Browsing
     by title


0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

or enter first few letters:   
OK
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailIn vitro antagonistic activity evaluation of Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) combined with cellulase enzyme against Campylobacter jejuni growth in co-culture
Dubois Dauphin, Robin ULg; vandeplas, Sabrina; Didderen, Isabelle et al

in Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology (2011), 21(1), 62-70

The antibacterial effects of nine Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) on Campylobacter jejuni were investigated using agar gel diffusion and co-culture assay. Inhibition potential was not the same between both ... [more ▼]

The antibacterial effects of nine Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) on Campylobacter jejuni were investigated using agar gel diffusion and co-culture assay. Inhibition potential was not the same between both techniques. Only two LAB, Lb. pentosus CWBI B78 and E. faecium THT, showed an anti-campylobacter activity in co-culture assay in using dehydrated poultry excreta mixed with ground straw (DPE/GS) as the only growth substrate source. It was observed that the complementation with Cellulase A complex (Beldem S.A.) of this medium enhanced antimicrobial effect of both bacteria. The co-culture medium acidification was correlated with the concentration in supplemented enzyme. The antibacterial effect was characterized by the production of lactic acid by the homofermentative E. faecium THT and the lactic and acetic acids production by the heterofermentative Lb. pentosus CWBI B78. The antagonistic properties from bacteria-enzyme cooperation could reduce the prevalence of Campylobacter consequently the risk of human infection. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 175 (16 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailIn Vitro Anticancer Potential of Tree Extracts from the Walloon Region Forest.
Frederich, Michel ULg; Marcowycz, Aline; Cieckiewicz, Ewa ULg et al

in Planta Medica (2009), 75(15), 1634-1637

Forty-eight extracts from 16 common Belgian trees from the Walloon Region forest were evaluated for IN VITRO growth inhibitory activity against the human LoVo colon cancer, PC3 prostate cancer, and U373 ... [more ▼]

Forty-eight extracts from 16 common Belgian trees from the Walloon Region forest were evaluated for IN VITRO growth inhibitory activity against the human LoVo colon cancer, PC3 prostate cancer, and U373 glioblastoma cell lines. Our study was performed with the aim of selecting plant candidates in order to later isolate new anticancer compounds from an easily affordable tree material. Extracts from ALNUS GLUTINOSA (stem bark), CARPINUS BETULUS (leaves and stem bark), CASTANEA SATIVA (stem bark), FAGUS SYLVATICA (leaves), ILEX AQUIFOLIUM (leaves), LARIX DECIDUA (leaves), QUERCUS PETRAEA (stem bark), and QUERCUS ROBUR (leaves) showed for the first time potent IN VITRO growth inhibitory activity and could become easily affordable sources of potential new anticancer agents. Root extracts from ROBINIA PSEUDOACACIA, already known for containing cytotoxic lectins, also showed interesting activity. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 85 (18 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailIn vitro antimicrobial activity of plants used in Cambodian traditional medicine
Chea, Aun; Jonville, Marie ULg; Bun, Sok-Siya et al

in American Journal of Chinese Medicine (The) (2007), 35(5), 867-873

The purpose of the present study was to screen 27 plant species used in the traditional medicine of Cambodia for in vitro antibacterial and antifungal activities. Thirty-three methanolic extracts were ... [more ▼]

The purpose of the present study was to screen 27 plant species used in the traditional medicine of Cambodia for in vitro antibacterial and antifungal activities. Thirty-three methanolic extracts were tested against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Mycobacterium smegmatis and Candida albicans. Screened by disk diffusion assay, the extracts showed antimicrobial activity especially on Gram-positive bacteria. None of the crude methanolic extracts showed activity against P. aeruginosa. Twenty-five selected extracts were evaluated using a micro-dilution test. Harrisonia perforata (roots) and Hymenodictyon excelsum (bark) exhibited a bactericidal effect against S. aureus at a concentration of 500 μg/ml. Azadirachta indica (bark), Harrisonia perforata (roots and stem) and Shorea obtusa (roots) exhibited a bactericidal effect against M. smegmatis at 250 μg/ml. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 157 (5 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailIn vitro antiplasmodial activity of ethnobotanically selected plants from Burkina Faso
Jansen, Olivia ULg; Angenot, Luc ULg; Tits, Monique ULg et al

in Planta Medica (2008), 74(9), 1142-1142

Detailed reference viewed: 54 (22 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailIn vitro antiplasmodial activity of five plants used in Benin in traditional medicine to treat malaria
Bero, J.; Frederich, Michel ULg; De Mol, Patrick ULg et al

in Planta Medica (2008), 74(9), 1002-1002

Detailed reference viewed: 23 (8 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailIn vitro antiplasmodial activity of plants used in Benin in traditional medicine to treat malaria
Bero, Joanne; Ganfon, Habib; Jonville, Marie ULg et al

in Journal of Ethnopharmacology (2009), 122

Aim of the study: The aim of the studywas to evaluate the in vitro antiplasmodial activity of crude extracts of 12 plant species traditionally used in Benin for the treatment of malaria in order to ... [more ▼]

Aim of the study: The aim of the studywas to evaluate the in vitro antiplasmodial activity of crude extracts of 12 plant species traditionally used in Benin for the treatment of malaria in order to validate their use. Materials and methods: For each species, dichloromethane, methanol and total aqueous extracts were tested. The antiplasmodial activity of extracts was evaluated using the measurement of the plasmodial lactate dehydrogenase activity on chloroquine-sensitive (3D7) and resistant (W2) strains of Plasmodium falciparum. The selectivity of the different extractswas evaluated using the MTT test on J774 macrophagelike murine cells and WI38 human normal fibroblasts. Results: The best growth inhibition of both strains of Plasmodium falciparum was observed with the dichloromethane extracts of Acanthospermum hispidum DC. (Asteraceae) (IC50 =7.5 g/ml on 3D7 and 4.8 g/ml on W2), Keetia leucantha (K. Krause) Bridson (syn. Plectronia leucantha Krause) (Rubiaceae) leaves and twigs (IC50 = 13.8 and 11.3 g/ml on 3D7 and IC50 = 26.5 and 15.8 g/ml on W2, respectively), Carpolobia lutea G.Don. (Polygalaceae) (IC50 = 19.4 g/ml on 3D7 and 8.1 g/ml on W2) and Strychnos spinosa Lam. (Loganiaceae) leaves (IC50 = 15.6 g/ml on 3D7 and 8.9 g/ml on W2). All these extracts had a low cytotoxicity. Conclusion: Our study gives some justifications for the traditional uses of some investigated plants. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 113 (10 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailIn vitro antiplasmodial activity of Tithonia diversifolia and identification of its main active constituent: tagitinin C.
Goffin, Eric ULg; Ziemons, Eric ULg; De Mol, Patrick ULg et al

in Planta Medica (2002), 68(6), 543-5

The antimalarial properties of Tithonia diversifolia, an Asteraceae traditionally used to treat malaria, were investigated in vitro against three strains of Plasmodium falciparum. The ether extract from ... [more ▼]

The antimalarial properties of Tithonia diversifolia, an Asteraceae traditionally used to treat malaria, were investigated in vitro against three strains of Plasmodium falciparum. The ether extract from aerial parts of the plant collected in Sao Tome e Principe, demonstrated good antiplasmodial activity (IC 50 on FCA strain: 0.75 microg/ml). A bioassay guided fractionation of this extract led to the isolation of the known sesquiterpene lactone tagitinin C as an active component against Plasmodium (IC 50 on FCA strain: 0.33 microg/ml), but also possessing cytotoxic properties (IC 50 on HTC-116 cells: 0.706 microg/ml). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 137 (11 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailIn vitro antitrypanosomal and antiplasmodial activities of crude extracts and essential oils of Ocimum gratissimum Linn from Benin and influence of vegetative stage.
Kpadonou Kpoviessi, Benedicta G. H.; Kpoviessi, Salome D. S.; Yayi Ladekan, Eleonore et al

in Journal of ethnopharmacology (2014), 155(3), 1417-23

ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: Different parts of Ocimum gratissimum Linn are largely used in folk medicine for the treatment of many diseases, some of which related to parasitical infections as fevers ... [more ▼]

ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: Different parts of Ocimum gratissimum Linn are largely used in folk medicine for the treatment of many diseases, some of which related to parasitical infections as fevers and headaches. In order to validate their use and to clarify the plant part which possesses the best antiparasitic properties, we decided to evaluate the in vitro antiplasmodial and antitrypanosomal activities of essential oils and crude extracts from leaves, stems and seeds of Ocimum gratissimum as well as their cytotoxicity. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The essential oils and ethanol crude extracts of leaves and stems of Ocimum gratissimum from Benin, were obtained in pre and full flowering stages. Seeds obtained only in full flowering stage, were also extracted. The oils were isolated by hydrodistillation and analyzed by GC/MS and GC/FID. Extracts and essential oils were tested in vitro against Trypanosoma brucei brucei and Plasmodium falciparum. Cytotoxicity was evaluated in vitro against Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells and the human non cancer fibroblast cell line (WI38) through MTT assay to evaluate the selectivity and toxicity was assessed against Artemia salina Leach. RESULTS: The essential oils and non-volatile crude extracts of Ocimum gratissimum were more active on Trypanosoma brucei brucei than on Plasmodium falciparum (3D7). This activity varies according to the vegetative stage (pre and full flowering) and the plant part (seeds, stems and leaves) extracted. The best growth inhibition of Trypanosoma brucei brucei was observed with ethanol crude extracts of leaves (IC50=1.66 +/- 0.48 mug/mL) and seeds (IC50=1.29 +/- 0.42 mug/mL) in full flowering stage with good selectivity (SI>10). The chemical composition of the essential oil from aerial parts (47 compounds), characterized by the presence as main constituents of p-cymene, thymol, gamma-terpinene, beta-myrcene and alpha-thujene, depends on the vegetative stage. The oil contained some minor compounds such as myrcene (IC50=2.24 +/- 0.27mug/mL), citronellal (IC50=2.76 +/- 1.55mug/mL), limonene (IC50=4.24 +/- 2.27mug/mL), with good antitrypanosomal activities. These oils and crude extracts were not toxic against Artemia salina Leach and had a low cytotoxicity except leaves and seeds ethanol extracts obtained in full flowering which showed toxicity against CHO and WI38 cells. CONCLUSIONS: Our study shows that ethanol crude extracts of leaves and seeds of Ocimum gratissimum in full flowering stage can be a good source of antitrypanosomal agents. This is the first report about the relation between the plant part extracted, the vegetative stage of the plant, the antitrypanosomal and antiplasmodial activities and the cytotoxicity of essential oils and non-volatile extracts of Ocimum gratissimum from Benin. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 11 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailIn vitro approach to study the synergistic effects of tobramycin and clarithromycin against Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms using prokaryotic or eukaryotic culture media
Thellin, Olivier ULg; Zorzi, Willy ULg; Jolois, Olivier et al

in International Journal of Antimicrobial Agents Corresponding (in press)

Detailed reference viewed: 22 (9 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailIn vitro assessment of novel carbohydrates prebiotic potential in a co-inoculation model of the pig intestines
Tran, Thi Hanh Tham ULg; Boudry, Christelle; Everaert, Nadia ULg et al

in Book of Abstracts (2015)

Introduction: Innovative plant biomass fractionation methods produce new feed additives that could modulate the pig intestinal microbial population. Material and methods: Such novel indigestible ... [more ▼]

Introduction: Innovative plant biomass fractionation methods produce new feed additives that could modulate the pig intestinal microbial population. Material and methods: Such novel indigestible carbohydrates (CHO) were investigated for their prebiotic potential and their influence on Salmonella thyphimurium in a co-inocu¬lation in vitro fermentation model of the pig intestines. Inulin, cellobiose, pecto- (POS), iso-malto- (IMOS), xylo-oligosaccharides (XOS), and gluconic acid (GLU) were fermented by fecal microbes for 72h. Salmonella (7.3 log CFU/ml) were co-inoculated after 6h . Fer¬mentation kinetics was modeled and after 6, 12, 24 h, broth was analysed for short-chain fatty acid using HPLC and bacterial population using q-PCR. Results and discussion: Cellobiose was the fastest fermenting CHO followed by inulin and IMOS (P<0.01). After 6h, cellobiose yielded the highest SCFA production (684 mg/g) and lactate molar ratio (0.484). POS fermented slower. XOS and GLU were little fermented (150 and 175 mg SCFA/g after 24h). Nonetheless, GLU yielded the highest butyrate molar ratio (0.290 at 12h) (P<0.01). Although Salmonella counts did not differ, some CHO dis¬played obvious prebiotic properties, namely inulin and IMOS since they supported the highest growth of Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria populations after 6 and 12h of fermen¬tation (8.18 to 8.56 log CFU/ml) (P<0.01). Cellobiose and GLU scored well for Lactobacilli too, but poorly for Bifidobacteria (6.41 to 6.92 log CFU/ml) (P<0.01). It is concluded that IMOS seem the most promising prebiotic but owing to their fermentation patterns yield¬ing high levels of lactate or butyrate, also cellobiose and GLU deserve further investigation in in vivo models. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 58 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailIn vitro Biocompatibility and Genotoxicity Assessment of a Gentamicin-Loaded Monoolein Gel Intended to Treat of Chronic Osteomyelitis
Ouédraogo, M; Nacoulma, E.C; Semdé, R et al

in Journal of Pharmacology & Toxicology (2008), 3(5),

The aim of the study was to assess in vitro the biocompatibility and the genotoxicity of a gentamicin-loaded monoolein gel intended to treat of chronic osteomyelitis. Indeed, we are developing ... [more ▼]

The aim of the study was to assess in vitro the biocompatibility and the genotoxicity of a gentamicin-loaded monoolein gel intended to treat of chronic osteomyelitis. Indeed, we are developing biodegradable implants based on monoolein and gentamicin. The results of formulations, physico-chemical characterization of the formulated implants and in vitro release kinetic of gentamicin from implants were encouraging. As biocompatibility and absence of genotoxicity are the prerequisites for safe use of implants, we performed in vitro hemolysis, cytotoxicity and, genotoxicity tests. Hemolysis was evaluated by incubating human erythrocytes in direct contact with the implant whereas cytotoxicity was evaluated by 3-[4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay using fibroblasts and macrophages. Alkaline comet Assay was used to evaluate genotoxic potential of the implants. From these in vitro assays, the implant based on monoolein and gentamicin showed no genotoxic potential and has satisfactory biocompatibility. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 36 (1 ULg)
Full Text
See detailIn vitro characterisation of dietary fibre fermentation in the pig intestines and its influence on nitrogen excretion
Bindelle, Jérôme ULg

Doctoral thesis (2008)

Increasing attention has been paid to dietary fibre (DF) fermentation in the large intestine of pigs during the past years in pig nutrition. The bacterial growth supported by DF intestinal fermentation ... [more ▼]

Increasing attention has been paid to dietary fibre (DF) fermentation in the large intestine of pigs during the past years in pig nutrition. The bacterial growth supported by DF intestinal fermentation induces a shift of N excretion from urea in urine to bacterial protein in faeces that reduces NH3 emission from the manure. The objective of this thesis was to investigate the relationship between DF fermentability, intestinal bacteria growth and the N excretion. In the first part, an in vitro gas-test method using a living bacterial inoculum developed for ruminants was adapted to the pig. The use of pig colonic content was compared to faeces for the preparation of the inoculum and it was concluded that faeces could replace intestinal content, avoiding the use of cannulated animals. Secondly, the influence of a pespin-pancreatin hydrolysis prior to the fermentation in order to simulate digestion in the stomach and the small intestine was demonstrated. Finally, the influence of the faeces donnor bodyweight and the dietary fibre content of its diet on the gas production kinetics was shown. When studying a topic related to a specific category of pig, it is recommended to use animals from the same category as faeces donors to prepare the inoculum. In the second part of the thesis, the amount of protein synthesis (PS) by faecal microbes fermenting different sources of purified carbohydrates, or ingredients differing in DF content, was measured using 15N-labelled NH4Cl in the inoculum. PS ranged between 9.8 and 22.9 mg N g-1 fermented carbohydrate according to the rate of fermentation of the carbohydrate and its soluble fibre content. These in vitro observations were confirmed through in vivo experiments with diets containing increasing levels of soluble DF: in vitro PS passed from 1.51 to 2.35 mg N g-1 diet while in vivo urinary- N:fecal–N excretion ratio decreased from 2.171 to 1.177. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 114 (37 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailIn vitro characterization of the Bacillus subtilis protein tyrosine phosphatase YwqE
Mijakovic, Ivan; Musumeci, Lucia ULg; Tautz, Lutz et al

in Journal of Bacteriology (2005), 187(10), 3384-90

Both gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria possess protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) with a catalytic Cys residue. In addition, many gram-positive bacteria have acquired a new family of PTPs, whose ... [more ▼]

Both gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria possess protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) with a catalytic Cys residue. In addition, many gram-positive bacteria have acquired a new family of PTPs, whose first characterized member was CpsB from Streptococcus pneumoniae. Bacillus subtilis contains one such CpsB-like PTP, YwqE, in addition to two class II Cys-based PTPs, YwlE and YfkJ. The substrates for both YwlE and YfkJ are presently unknown, while YwqE was shown to dephosphorylate two phosphotyrosine-containing proteins implicated in UDP-glucuronate biosynthesis, YwqD and YwqF. In this study, we characterize YwqE, compare the activities of the three B. subtilis PTPs (YwqE, YwlE, and YfkJ), and demonstrate that the two B. subtilis class II PTPs do not dephosphorylate the physiological substrates of YwqE. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 15 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailIn Vitro Characterization Of The Homogalacturonan-Binding Domain Of The Wall-Associated Kinase Wak1 Using Site-Directed Mutagenesis
Decreux, Annabelle ULg; Thomas, Annick ULg; Spies, B. et al

in Phytochemistry (2006), 67(11), 1068-79

Wall-associated kinase 1--WAK1 is a transmembrane protein containing a cytoplasmic Ser/Thr kinase domain and an extracellular domain in contact with the pectin fraction of the plant cell wall in ... [more ▼]

Wall-associated kinase 1--WAK1 is a transmembrane protein containing a cytoplasmic Ser/Thr kinase domain and an extracellular domain in contact with the pectin fraction of the plant cell wall in Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) HEYNH. In a previous paper [Decreux, A., Messiaen, J., 2005. Wall-associated kinase WAK1 interacts with cell wall pectins in a calcium-induced conformation. Plant Cell Physiol. 46, 268-278], we showed that a recombinant peptide expressed in yeast corresponding to amino acids 67-254 of the extracellular domain of WAK1 specifically interacts with commercial non-methylesterified homogalacturonic acid, purified homogalacturonans from Arabidopsis and oligogalacturonides in a calcium-induced conformation. In this report, we used a receptor binding domain sequence-based prediction method to identify four putative binding sites in the extracellular domain of WAK1, in which cationic amino acids were selected for substitution by site-directed mutagenesis. Interaction studies between mutated forms of WAK1 and homogalacturonans allowed us to identify and confirm at least five specific amino acids involved in the interaction with homogalacturonan dimers and multimers. The presence of this homogalacturonan-binding domain within the extracellular domain of WAK1 is discussed in terms of cell wall architecture and signal transduction. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 8 (1 ULg)
Full Text
See detailIN VITRO CLONAL PROPAGATION OF A PROMISING AGROFUEL PRODUCING-PLANT : JATROPHA CURCAS L.
Medza Mve, Samson Daudet ULg; Mergeai, Guy ULg; Baudoin, Jean-Pierre ULg et al

Poster (2009, June 13)

In the present investigation, in vitro clonal propagation of two-month-old Jatropha curcas L. was achieved employing nodal explants. Axillary shoot bud proliferation was best initiated on Murashige and ... [more ▼]

In the present investigation, in vitro clonal propagation of two-month-old Jatropha curcas L. was achieved employing nodal explants. Axillary shoot bud proliferation was best initiated on Murashige and Skoog’s (MS) basal medium supplemented with N6-benzyladenine (BA) and adenine sulphate. This medium allowed the production of 3.1 ± 0.5 shoots per nodal explant with 3.5 ± 0.8 cm average length after 3-4 weeks. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 15 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailIn Vitro Comparison of the Antimycotic Activity of a Miconazole-Hp-Beta-Cyclodextrin Solution with a Miconazole Surfactant Solution
Piel, Géraldine ULg; Hayette, Marie-Pierre ULg; Pavoni, Ermanno et al

in Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy (2001), 48(1), 83-7

The antimycotic activity of a new parenteral solution containing miconazole was compared with that of a marketed solution (Daktarin IV solution). This solution has been withdrawn from the Belgian market ... [more ▼]

The antimycotic activity of a new parenteral solution containing miconazole was compared with that of a marketed solution (Daktarin IV solution). This solution has been withdrawn from the Belgian market, probably because of toxic effects related to the presence of polyoxyl 35 castor oil. We propose a new formulation containing miconazole (10 mg/mL) (like the marketed solution), in combination with hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin and lactic acid. The MICs of these two solutions were determined by a broth microdilution method (based on NCCLS guidelines) for 67 yeasts and 50 filamentous fungi isolates. This study shows that the MICs obtained with these two solutions are not significantly different. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 18 (4 ULg)
Full Text
See detailIn vitro culture of immature embryos of Phaseolus polyanthus Greenm. and Phaseolus vulgaris L.
Toussaint, André ULg; Clément, F.; Mergeai, Guy ULg et al

in Annual Report of the Bean Improvment Cooperative (2002), 45

Detailed reference viewed: 17 (1 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailIn vitro culture of seal muscle-derived satellite cells
Freichels, Astrid ULg; Baise, Etienne ULg; Jauniaux, Thierry ULg et al

Poster (2014, April)

Detailed reference viewed: 31 (9 ULg)