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Peer Reviewed
See detailFlow modeling in an underground gasifier at great depth by the Boundary-Element Method
MATHY, B.; PIRLOT, Pierre; Pirard, Jean-Paul ULg et al

in In Situ (1994), 18(4), 399-418

In order to simulate the cavity growth of an underground gasifier in thin seams at great depth, Wilks1 has developed an original model that solves the continuity equation in the horizontal plane with the ... [more ▼]

In order to simulate the cavity growth of an underground gasifier in thin seams at great depth, Wilks1 has developed an original model that solves the continuity equation in the horizontal plane with the hypothesis of radial fluid flow around the injection well. In the model presented here, the continuity equation in the horizontal plane has been taken into account, removing the limiting assumption on flow (radial direction) assumed by Wilks. The simultaneous solution of the continuity equation and the Darcy law has been carried out using the Boundary Element Method (BEM); this method is particularly suitable for solving problems where boundary conditions are of prime importance. The model enables the influences of the permeability of the medium and gasifier geometry to be demonstrated. [less ▲]

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See detailFlow of magnetic repelling grains in a two-dimensional silo
Lumay, Geoffroy ULg; Schockmel, Julien ULg; Henandez-Enriquez, D. et al

in Papers in Physics (2015)

Detailed reference viewed: 24 (3 ULg)
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See detailFlow of magnetized grains in a rotating drum
Lumay, Geoffroy ULg; Vandewalle, Nicolas ULg

in Physical Review. E : Statistical, Nonlinear, and Soft Matter Physics (2010)

We have experimentally investigated the influence of a magnetic interaction between the grains on the flow of a granular material in a rotating drum.

Detailed reference viewed: 113 (8 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailFlow Pattern Evolution With Time Mixing Of Non-Newtonian Fluid In A Stirred Tank Using Particle Image Velocimetry
Fransolet, Emmanuelle; Marchot, Pierre ULg; Toye, Dominique ULg et al

in American Society of Mechanical Engineering (ASME) (Ed.) Proccedings of 7th Biennal ASME Conference, Engineering Systems Design and Analysis – ESDA 2004, Manchester, United Kingdom,19 – 22 July 2004 (2004)

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See detailFlow patterns and sediment deposition in rectangular shallow reservoirs
Dufresne, Matthieu; Dewals, Benjamin ULg; Erpicum, Sébastien ULg et al

in Water & Environment Journal (2012), 26(4), 504-510

This work involves the experimental investigation of flow patterns, preferential regions of deposition and trapping efficiency in rectangular shallow reservoirs. The main flow patterns that can be ... [more ▼]

This work involves the experimental investigation of flow patterns, preferential regions of deposition and trapping efficiency in rectangular shallow reservoirs. The main flow patterns that can be encountered in rectangular shallow reservoirs are described: symmetrical flows without any reattachment point (S0), asymmetrical flows with one reattachment point (A1), and asymmetrical flows with two reattachment points (A2). The influence of geometrical and hydraulic parameters on reattachment lengths is intensively investigated. A shape parameter is introduced to classify symmetrical and asymmetrical flows. For each flow pattern, the preferential regions of deposition are studied. To conclude, a number of practical recommendations are given. Reservoirs with a shape parameter lower than 6.2 limit sediment deposition. Reservoirs with a shape parameter greater than 6.8 are favourable for sediment deposition. Finally, perspectives for maximizing and minimizing deposition are given, respectively by exploiting the great trapping potential of the flow pattern A1 and the poor trapping potential of the flow pattern S0. [less ▲]

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See detailFlow Processing and the Rise of Commodity Network Hardware
Greenhalgh, Adam; Huici, Felipe; Hoerdt, Mickael et al

in ACM SIGCOMM Computer Communication Review (2009)

The Internet has seen a proliferation of specialized middlebox devices that carry out crucial network functionality such as load balancing, packet inspection and intrusion detection. Recent advances in ... [more ▼]

The Internet has seen a proliferation of specialized middlebox devices that carry out crucial network functionality such as load balancing, packet inspection and intrusion detection. Recent advances in CPU power, memory, buses and network connectivity have turned commodity PC hardware into a powerful network platform. Furthermore, commodity switch technologies have recently emerged offering the possibility to control the switching of flows in a fine-grained manner. Exploiting these new technologies, we present a new class of network architectures which enables flow processing and forwarding at unprecedented flexibility and low cost. [less ▲]

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See detailFlow rate dependency of critical wall shear stress in a radial-flow cell
Detry, Jean G; Jensen, Bo Boye Busk; Sindic, Marianne ULg et al

in Journal of Food Engineering (2009), 92(1), 86-99

In the present work, a radial-flow cell was used to study the removal of starch particle aggregates from several solid substrates (glass, stainless steel, polystyrene and PTFE) in order to determine the ... [more ▼]

In the present work, a radial-flow cell was used to study the removal of starch particle aggregates from several solid substrates (glass, stainless steel, polystyrene and PTFE) in order to determine the critical wall shear stress value for each case. The particle aggregates were formed by aspersion of a water or ethanol suspension of starch granules on the surfaces. Depending on the substrate and on the suspending liquid, the aggregates differed in size and shape. Aggregate removal was studied at two flow rates. At the lower flow rate (Re-inlet = 955), the values of critical wall shear stress for the different surfaces suggested that capillary forces were, for all of them, playing an important role in aggregate adhesion since aqueous based aggregates were always more difficult to remove. At the higher flow rate (Re-inlet = 2016) the critical wall shear stress increased as a result of the change in the flow pattern in the vicinity of the aggregates and not because of changes in the type of particle adhesion. This raises the importance of the experimental conditions on assessing the critical wall shear stress since this parameter may not be always only directly related to the soil adhesion strength. (C) 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailFlow rate quality of new flat fan nozzles
Huyghebaert, Bruno; Debouche, Charles ULg; Mostade, Olivier

in Transactions of the ASAE (2001), 44(4), 769-773

Manufacturers of spraying nozzles have established manufacturing tolerances to guarantee the quality of their products. They control, among other things, the new nozzles’ flow rate by comparison with the ... [more ▼]

Manufacturers of spraying nozzles have established manufacturing tolerances to guarantee the quality of their products. They control, among other things, the new nozzles’ flow rate by comparison with the nominal flow rate. When the deviation exceeds a set limit, the nozzles are rejected. A survey carried out among three manufacturers made it possible to determine the manufacturing tolerances and limits that manufacturers impose upon themselves. The flow rates of 1565 new nozzles collected on the market from these manufacturers were measured on a device developed for this study. Different statistical tests assessed the performances and characteristics of the products. The quality standards announced by the manufacturers were not checked for every nozzle. On average, 20% of the new nozzles exceeded the manufacturing tolerances. The average flow rate of the nozzle sets equalled the nominal flow rate. In practice, the probability distribution of the flow rate of new nozzles should be normal. The dispersion of the new nozzle flow rates was slightly higher than the theoretical one. The quality of the products differed from one manufacturer to another. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 75 (5 ULg)
See detailThe flow structure of the Norwegian Atlantic Current
Hopkins, T. S.; Mouchet, Anne ULg; Giannecchinni, P.

Conference (1989, March)

Detailed reference viewed: 10 (1 ULg)
See detailFlow through porous media
Dassargues, Alain ULg

Scientific conference (1995)

Detailed reference viewed: 9 (0 ULg)
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See detailFlow Visualization and Proper Orthogonal Decomposition of Aeroelastic Phenomena
Andrianne, Thomas ULg; Norizham, Abdul Razak ULg; Dimitriadis, Grigorios ULg

in Okamoto, Satoru (Ed.) Wind Tunnels (2011)

The modal decomposition of unsteady flowfields was proposed in the 1990s by several authors. Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) is one method that can be used in order to perform this modal ... [more ▼]

The modal decomposition of unsteady flowfields was proposed in the 1990s by several authors. Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) is one method that can be used in order to perform this modal decomposition; it became popular for aerodynamics research in the 2000s, although it was first proposed for use in fluid dynamics in the 1960s. The objective of the present work is to expand the methodology of the application of POD to experimental flowfields. There are two aspects to this expansion: 1. Allow the models to oscillate. The source of the unsteadiness will then be the movement of the model, as well as any unsteadiness due to flow separation. 2. Study the interaction between the different sources of unsteadiness. In particular observe how the modes generated by one source of unsteadiness interact with the modes generated by the other. Determine if it is possible to separate the structural from the aerodynamic sources of unsteadiness. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 172 (31 ULg)
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See detailFlow-Chemistry Education Seminar
Monbaliu, Jean-Christophe ULg

Scientific conference (2017, March 07)

This seminar presents the efforts for implementing flow-chemistry in early chemistry curricula and academic research labs. We will illustrate the key concepts that are integrated in a series of lectures ... [more ▼]

This seminar presents the efforts for implementing flow-chemistry in early chemistry curricula and academic research labs. We will illustrate the key concepts that are integrated in a series of lectures organized at the Department of Chemistry, University of Liège (Belgium). These lectures are complemented by workshops that successfully convey the subject matter at hand through practice in the lab. Some practical aspects for a successful curricular implementation will be thoroughly discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailFlow-cytometric assessment of damages to Acetobacter senegalensis during freeze-drying process and storage
Shafiei, Rasoul ULg; Delvigne, Frank ULg; Thonart, Philippe ULg

in Acetic Acid Bacteria (2013), 2(2(s1)), 10

Downstream processes have great influences on bacterial starter production. Different modifications occur to cellular compounds during freeze-drying process and storage of bacterial starters. Consequently ... [more ▼]

Downstream processes have great influences on bacterial starter production. Different modifications occur to cellular compounds during freeze-drying process and storage of bacterial starters. Consequently, viability and culturability (multiplication capacity) undergo some changes. In this study, the effects of freeze-drying process and storage conditions were examined on cell envelope integrity, respiration and culturability of Acetobacter senegalensis. <br />Freezing of cells protected with mannitol (20% w/w) did not affect cell multiplication and respiration considerably; however, 19% of cells showed compromised cell envelope after freezing. After drying, 1.96×1011 CFU/g were enumerated, indicating that about 34% of the <br />cells could survive and keep their culturability. Drying of the cells induced further leakage in cell envelope and finally 81% of cells appeared as injured ones; however, 87% of the dried cells maintained their respiration capacity. Storage temperature had significant effect on cell multiplication ability; higher storage temperature (35°C),caused 8.59-log reduction in cell culturability after nine-month period of storage. Collapse of cell envelop integrity and respiration wasobserved at 35°C. At lower storage temperature (4°C), the culturability <br />decreased about one-log reduction after nine months. Cell envelope integrity was subjected to minor changes during a period of nine month-storage at 4°C whereas a heterogeneous population of cells with different respiration capacity emerged at 4°C. These results indicate that a major part of cells undergone drying process and storage entered into viable but non-culturable state. In addition, usage of different culture media didn’t improve resuscitation. Besides, it seems that sub-lethal damages to cell envelope caused uptake of propidium iodide, however these kinds of injuries could not impress cell multiplications and respiration. [less ▲]

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See detailA flow-cytometry-based method for detecting simultaneously five allergens in a complex food matrix
Otto; Lamote; Deckers et al

in Journal of Food Science and Technology (2016), 53

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See detailFlowConvertor: Enabling Portability of SDN Applications
Pan, Heng; Xie, Gaogang; Li, Zhenyu et al

in IEEE INFOCOM 2017 (2017)

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See detailFLOWCV - AN OPEN-SOURCE TOOLBOX FOR COMPUTER VISION APPLICATIONS IN TURBULENT FLOWS
Bung, Daniel B.; Valero Huerta, Daniel ULg

in Proceedings of the 37th IAHR World Congress (2017, August)

Despite the continuous advances in numerical modeling methods and the continuous increase of computer power and storage capacities in the last decades, physical modeling remains a common technique for ... [more ▼]

Despite the continuous advances in numerical modeling methods and the continuous increase of computer power and storage capacities in the last decades, physical modeling remains a common technique for evaluation of flow processes. One major advantage of this classical approach is given by the transparency of experiments as the flow can be easily observed in the laboratory and effects of changing boundary conditions may be better understood. Nowadays, the flow is commonly captured in most experiments with means of digital cameras or high-speed cameras to get a better insight and for further analyses after the model test. Besides some well-known techniques, such Particle Image Velocimetry, some new methods can be found in Computer Vision disciplines allowing for more detailed investigation of the images. This paper presents two modules of the new open-source toolbox FlowCV which has been developed to be applied in hydraulic laboratories. The first module is given by a synthetic particle image generator which provides the user with particle images of a predefined motion and turbulence. The second module implements different Optical Flow methods for determination of obstacle movement (here: particle movement). The Farnebäck method, which is presented in this paper, gives dense velocity fields, i.e. velocity data for every image pixel. The Optical Flow results based on the synthetic images are then benchmarked against their predefined particle velocity. It will be shown that even smallest turbulent flow structures are adequately detected. [less ▲]

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See detailFlowering Goes Underground
Bouché, Frédéric ULg; Lobet, Guillaume ULg; D'Aloia, Maria ULg et al

Poster (2014, May 15)

Flowering is a crucial step in plant life cycle and is therefore tightly controlled by both environmental and endogenous cues. The involvement of the aerial organs of the plant in the molecular mechanisms ... [more ▼]

Flowering is a crucial step in plant life cycle and is therefore tightly controlled by both environmental and endogenous cues. The involvement of the aerial organs of the plant in the molecular mechanisms controlling floral transition has been extensively documented while the participation of the roots remains poorly investigated. However, the induction of flowering by photoperiod involves systemic signals that move in the phloem from leaves to sinks, and hence presumably reach the roots. We therefore performed a transcriptomic analysis of the roots during the induction of flowering in Arabidopsis thaliana and indeed identified a large number of differentially expressed genes. A reverse genetic approach further confirmed the pleiotropic effects of flowering time genes on root architecture. [less ▲]

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See detailThe flowering process: On the track of controlling factors in Sinapis alba
Bernier, Georges ULg; Corbesier, Laurent; Périlleux, Claire ULg

in Russian Journal of Plant Physiology (2002), 49(4, JUL-AUG), 445-450

The major physiological theories of the control of the flowering process are first presented and their inferences tested in the long-day plant Sinapis alba. Then, the genetic analyses of the control of ... [more ▼]

The major physiological theories of the control of the flowering process are first presented and their inferences tested in the long-day plant Sinapis alba. Then, the genetic analyses of the control of flowering time in Arabidopsis thaliana are also summarized with a brief overview of the several pathways, each including several genes, identified. Clearly, both the experimental data of physiological experiments and the multiplicity of interacting genetic pathways best support the theory of the multifactorial control of flowering. This is further shown by the fact that a critical gene expressed in the shoot meristem at floral transition in S. alba, MADS A (orthologous to A. thaliana SOC1), can be upregulated by a single dose of a cytokinin or a gibberellin, without leading to flowering. This indicates that the floral shift requires upregulation of other genes by other factors. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 66 (0 ULg)