Alexandra ULg; François, Louis ULg; Munhoven, Guy ULg

Conference (2007, March 12)

The impacts of vegetation change on the climate at the Last Glacial Maximum are investigated with the Earth System Model of Intermediate Complexity Planet Simulator and the dynamic vegetation model Caraib ... [more ▼]

The impacts of vegetation change on the climate at the Last Glacial Maximum are investigated with the Earth System Model of Intermediate Complexity Planet Simulator and the dynamic vegetation model Caraib (CARbon Assimilation in the Biosphere). [less ▲]

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See detailImpacts of wheel traffic on the physical properties of a Luvisol under reduced and conventional tillage
Saur, Marie-Laure ULg; Destain, Marie-France ULg; Roisin, Christian et al

Poster (2016)

Soil compaction is a complex mechanism which results in a decrease of soil porosity and an increase of soil strength. Such effects may reduce crop yield since they are harmful for root growth, germination ... [more ▼]

Soil compaction is a complex mechanism which results in a decrease of soil porosity and an increase of soil strength. Such effects may reduce crop yield since they are harmful for root growth, germination, mesofauna and bacterial life. Soil compaction may also reduce hydraulic conductivity which increases the risk of runoff, contamination of surface water, erosion and emission of greenhouse gases due to anaerobic processes. In the context of sustainable agriculture, it is crucial to characterise the impact of the agricultural techniques on the compaction state in the arable layer due to machine traffic. For this purpose, Soil samples were taken in a Luvisol at different depths, on plots under longterm reduced tillage (RT) and conventional tillage (CT). The impact of wheel traffic on the physical properties of the soils was also studied. The experimental approach consists in measuring traditional macroscopic soil properties such as bulk density and precompression stress, and combining them with pore size distribution obtained by mercury intrusion porosimetry. Automatic cone index measurements were initially performed to map the soil resistance and easily identify the sampling depths. The measurements revealed a plough pan at 30-cm depth under both CT and RT. Nevertheless, the subsoil under RT showed pieces of evidence of a natural regeneration process of the microporosity. The impact of wheel traffic was studied in RT and CT plots. It was shown that the passage of heavy machine such as beet harvester coupled to water content close to the optimum proctor is clearly unfavourable in terms of compaction. The measurements revealed large modifications of soil structure in the topsoil of CT, whereas the soil structure slightly changes through depth. However, the latter remains the more problematic case since the soil will not be loosened by tillage anymore, resulting in strongly compacted soil years after years. In addition to the experimental approach, numerical modelling was used in order to predict the soil compaction. A finite element method was used and the soil behaviour was modelled by an elastoplastic law (modified Cam-Clay model). The model parameters were calibrated from the experimental measurements. The simulations allowed to compare the porosity and the surface deformation after wheel traffic with the experiments. The variations of machine weight and tyre pressure were numerically studied and it was showed that the machine weight has an influence in the topsoil and the subsoil, whereas the tyre pressure affects only the topsoil. [less ▲]

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