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See detailIncreased Cell Proliferation and Mucocyte Density in the Sea Anemone Aiptasia pallida Recovering from Bleaching
Fransolet, David ULg; Roberty, Stéphane ULg; Herman, Anne-Catherine et al

in PLoS ONE (2013), 8(5), 65015

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See detailIncreased cell proliferation in Seriatopora hystrix following heat-induced bleaching
Fransolet, David ULg; Ugille, Aurélie; Leblud, Julien et al

Poster (2012, July)

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See detailIncreased Cell Proliferation, But Not Reduced Cell Death, Induces Lymphocytosis In Bovine Leukemia Virus-Infected Sheep
Debacq, C.; Asquith, B.; Kerkhofs, P. et al

in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2002), 99(15),

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See detailIncreased cell proliferation-but not reduced cell death-induces lymphocytosis in Bovine Leukaemia Virus-infected sheep
Debacq, Christophe; Asquith, B.; Kerkhofs, Pierre et al

in Abstracts of papers presented at the 2002 meeting of retroviruses (2002, May)

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See detailIncreased cerebral functional connectivity underlying the antinociceptive effects of hypnosis
Faymonville, Marie-Elisabeth ULg; Roediger, Laurence ULg; Del Fiore, Guy et al

in Cognitive Brain Research (2003), 17(2), 255-262

The neural mechanisms underlying the antinociceptive effects of hypnosis are not well understood. Using positron emission tomography (PET), we recently showed that the activity in the anterior cingulate ... [more ▼]

The neural mechanisms underlying the antinociceptive effects of hypnosis are not well understood. Using positron emission tomography (PET), we recently showed that the activity in the anterior cingulate cortex (midcingulate area 24a') covaries with the hypnosis-induced reduction of affective and sensory responses to noxious thermal stimulation [Faymonville et al., Anesthesiology 92 (2000) 1257-1267]. In the present study, we assessed changes in cerebral functional connectivity related to the hypnotic state, compared to simple distraction and the resting state. Nineteen highly hypnotizable right-handed volunteers were studied using (H2O)-O-15-PET. The experimental conditions were hot noxious or warm non-noxious stimulation of the right hand during resting state, mental imagery and hypnotic state. Using a psychophysiological interaction analysis, we identified brain areas that would respond to noxious stimulations under the modulatory action of the midcingulate cortex in, and only in, the hypnotic state. Hypnosis, compared to the resting state, reduced pain perception by 50%. Pain perception during rest and mental imagery was not significantly different. Analysis of PET data showed that the hypnotic state, compared to normal alertness (i.e., rest and mental imagery), significantly enhanced the functional modulation between midcingulate cortex and a large neural network encompassing bilateral insula, pregenual anterior cingulate cortex, pre-supplementary motor area, right prefrontal cortex and striatum, thalamus and brainstem. These findings point to a critical role for the midcingulate cortex in the modulation of a large cortical and subcortical network underlying its influence on sensory, affective, Cognitive and behavioral aspects of nociception, in the specific context of hypnosis. (C) 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailIncreased concanavalin A-binding capacity of immunoglobulin G purified from sera of patients with rheumatoid arthritis
Malaise, Michel ULg; Franchimont, P.; Bouillene, C. et al

in Clinical & Experimental Immunology (1987), 68(3), 543-551

A solid phase radioimmunoassay was set up for direct measurement of the binding capacity of human IgG to three lectins recognizing different carbohydrates of the Fc domain, i.e. peanut agglutinin (PNA ... [more ▼]

A solid phase radioimmunoassay was set up for direct measurement of the binding capacity of human IgG to three lectins recognizing different carbohydrates of the Fc domain, i.e. peanut agglutinin (PNA), Concanavalin A (Con A) and pokeweed mitogen (PWM) which mainly bind to beta-galactose, alpha-mannose and dimers of N-acetyl-beta-glucosamine respectively. The mean specific binding of the 96 normal IgG tested to PNA and to PWM was statistically higher (P less than 0.001) than that to Con A, whereas no significant differences were observed between the mean specific bindings to PNA and to PWM. A statistically significant linear negative correlation could be established only between the relative bindings (expressed in percentage of the total binding to the three lectins) to PNA and to PWM (r = -0.65, P less than 0.001). The mean specific binding of IgG purified from 34 patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis (RA) to PNA and to Con A was statistically higher (P less than 0.001) than that reached with PWM, whereas no significant differences were noted between their mean binding capacities to PNA and to Con A. When compared to normal IgG, only four out of 34 RA IgG exhibited a significantly higher binding capacity to PNA, whereas all but one RA IgG possessed a significantly higher binding capacity to Con A. Accordingly, the mean specific binding of RA IgG to Con A was significantly higher than that of normal IgG (P less than 0.001). Besides (and contrary to normal IgG), a statistically significant negative linear correlation was noted between the relative bindings of RA IgG to PNA and to Con A (r = -0.89, P less than 0.001). All the five RA IgG tested exhibited an abnormal circular dichroism. Our data suggest that, by altered steric conformation and glycosylation, mannosyl-residues of RA IgG become prominent or terminal or both, and are therefore able to react more effectively with Con A than normal IgG do. [less ▲]

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See detailIncreased dioxin/PCB body burden in diabetics: findings in a population-based study in Belgium
Fierens, S.; Mairesse, H.; Heilier, H. et al

in Organohalogen Compounds (2003), 60-65

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See detailIncreased electron donor and electron acceptor characters enhance the adhesion between oil droplets and cells of Yarrowia lipolytica as evaluated by a new cytometric assay
Aguedo, Mario ULg; Waché, Y.; Mazoyer, V. et al

in Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry (2003), 51(10), 3007-3011

The adhesion of methyl ricinoleate droplets to cells of the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica was investigated. A new cytometric method, relying on the double staining of fatty globules with Nile Red and of cells ... [more ▼]

The adhesion of methyl ricinoleate droplets to cells of the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica was investigated. A new cytometric method, relying on the double staining of fatty globules with Nile Red and of cells with Calcofluor, enabled us to quantify methyl ricinoleate droplet adhesion to cells precultured on a hydrophilic or on a hydrophobic carbon source. In this last case, droplet adsorption was enhanced and a MATS (microbial adhesion to solvents) test revealed that this increase was due to Lewis acid-base interactions and not to an increase in the hydrophobic properties of the cell surface. These preliminary results demonstrate that the developed cytometric method is promising for various applications concerning the study of interactions between microorganisms and an emulsified hydrophobic substrates. [less ▲]

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See detailIncreased Expression of Bone Sialoprotein in Bone Metastases Compared with Visceral Metastases in Human Breast and Prostate Cancers
Waltregny, David ULg; Bellahcene, Akeila ULg; de Leval, Xavier et al

in Journal of Bone and Mineral Research (2000), 15(5), 834-43

The recent demonstration that bone sialoprotein (BSP) is expressed in osteotropic cancers suggests that this bone matrix protein might be implicated in the preferential seed and growth of metastatic cells ... [more ▼]

The recent demonstration that bone sialoprotein (BSP) is expressed in osteotropic cancers suggests that this bone matrix protein might be implicated in the preferential seed and growth of metastatic cells in bone. High expression of BSP in breast and prostate primary carcinomas is associated with progression and bone metastases development. The exact mechanisms by which BSP may favor bone metastases formation are not clearly established yet. Although BSP expression has been detected in breast, prostate, lung, thyroid, and neuroblastoma primary tumors, no information regarding its expression in metastases is available to date. In this study, we have examined BSP expression in 15 bone and 39 visceral metastatic lesions harvested from 8 breast cancer patients and 7 prostate cancer patients who died of disseminated disease. We were able to retrieve the primary lesions from 5 of the 8 breast cancer patients as well as from all 7 prostate cancer patients. All the primary breast tumor patients and 5 of the 7 primary prostate cancer patients expressed a detectable level of BSP. Bone metastases from all 8 breast cancer patients and from 5 out of 7 prostate cancer patients exhibited detectable levels of the protein. Metastatic cells in close contact with bone trabeculae usually were highly positive for BSP. BSP also was detected in secondary lesions developed at visceral sites including liver, thyroid, lung, and adrenal glands. However, BSP expression was significantly lower in visceral metastases than in skeletal ones (Mann-Whitney test, p < 0.05). Our data represent the first demonstration of an increased expression of BSP in bone metastases compared with nonskeletal metastases in human breast and prostate cancers and add weight to the body of evidence attributing a significant role to this protein in the genesis of bone metastases. [less ▲]

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See detailIncreased Expression of Galectin-1 in Carcinoma-Associated Stroma Predicts Poor Outcome in Prostate Carcinoma Patients
van den Brule, Frederic; Waltregny, David ULg; Castronovo, Vincenzo ULg

in Journal of Pathology (The) (2001), 193(1), 80-7

Galectin-1, a member of the beta-galactoside-binding galectin family, is a pleiotropic dimeric protein participating in a variety of normal and pathological processes, including cancer progression ... [more ▼]

Galectin-1, a member of the beta-galactoside-binding galectin family, is a pleiotropic dimeric protein participating in a variety of normal and pathological processes, including cancer progression. Modulation of the interactions with the basement membrane glycoprotein laminin and induction of apoptosis in activated T lymphocytes are well-known functions of this galectin. In this study, the expression of galectin-1 was examined in 148 human primary prostate carcinoma samples. Immunohistochemical staining of paraffin sections of prostate tissues revealed that galectin-1 was not detected in normal, PIN (prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia) or carcinoma cells, but accumulated in the stroma and associated fibroblasts. Galectin-1 expression was significantly increased in the tumour-associated stroma compared with the non-neoplastic gland-associated stroma in 21.3% of the cases (Mantel-Haenszel test, p=0.001; Wilcoxon signed rank test, p<0.0001). Increased galectin-1 expression in the cancer-associated stroma compared to the normal gland-associated stroma (p=0.03) was identified by multivariate analysis as a strong independent predictor of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) recurrence, just after the pathological stage (p<0.0001). The association between accumulation of galectin-1 in the stroma of the malignant tissue and aggressiveness of the tumour adds weight to the body of evidence that identifies a role for galectin-1 in the acquisition of the invasive phenotype. In addition to modulating cancer cell interactions with laminin, galectin-1 accumulated around the cancer cells may act as an immunological shield by inducing activated T-cell apoptosis. This exciting hypothesis warrants further investigation. [less ▲]

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See detailIncreased expression of Galectin-1 in carcinoma-associated stroma predicts poor outcome in prostate carcinoma patients
van den Brule, Frédéric; Waltregny, David ULg; Castronovo, Vincenzo ULg

in Proceedings of the American Association for Cancer Research (2000), 41

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See detailIncreased Expression of mRNA Encoding Ferritin Heavy Chain in Brain Structures of a Rat Model of Absence Epilepsy
Lakaye, Bernard ULg; de Borman, B.; Minet, Arlette ULg et al

in Experimental Neurology (2000), 162(1), 112-20

Differential mRNA display was carried out to find genes that are differentially regulated in the brain of a rat strain with absence epilepsy, the genetic absence epilepsy rats from Strasbourg (GAERS ... [more ▼]

Differential mRNA display was carried out to find genes that are differentially regulated in the brain of a rat strain with absence epilepsy, the genetic absence epilepsy rats from Strasbourg (GAERS). Among the 32 differentially displayed cDNA fragments actually cloned and sequenced, one shows 100% identity with the rat heavy chain ferritin (H-ferritin) mRNA. Northern blot analysis confirmed the up-regulation of the H-ferritin mRNA. Using dot blotting, a 40% increase in expression was reported in the subcortical forebrain of the adult GAERS, while cortex, brain stem, and cerebellum appeared unmodified. This change was not observed in the brain of 25-day-old rats, an age at which the epileptic phenotype is not present. By in situ hybridization, the enhanced expression was localized in the hippocampus. The increase in mRNA encoding H-ferritin was not immunodetected at the protein level by Western blotting. These results are not apparently related to the neural substrate of SWD or to the distribution of local increase in glucose metabolism previously described in the GAERS. It is hypothesized that the up-regulation of the H-ferritin mRNA is part of a mechanism protecting the hippocampus, a seizure-prone area, against a possible overactivation during absence seizures. [less ▲]

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See detailIncreased Expression of Osteonectin and Osteopontin, Two Bone Matrix Proteins, in Human Breast Cancer
Bellahcene, Akeila ULg; Castronovo, Vincenzo ULg

in American Journal of Pathology (1995), 146(1), 95-100

Microcalcifications are a common phenomenon associated with breast cancer and are often the only mammographic sign of a malignant breast disease. Although microcalcifications are not restricted to breast ... [more ▼]

Microcalcifications are a common phenomenon associated with breast cancer and are often the only mammographic sign of a malignant breast disease. Although microcalcifications are not restricted to breast cancer and can be also associated with benign lesions, it is noteworthy that they are composed exclusively of hydroxyapatite in breast carcinoma. Hydroxyapatite is the bone-associated phosphocalcic crystal the deposition of which in bone tissue requires the coordinated expression of several molecules such as osteonectin (OSN) and osteopontin (OPN), synthesized by cells of the osteoblastic lineage. In this study, we evaluated the expression of these two bone matrix proteins, using an immunoperoxidase technique and specific antibodies, in 79 breast lesions including 28 benign and 51 cancerous specimens. We found that normal mammary tissue associated with the lesions examined expressed generally undetectable or lightly detectable (0 or 1+) amounts of OSN and OPN (92 and 81%, respectively). Benign breast lesions, including fibroadenoma and fibrocystic dysplasia, were generally weakly stained (0 or 1+) with both anti-OSN and anti-OPN antibodies (96.4 and 60.7%, respectively). Interestingly, the majority of both in situ and invasive breast carcinoma lesions showed a strong expression (2+ or 3+) for OSN or OPN (74.5 and 84.3%, respectively). High expression of these two bone matrix proteins was associated with frequent microcalcification deposition in the lesion. This study is the first extensive study of OSN and OPN expression in mammary cancers. Our data suggest that OSN and OPN could play a role in the formation of ectopic microcalcifications often associated with breast cancer. It is also tempting to speculate that the expression of these two glycoproteins by breast cancer cells play a role in the preferred bone homing of breast metastases. [less ▲]

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See detailIncreased expression of receptor activator of NF-kappa B ligand (RANKL), its receptor RANK and its decoy receptor osteoprotegerin in the colon of Crohn's disease patients
Franchimont, N.; Reenaers, Catherine ULg; Lambert, Chantal ULg et al

in Clinical & Experimental Immunology (2004), 138(3), 491-498

Crohn's disease (CD) is associated with low bone mass due to chronic inflammation and other factors. Receptor activator of NF-kappaB ligand (RANKL), its receptor RANK and its decoy receptor ... [more ▼]

Crohn's disease (CD) is associated with low bone mass due to chronic inflammation and other factors. Receptor activator of NF-kappaB ligand (RANKL), its receptor RANK and its decoy receptor osteoprotegerin (OPG) are potentially involved in this process as they regulate osteoclastogenesis and are influenced by pro-inflammatory cytokines. The aim of this study was to determine the levels of soluble RANKL (sRANKL), RANK and OPG expression both in the serum and in the colon of CD patients. Levels of sRANKL and OPG were assessed in the serum and the supernatants of cultured colonic biopsies in patients with CD and controls by ELISA. RANK expression was explored by immunostaining and immunofluorescence of fixed colonic samples. OPG and sRANKL levels were higher in the serum of CD patients as compared to age- and sex-matched controls. Levels of sRANKL and OPG were significantly enhanced in cultured colonic biopsies from CD, and OPG levels correlated with histological inflammation, and pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine levels. No significant correlation was found for sRANKL. RANK(+) cells were increased in the colon of CD, particularly in inflamed areas. These cells were positive for CD68 or S100 protein. We conclude that serum and local levels of sRANKL and OPG are increased in CD. Moreover, RANK is expressed in the colonic mucosa by subpopulations of activated macrophages or dendritic cells at higher levels in CD compared to normal colon. [less ▲]

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See detailIncreased expression of the laminin receptor in human colon cancer.
Cioce, V.; Castronovo, Vincenzo ULg; Shmookler, B. M. et al

in Journal of the National Cancer Institute (1991), 83(1), 29-36

It has been proposed that among the various cell-surface proteins capable of interacting with laminin, the 67-kd high-affinity laminin receptor plays a crucial role during tumor invasion and metastasis ... [more ▼]

It has been proposed that among the various cell-surface proteins capable of interacting with laminin, the 67-kd high-affinity laminin receptor plays a crucial role during tumor invasion and metastasis. In this study, the expression of laminin-receptor-precursor messenger RNA (mRNA) and 67-kd protein was analyzed in human colon adenocarcinoma. In 22 of 23 patients with colon cancer, we found a 2- to 23-fold increase in levels of laminin-receptor-precursor mRNA in the cancer tissues compared with those in matched normal adjacent colonic mucosa. In 10 of 11 cases studied, the level of 67-kd laminin receptor, detected by affinity-purified anti-laminin-receptor synthetic peptide antibodies on immunoblots of matched tumor and normal tissue extracts, was higher in the colon carcinoma tissue. Immunodetection of laminin receptor in tissue sections using anti-laminin-receptor-peptide antibodies confirmed that the increased expression of laminin receptor was specifically associated with the cancer cells. In a series of 72 paraffin sections of colon lesions, we observed a correlation between the expression of the laminin receptor and the Dukes' classification. Our observations indicate that increased expression of laminin-receptor-precursor mRNA is associated with enhanced levels of the 67-kd laminin receptor as well as with the invasive phenotype of colon carcinoma. Detection of this metastasis-associated gene product may be a valuable adjunct in the evaluation of human colon cancer. [less ▲]

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See detailIncreased expression of the putative axon growth-repulsive extracellular matrix molecule, keratan sulphate proteoglycan, following traumatic injury of the adult rat spinal cord
Krautstrunk, M.; Scholtes, Félix ULg; Martin, Didier ULg et al

in Acta Neuropathologica (2002), 104(6), 592-600

Keratan sulphate proteoglycan (KSPG) is a developmentally regulated barrier molecule, directing axonal growth during central nervous system (CNS) formation. The possible re-expression and functional ... [more ▼]

Keratan sulphate proteoglycan (KSPG) is a developmentally regulated barrier molecule, directing axonal growth during central nervous system (CNS) formation. The possible re-expression and functional significance of KSPG in preventing axon regeneration following spinal cord injury (SCI) is poorly understood. In the present investigation, the spatio-temporal expression of KSPG was studied following experimental SCI. There was no indication of sparing of axons at the lesion epicentre following severe compression injury. By 7 days post operation (p.o.) a diffuse increase of KSPG immunoreactivity (KSPG-IR) was observed in the parenchyma surrounding the lesion. This was followed by a delayed (21-28 days p.o.) and largely heterogeneous increase of KSPG-IR in the lesion epicentre, which revealed both cellular and extracellular matrix-like distribution patterns. Although no re-growth of anterogradely labelled corticospinal axons was observed, many 200-kDa neurofilament (NF)-positive axon could be detected growing into the connective tissue scar. This phase of spontaneous axonal re-growth was closely associated with a framework of glial cells (including Schwann cells from damaged local spinal nerve roots) that had migrated into the lesion site. The spontaneous nerve fibre re-growth could be detected in both KSPG-rich and KSPG-poor territories. The present data suggest that the lesion-induced up-regulation of KSPG-IR may have contributed to the lack of corticospinal axon re-growth. However, the lack of any direct spatio-temporal correlation between the distribution of raised KSPG-IR and spontaneous NF-positive axonal regeneration suggests that at least some populations of axons can resist the putative inhibitory effects of this extracellular matrix molecule. [less ▲]

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See detailIncreased fecundity of malathion-specific resistant beetles in absence of insecticide pressure
Arnaud, Ludovic; Brostaux, Yves ULg; Assie, Lazare Komenan et al

in Heredity (2002), 89(6), 425-429

Despite that resistance frequency is assumed to decline when selective pressure is relaxed, the stability of resistance frequency has been observed in some insects in the absence of insecticide. In the ... [more ▼]

Despite that resistance frequency is assumed to decline when selective pressure is relaxed, the stability of resistance frequency has been observed in some insects in the absence of insecticide. In the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, the first case of malathion-resistance was reported in the early 1960s. The malathion-specific resistant phenotype has now almost completely replaced the susceptible one in red flour beetle populations. In the present study, several life-history traits that could influence the fitness of the insects were compared between insecticide-susceptible and malathion-specific resistant populations of the red flour beetle. On average, egg fertility and egg-to-adult development time did not differ between susceptible and resistant populations. However, the fecundity of resistant females was greater than that of susceptible ones. Generally, differences in development time between insecticide resistant and susceptible populations are considered as having more effect on fitness than do differences in fecundity. However, the observed increased female fecundity may participate, in combination with the previously observed increased male reproductive success, to the development and the stability of malathion-specific resistance in T. castaneum. [less ▲]

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See detailIncreased frequency of bronchial hyperresponsiveness in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.
Louis, Edouard ULg; Louis, Renaud ULg; Drion, V. et al

in Allergy (1995), 50(9), 729-33

Although bronchopulmonary manifestations are rare in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), subclinical abnormalities have been described in up to 50% of cases. The pathophysiology of these abnormalities ... [more ▼]

Although bronchopulmonary manifestations are rare in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), subclinical abnormalities have been described in up to 50% of cases. The pathophysiology of these abnormalities remains unknown. However, a latent inflammation of the bronchial mucosa secondary to the inflammation of the intestinal mucosa has been suggested. This subclinical inflammation may lead to increased bronchial responsiveness. We studied the bronchial responsiveness in 38 inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients, using the methacholine test. Bronchial hyperresponsiveness was defined by a PC20M < 16 mg/ml. Twenty-four healthy controls were also studied. There was no significant difference in baseline FEV1 between IBD patients and controls. However, there was a significantly greater fall in FEV1 in the IBD patients at the concentrations of methacholine tested. The frequency of bronchial hyperresponsiveness was significantly higher in the IBD population (45%) than in controls (17%; P < 0.03). Atopy, defined by skin test, was more common in IBD patients (42%) than in controls (21%). Even when only nonatopic subjects were considered, the frequency of bronchial hyperresponsiveness was significantly higher in IBD patients (41%) than in controls (5%; P < 0.02). Thus, subclinical bronchial hyperresponsiveness is common in IBD, and may be considered a further extraintestinal manifestation. [less ▲]

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