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Peer Reviewed
See detailGestire la diversità culturale e identitaria
Martiniello, Marco ULg

in Il Mulino (2000), anno XLIX(391), 881-889

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See detailGestural expressions of spatial information in L1 and L2
Maarten, Lemmens; Perrez, Julien ULg

Conference (2015)

This paper reports on the analysis of gestures in the expression of static locative relationships in French and Dutch, for L1 speakers as well as for francophone learners of Dutch (L2). The data analysed ... [more ▼]

This paper reports on the analysis of gestures in the expression of static locative relationships in French and Dutch, for L1 speakers as well as for francophone learners of Dutch (L2). The data analysed is drawn from video-taped picture descriptions where subjects were asked to talk about the location of certain entities on these pictures. Tutton (2012) has observed that in spatial descriptions gestures often express information that remains unexpressed in the verbal production and that typically the information that is gesturally expressed is directional (cf. also McNeill 2000; Gullberg 2009, 2010). Our data only partially confirm his findings: in most cases, gestures express information that is also expressed verbally. In addition, while gestures are indeed well-suited to express direction, we argue that a clearer distinction is needed between directional and (purely) locational gestures. We suggest that the crucial factor identifying a locative gesture is the fact of the gesture being anchored in the representational gesture space, an issue that hitherto has not been discussed in the literature. While all gestures are necessarily made in the gesture space, anchored gestures are those that receive a clear representational location. These can be pointing gestures, but often they are not (e.g., an anchored shape-, size- or manner-gesture). Functionally, they are not unlike what Liddell (2003) has called buoys in ASL, i.e., clearly located and stationary signs that function as conceptual landmarks while the discourse continues. The difference with anchored gestures is that the latter are not stationary. Non-anchored gestures do not have such a precise location. For example, directional gestures are not really anchored to a specific point, but merely indicate a direction. Similarly, some iconic gestures express locative relations (e.g. BETWEEN, EVERYWHERE), but are made without being anchored in the representational gesture space (e.g., just in front of the speaker, in centre space). We argue that despite their locative semantics, they are not locative gestures. In fact, anchored locative gestures could thus be seen as grounding predications, i.e. "an instance (but not a type) is thought of as having a particular location in the domain of instantiation" (Langacker 1991:57). In addition, typological differences are manifest in gesture. In line with Talmy’s (2000) typological distinction between verb-framed and satellite-framed languages, Dutch can be described as a “location-rich” language and the descriptions of the native Dutch speakers abound with locative descriptions, through the highly grammaticalised use of posture verbs but also via other linguistic means (prepositions, adverbs, etc.). French, in contrast, is “location-poor”: the French narrations have significantly fewer locative descriptions and the locative information is much more general. Instead, they add narrative detail and meta-linguistic comments to their descriptions. The francophone learners of Dutch (with 3 levels of proficiency) use more gestures revealing the challenge that free expression in a second language poses, especially for the lowest proficiency levels: they use more shape gestures, more enactment gestures (e.g., pulling a drawer, brushing one’s hair, etc.), more reality-anchored gestures (e.g., pointing at one’s shoes when talking about shoes), and more meta-communicative gestures indicating their lexical shortcomings, e.g., word- search gestures (see Ladewig 2011). Overall, and as can be expected, the low proficiency L2 speakers use almost more gestures than words, which can be seen as a visual compensation for their lack of lexical accuracy; the gestural expression of advanced learners, in contrast, is much more locational in nature, in line with the target language (cf. also Gullberg 2009, 2010, Alferink & Gullberg 2014). [less ▲]

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See detailGesture Subtype-Dependent Left Lateralization of Praxis Planning: An Event-Related fMRI Study.
Bohlhalter, Stephan; Hattori, Nori; Wheaton, Lewis et al

in Cerebral Cortex (2008)

Ideomotor apraxia is a disorder mainly of praxis planning, and the deficit is typically more evident in pantomiming transitive (tool related) than intransitive (communicative) gestures. The goal of the ... [more ▼]

Ideomotor apraxia is a disorder mainly of praxis planning, and the deficit is typically more evident in pantomiming transitive (tool related) than intransitive (communicative) gestures. The goal of the present study was to assess differential hemispheric lateralization of praxis production using event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging. Voxel-based analysis demonstrated significant activations in posterior parietal cortex (PPC) and premotor cortex (PMC) association areas, which were predominantly left hemispheric, regardless of whether planning occurred for right or left hand transitive or intransitive pantomimes. Furthermore, region of interest-based calculation of mean laterality index (LI) revealed a significantly stronger left lateralization in PPC/PMC clusters for planning intransitive (LI = -0.49 + 0.10, mean + standard deviation [SD]) than transitive gestures (-0.37 + 0.08, P = 0.02, paired t-tests) irrespective of the hand involved. This differential left lateralization for planning remained significant in PMC (LI = -0.47 + 0.14 and -0.36 + 0.13, mean + SD, P = 0.04), but not in PPC (-0.56 + 0.11 and -0.45 + 0.12, P = 0.11), when both regions were analyzed separately. In conclusion, the findings point to a left-hemispheric specialization for praxis planning, being more pronounced for intransitive gestures in PMC, possibly due to their communicative nature. [less ▲]

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See detailGetDDM: an Open Framework for Testing Optimized Schwarz Methods for Time-Harmonic Wave Problems
Thierry, Bertrand; Vion, Alexandre; Tournier, Simon et al

in Computer Physics Communications (2016), 203

Detailed reference viewed: 43 (21 ULg)
See detailGetDP et Gmsh
Geuzaine, Christophe ULg

Scientific conference (2010, June 16)

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Peer Reviewed
See detailGetDP/Gmsh: Benefits and Pitfalls of an Open Software Environment
Geuzaine, Christophe ULg

in Kettunen, L. (Ed.) Proceedings of the Advanced Computational Electromagnetism workshop, Seminar on Modern Software Design (2004, August 02)

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See detailGetDP: a general environment for the treatment of discrete problems
Dular, Patrick ULg; Geuzaine, Christophe ULg

Software (1997)

GetDP is a general finite element solver using mixed elements to discretize de Rham-type complexes in one, two and three dimensions. The main feature of GetDP is the closeness between the input data ... [more ▼]

GetDP is a general finite element solver using mixed elements to discretize de Rham-type complexes in one, two and three dimensions. The main feature of GetDP is the closeness between the input data defining discrete problems (written by the user in ASCII data files) and the symbolic mathematical expressions of these problems. See http://geuz.org/getdp for more information. [less ▲]

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Peer Reviewed
See detailGetDP: a general finite-element solver for the de Rham complex
Geuzaine, Christophe ULg

in PAMM Volume 7 Issue 1. Special Issue: Sixth International Congress on Industrial Applied Mathematics (ICIAM07) and GAMM Annual Meeting, Zürich 2007 (2008)

Detailed reference viewed: 35 (2 ULg)
See detailGetrouwheid aan de huisarts en het gebruik van zorg : een multivariatie benadering
De Prins, L; Gosset, Christiane ULg; De maeseneer, J et al

Conference (1997)

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See detailGetting insights on bovine mastitis treatment efficacy based on tissular indicators with an integrated udder health management file: Project LAECEA.
Theron, Léonard ULg; Reding, Edouard; Rao, Anne-Sophie ULg et al

Poster (2013, August)

Mastitis is the most “antibiotic consuming” pathology in dairy medicine. Though antibiotics and antibiograms are known to vets since the early fifties, our practices did not evolved a lot from empiric ... [more ▼]

Mastitis is the most “antibiotic consuming” pathology in dairy medicine. Though antibiotics and antibiograms are known to vets since the early fifties, our practices did not evolved a lot from empiric antibiotic therapy. Indeed, the need for a treatment, the cost and the delay for an antibiogram are most of the time incoherent with a routine practice. Nevertheless, there is a surge for rational use of antibiotics. Our study was based on 1100 mastitis events from 30 Belgian farms collected between January 2011 and June 2012. We chose to compare tissular cure (TC) based on the threshold of 200.000 somatic cells/ml in milk at milk control at least 60 days after the clinical mastitis event. Regarding the mastitis event, severity (according 3 grades: alteration of milk as grade 1, alteration of quarter as grade 2 and alteration of general state as grade 3), quarter, treatments were recorded. We also assessed a chronicity status based on previous somatic cell count (SCC) of the cow. It was considered a new case a cow which at least 15 days before had an SCC <200.000 cells/ml, other were marked as chronic cases. In our distribution, we see a seasonal rise of incidence between January and May. This period would represent twice as many mastitis as the summer period. Overall TC reaches 46% of all mastitis events, which is quite poor. Rear quarters had significantly lower TC (p<0,05%). Grade 3 mastitis had lower TC, 42,6% (p<0.05%) versus 48,9 % for grade 2 and 44,2% for grade 1. Almost 49% of all mastitis was considered as chronic cases, which TC was 33% on average, whereas new cases reached 55,3% TC. Study of treatment was frustrating given the high number of different combinations of treatments. It was underlined that 4th generation cephalosporins (C4G) were the most used in our cohort, followed by aminopenicillin/methicillin association (PENA/PENM) and 1st generation cephalosporins/aminoglycosids (C1G/AG) association. Of these intramammary treatments, 20% of the cases were submitted to a second intramammary drug, mostly C1G or C1G/AG. One third of the cases were treated parenterally with antimicrobials, mostly macrolids, fluoroquinolones and penethacillin. Finally, 10% of mastitis was treated with anti-inflammatory drugs, mostly tolfenamic acid and flunixin-meglumin. Comparing mastitis without use of a secondary intramammary drug, only PENA and C1G/AG reached more than 60% TC. Considering new cases, then C1G/AG, PENA/PENM and Prednisolone containing specialties were above 60% TC. Use of a parenteral injections increased TC only on new cases (+12%), but not on chronic cases. Refining by severity, TC improved with a parenteral on new cases, mainly in grade 1 (+20%). Regarding associated factors, TC was negatively affected by chronicity, parity and lactation stage. Indeed, TC was lower on cases from more than 4 month in milk, third lactation (OR = 2.8 for no cure) compared with previous, and chronic cases (OR=2,6). Seemingly, chronicity was positively associated with parity and season. The 3rd parity cases had higher chances to be chronic ones (OR = 1,7), as well as cases from April to September (OR = 1,6). This evaluation of cure is rather simple and has a good variability which allows several questions about the real match between antimicrobial treatment for mastitis and the udder inflammation. Based on our epidemiological data, we can modify routine management of mastitis, as some cases might not worth the antimicrobial treatment. [less ▲]

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Peer Reviewed
See detailGetting more out of end-of-life vehicles – a bio hydrometallurgical approach
Lewis, Gregory; Bastin, David ULg; Gaydardzhiev, Stoyan ULg et al

Conference (2010)

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See detailGetting more out of end-of-life vehicles: a bio hydrometallurgical approach
Lewis, Grégory ULg; Lambert, Fanny ULg

Conference (2010, November 09)

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See detailGetting on Board but How? Conflicting Perspectives on the Role of the Social Sciences and Humanities in Radiation Protection
Van Oudheusden, Michiel ULg; Rossignol, Nicolas ULg; Perko, Tanja et al

Conference (2016, March 14)

In Europe, science research policy is predicated on the understanding that science and technology (S&T) serve societal needs. Accordingly, European Framework Programs urge scientists and technologists to ... [more ▼]

In Europe, science research policy is predicated on the understanding that science and technology (S&T) serve societal needs. Accordingly, European Framework Programs urge scientists and technologists to give due attention to societal and ethical aspects of S&T, and to engage with social scientists and humanists when doing research and reaching out to society. Starting from these policy prescriptions and from invitations from befriended life scientists to "get on board," we explore the terms of our involvement as social scientists and humanists in a European Joint Program on radiation protection research (EJP-CONCERT). We illuminate recurring tensions between instrumental, normative, and substantive perspectives on the role of the social sciences and humanities (SSH) in radioprotection research and nuclear S&T. Our aim is to shed light on the controversial and contingent nature of integrating SSH into nuclear S&T, as actors articulate divergent assumptions and expectations about SSH and society. These expectations pertain to the value of SSH research for S&T, issues of trust and legitmacy, and different perspectives on risk and uncertainty. By rendering these tensions explicit we seek to probe the implications for SSH of developing a separate SSH Strategic Research Agenda (SRA) within radiation protection research. [less ▲]

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See detailGetting the facts straight ?
Leclercq, Bruno ULg

Conference (2011, November 25)

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See detailGetting the measure of the stars -- W. A. Cooper et E. N. Walker
Manfroid, Jean ULg

in Ciel et Terre (1989), 105

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See detailGetuigen van het geschil. Politiek in het recente werk van Jean-François Lyotard
Spinoy, Erik ULg

in Vanmarcke, Luc; Devos, Rob (Eds.) De marges van de macht. Filosofie en politiek in Frankrijk: 1981-1995 (1995)

This article takes a closer look at the views on politics held in the recent work of Jean-François Lyotard.

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See detailEen geval van hypocalciëmie
Geenen, Vincent ULg

in Belgische Medische Actualiteiten (1995), 472

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See detailLe Gevarenwinkel Festival de Herselt
Sacré, Robert ULg

E-print/Working paper (2015)

Compte rendu du Festival Gevarenwinkel à HERSELT les 28 et 29 août 2015 , avec photos

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See detailHet gevecht met de lezer: Jacques Perk en Percy Bysshe Shelley
Steyaert, Kris ULg

in Tijdschrift voor Nederlandse Taal- en Letterkunde (2010), 126(2), 150-165

Like Percy Bysshe Shelley, whose poetry proved an important source of inspiration, Jacques Perk was much preoccupied with the reception of his work and the complex, often antagonistic relationship between ... [more ▼]

Like Percy Bysshe Shelley, whose poetry proved an important source of inspiration, Jacques Perk was much preoccupied with the reception of his work and the complex, often antagonistic relationship between the author and his readers. His letters to Carel Vosmaer bear out how Perk had a particular type of reader in mind when writing his poems, including the famous lyric ‘Iris’. In the introductory matter, as well as in the poems themselves, he promoted reading strategies that, to some extent, foreshadow Wolfgang Iser’s ideas as developed in his Rezeptionsästhetik. The reactions to Perk’s work show the various ways in which contemporary and later readers defied his (implicit) reading instructions. [less ▲]

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