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See detailLe kimbanguisme et le pouvoir en RDC : entre apolitisme et conception théologico-politique
Melice, Anne ULg

in Civilisations (2009), LVIII(2), 59-80

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See detailKindliches Kriegserleben als autobiografischer Gegenstand. Der Erste Weltkrieg in den Autobiografien von Sebastian Haffner, Jean-Paul Sartre und Hilde Spiel
Viehöver, Vera ULg

in Schmitz, Helmut; Preußer, Heinz-Peter (Eds.) Autobiografie und historische Krisenerfahrung (2010)

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See detailLa kiné de qualité en cinq ans à l'unif
Henrotin, Yves ULg

Article for general public (2004)

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See detailKinematic analysis of swimming ontogeny in seabass (Dicentrarchus labrax).
Olivier, Damien ULg; Vandewalle, Nicolas ULg; Parmentier, Eric ULg et al

in Belgian Journal of Zoology (2013)

Swimming has been investigated in multiple species, but few studies consider the establishment of swimming through ontogeny. This study describes the establishment of cyclical swimming in Dicentrachus ... [more ▼]

Swimming has been investigated in multiple species, but few studies consider the establishment of swimming through ontogeny. This study describes the establishment of cyclical swimming in Dicentrachus labrax, a marine fish from cold, temperate waters. The data were compared with results from previous studies on two subtropical freshwater catfish species (Clarias gariepinus and Corydoras aeneus). The three species have different modes of locomotion during their adult stage (anguilliform, subacarangiform and carangiform). The swimming of Dicentrarchus labrax was recorded with a high-speed video camera (500 fps) from 0 to 288 hours and from 960 to 2496 hours post-hatching. Three indices, i.e. coefficient of determination (r²), coefficient of variation (CV), and Strouhal number (St), were used to investigate the establishment and efficiency of swimming. Important differences in the timing of swimming establishment were observed between the seabass and the two catfish species. The two catfish species display a sine-shape swimming mode immediately or soon after hatching, and the efficiency of movement substantially improves during the first days of life. For seabass, however, establishment of swimming is slower during the same developmental period. These differences may be related to a faster developmental rate in the catfishes that allows them to swim rapidly in an intermediate regime flow and to develop the required morphology to establish efficient movements earlier. [less ▲]

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See detailA kinematic model for hysteretic dissipation of vibration energy for torsional damper and detuner.
Danilin, Alexander; Vinogradov, Alexander; Lilien, Jean-Louis ULg

in Lilien, Jean-Louis (Ed.) Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Cable Dynamics (2007, December)

A description of the damping properties and model of a low frequency damper for power lines galloping.

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See detailKinematical Optimization of Closed-Loop Multibody Systems
Collard, Jean-François; Duysinx, Pierre ULg; Fisette, Paul

in Botasso, Carlo (Ed.) Multibody Dynamics - Computational Methods and Applications (2009)

Applying optimization techniques in the field of multibody systems (MBS) has become more and more attractive considering the increasing development of computer resources. One of the main issues in the ... [more ▼]

Applying optimization techniques in the field of multibody systems (MBS) has become more and more attractive considering the increasing development of computer resources. One of the main issues in the optimization of MBS concerns closed-loop systems which involve non-linear assembly constraints that must be solved before any analysis of the system. The addressed question is: how to optimize such closed-loop topologies when the objective evaluation relies on the assembly of the system? The authors have previously proposed to artificially penalize the objective function when those assembly constraints cannot be exactly fulfilled. However, the method suffers from some limitations especially due to the difficulty to get a differentiable objective function. Therefore, the key idea of this paper is to improve the penalty approach. Practically, instead of solving the assembly constraints, their norm is minimized and the residue is taken as a penalty term instead of an artificial value. Hence, the penalized objective function becomes differentiable throughout the design space, which enables the use of efficient gradient-based optimization methods such as the sequential quadratic programming (SQP) method. To illustrate the reliability and generality of the method, two applications are presented. They are related to the isotropy of parallel manipulators. The first optimization problem concerns a 3-dof Delta robot with 5 design parameters and the second one deals with a more complex 6-dof model of the Hunt platform involving 10 design variables. [less ▲]

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See detailKinematics-Based Macro Models for Deep Beams
Mihaylov, Boyan ULg

Scientific conference (2012, June 14)

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See detailKinetic and binding properties of the oxoglutarate translocator of rat-heart mitochondria.
Sluse, Francis ULg; Duyckaerts, Claire ULg; Sluse-Goffart, Claudine et al

in European Journal of Biochemistry (1979), 100

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See detailKinetic and crystallographic studies of extended-spectrum GES-11, GES-12, and GES-14 β-lactamases.
Delbrück, Heinrich; Bogaerts, Pierre; Kupper, Michaël et al

in Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (2012), 56(11)

GES-1 is a class A extended-spectrum β-lactamase conferring resistance to penicillins, narrow- and expanded-spectrum cephalosporins, and ceftazidime. However, GES-1 poorly hydrolyzes aztreonam and ... [more ▼]

GES-1 is a class A extended-spectrum β-lactamase conferring resistance to penicillins, narrow- and expanded-spectrum cephalosporins, and ceftazidime. However, GES-1 poorly hydrolyzes aztreonam and cephamycins and exhibits very low k(cat) values for carbapenems. Twenty-two GES variants have been discovered thus far, differing from each other by 1 to 3 amino acid substitutions that affect substrate specificity. GES-11 possesses a Gly243Ala substitution which seems to confer to this variant an increased activity against aztreonam and ceftazidime. GES-12 differs from GES-11 by a single Thr237Ala substitution, while GES-14 differs from GES-11 by the Gly170Ser mutation, which is known to confer increased carbapenemase activity. GES-11 and GES-12 were kinetically characterized and compared to GES-1 and GES-14. Purified GES-11 and GES-12 showed strong activities against most tested β-lactams, with the exception of temocillin, cefoxitin, and carbapenems. Both variants showed a significantly increased rate of hydrolysis of cefotaxime, ceftazidime, and aztreonam. On the other hand, GES-11 and GES-12 (and GES-14) variants all containing Ala243 exhibited increased susceptibility to classical inhibitors. The crystallographic structures of the GES-11 and GES-14 β-lactamases were solved. The overall structures of GES-11 and GES-14 are similar to that of GES-1. The Gly243Ala substitution caused only subtle local rearrangements, notably in the typical carbapenemase disulfide bond. The active sites of GES-14 and GES-11 are very similar, with the Gly170Ser substitution leading only to the formation of additional hydrogen bonds of the Ser residue with hydrolytic water and the Glu166 residue. [less ▲]

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See detailKinetic and structural optimization to catalysis at low temperatures in a psychrophilic cellulase from the Antarctic bacterium Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis
Garsoux, G.; Lamotte, J.; Gerday, Charles ULg et al

in Biochemical Journal (2004), 384(Pt 2), 247-253

The cold-adapted cellulase CelG has been purified from the culture supernatant of the Antarctic bacterium Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis and the gene coding for this enzyme has been cloned, sequenced and ... [more ▼]

The cold-adapted cellulase CelG has been purified from the culture supernatant of the Antarctic bacterium Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis and the gene coding for this enzyme has been cloned, sequenced and expressed in Escherichia coli. This cellulase is composed of three structurally and functionally distinct regions: an N-terminal catalytic domain belonging to glycosidase family 5 and a C-terminal cellulose-binding domain belonging to carbohydrate-binding module family 5. The linker of 107 residues connecting both domains is one of the longest found in cellulases, and optimizes substrate accessibility to the catalytic domain by drastically increasing the Surface of cellulose available to a bound enzyme molecule. The psychrophilic enzyme is closely related to the cellulase Cel5 from Erwinia chrysanthemi. Both k(cat) and k(cat)/K-m values at 4 degreesC for the psychrophilic cellulase are similar to the values for Cel5 at 30-35 degreesC, suggesting temperature adaptation of the kinetic parameters. The thermodynamic parameters of activation of CelG suggest a heat-labile, relatively disordered active site with low substrate affinity, in agreement with the experimental data. The structure of CelG has been constructed by homology modelling with a molecule of cellotetraose docked into the active site. No structural alteration related to cold-activity can be found in the catalytic cleft, whereas several structural factors in the overall structure can explain the weak thermal stability, suggesting that the loss of stability provides the required active-site mobility at low temperatures. [less ▲]

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See detailKinetic characterization of the monofunctional glycosyltransferase from Staphylococcus aureus
Terrak, Mohammed ULg; Nguyen-Disteche, M.

in Journal of Bacteriology (2006), 188(7), 2528-2532

The glycosyltransferase (GT) module of class A penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) and monofunctional GTs (MGTs) belong to the GT51 family in the sequence-based classification of GTs. They both possess ... [more ▼]

The glycosyltransferase (GT) module of class A penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) and monofunctional GTs (MGTs) belong to the GT51 family in the sequence-based classification of GTs. They both possess five conserved motifs and use lipid II precursor (undecaprenyl-pyrophosphate-N-acetylglucosaminyl-N-acetylmuramoyl- pentapeptide) to synthesize the glycan chain of the bacterial wall peptidoglycan. MGTs appear to be dispensable for growth of some bacteria in vitro. However, new evidence shows that they may be essential for the infection process and development of pathogenic bacteria in their hosts. Only a small number of class A PBPs have been characterized so far, and no kinetic data are available on MGTs. In this study, we present the principal enzymatic properties of the Staphylococcus aureus MGT. The enzyme catalyzes glycan chain polymerization with an efficiency of similar to 5,800 M-1 s(-1) and has a pH optimum of 7.5, and its activity requires metal ions with a maximum observed in the presence of Mn2+. The properties of S. aureus MGT are distinct from those of S. aureus PBP2 and Escherichia coli MGT, but they are similar to those of E. coli PBP1b. We examined the role of the conserved Glu100 of S. aureus MGT (equivalent to the proposed catalytic Glu233 of E. coli PBP1b) by site-directed mutagenesis. The Glu100Gln mutation results in a drastic loss of GT activity. This shows that Glu100 is also critical for catalysis in S. aureus MGT and confirms that the conserved glutamate of the first motif EDXXFXX(H/N)X(G/A) is likely the key catalytic residue in the GT51 active site. [less ▲]

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See detailKinetic Energy Release Distributions for Tropylium and Benzylium Ion Formation from the Toluene Cation.
Fati, D.; Lorquet, Andrée ULg; Locht, Robert ULg et al

in Journal of Physical Chemistry A (2004), 108

Hydrogen loss from the toluene molecular ion generates benzylium (Bz(+)) and tropylium (Tr+) ions via two competitive and independent pathways. The corresponding kinetic energy release distributions ... [more ▼]

Hydrogen loss from the toluene molecular ion generates benzylium (Bz(+)) and tropylium (Tr+) ions via two competitive and independent pathways. The corresponding kinetic energy release distributions (KERDs) have been determined under various conditions in the metastable time window for toluene and perdeuterated toluene and have been analyzed by the maximum entropy method (MEM). The isomeric fraction Tr+/Bz(+) is found to be equal to 0.9 +/- 0.3, in good agreement with the values obtained using photodissociation and charge exchange experiments. It is, however, in disagreement with the value 5 +/- 2 deduced by Moon, Choe, and Kim (J. Phys. Cheln. A 2000, 104, 458) from KERD measurements. The origin of the discrepancy is suggested to be the inadequacy of the orbiting transition state theory (OTST) for the calculation of KERDs in hydrogen loss reactions. For both channels, more translational energy is released in the reaction coordinate than would be expected on statistical grounds because of the presence of a barrier along the reaction path. For the Bz(+) channel, the barrier entirely results from centrifugal effects. Rotational energy is converted into translation as a result of angular momentum conservation. Deuteration is observed to reduce the importance of the rotational energy flow in the reaction coordinate. The Tr+ channel is characterized by the presence of a reverse activation energy barrier of electronic origin. The energy in excess of the dissociation asymptote can be partitioned into two components: the reverse barrier plus a nonfixed energy contribution. About 40% of the reverse barrier is converted into relative translational motion of the fragments. Here again, a lower fraction of the nonfixed energy flows into translation for the deuterated isotopomer. [less ▲]

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See detailKinetic Energy Release Distributions in the Dissociation of Energy-Selected Fluoroethene and 1,1-Difluoroethene Ions.
Güthe, F.; Locht, Robert ULg; Leyh, Bernard ULg et al

in Journal of Physical Chemistry A (1999), 103

The unimolecular dissociation of energy-selected fluoroethene and 1,1-difluoroethene ions has been investigated by threshold photoelectron photoion coincidence TPEPICO) technique. The breakdown diagrams ... [more ▼]

The unimolecular dissociation of energy-selected fluoroethene and 1,1-difluoroethene ions has been investigated by threshold photoelectron photoion coincidence TPEPICO) technique. The breakdown diagrams of the 1,1-difluorethene and fluoroethene have been recorded between 13-22 eV. From time-of-flight (TOF) spectra, complete distributions of the kinetic energy released (KERD) in the dissociation of these energy-selected ions have been derived. For the HF-loss reaction channel, the KERD peaks at about 200 meV for low excitation energies but becomes thermal at higher excitation energies. For the F-loss channel, the KERD peaks at zero kinetic energy for low excitation energies but at about 200 meV for high excitation energy. The analysis of the KERD provides evidence that consecutive fragmentation takes place for the 1,1-difluoroethene at energies above 19 eV. [less ▲]

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See detailThe kinetic growth anisotropy of the 123-(RE)BaCuO compounds
Vandewalle, Nicolas ULg; Ausloos, Marcel ULg

in Philosophical Magazine A (1995), 72(3), 727-736

The kinetic growth anisotropy of the melt-textured 123-(RE)BaCuO compounds, especially along the CuCO2 planes, is discussed here in detail. A computer model which simulates the grain growth of 123 ... [more ▼]

The kinetic growth anisotropy of the melt-textured 123-(RE)BaCuO compounds, especially along the CuCO2 planes, is discussed here in detail. A computer model which simulates the grain growth of 123 materials in the ab plane is presented. This kinetic growth model takes some bond anisotropy along the [100] and [110] directions into account. The model presented herein belongs to a hierarchical set of generalized Eden models as discussed in the Appendix. For different bond anisotropy parameters, the simulated 123-(RE)BaCUO grains exhibit square and octogonal overall shape which have been both optically observed. From simple kinetic arguments, we show that the 'faceting' of the 123-(RE)BaCuO grains finds its origin in a bond anisotropy rather than in a growth-rate anisotropy along some crystallographic directions. This is of general interest and opens new perspectives for developing the Eden model in the crystal-growth field. [less ▲]

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See detailKinetic mechanism of mitochondria carriers catalysing exchange reactions
Sluse, Francis ULg; Evens, A.; Duyckaerts, Claire ULg et al

in Journal of Biosciences (1990), 15

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See detailKinetic mechanism of the adenylic and the oxoglutaruc carriers : a comparison
Sluse, Francis ULg; Sluse-goffart, C.; Duyckaerts, Claire ULg

in Azzi, A.; Nalecz, M. J.; Wojtczak, L. (Eds.) Anion carriers of mitochondrial membranes (1989)

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See detailKinetic mechanism of the exchanges catalysed by the adenine-nucleotide carrier.
Duyckaerts, Claire ULg; Sluse-Goffart, Claudine; Fux, Jean-pierre et al

in European Journal of Biochemistry (1980), 106

Detailed reference viewed: 14 (1 ULg)